Author Topic: The Generals on Paper Modeling Judging  (Read 1836 times)

milenio3

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The Generals on Paper Modeling Judging
« on: August 15, 2014, 08:19:30 PM »
Now that the IPMS 50th Anniversary came and go (well, not yet, IPMS is still in the making of 2 if not 3 issues of its Journal), I came about thinking on what to judge on paper modeling... for plastic modelers. I come to a contest, and I cannot judge myself, so it must be a plastic modeler guy.

Share your ideas in format of concepts. I'm planning to give a talk at the local modeler's club, to educate them.

I'm planning also to present photos with details and construction reports.

Thank you in advance.
- Gerardo
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Dave Winfield

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Re: The Generals on Paper Modeling Judging
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2014, 11:18:16 PM »
Are you asking for judging criteria (for paper models)?
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Vermin King

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Re: The Generals on Paper Modeling Judging
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2014, 08:07:16 AM »
I am not the one to ask.  Like at car shows, I get easily swayed by the less-than-concrete standard of 'wow factor'
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Dave Winfield

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Re: The Generals on Paper Modeling Judging
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2014, 08:51:44 AM »
If I were judging a paper model in competition, I would look at some of these criteria:

a. scratchbuilt or kit? (more of a category thing)
- if its a scratchbuilt, is it a free build, or from a design.
b. an original idea or a model that has been done too many times?
c. seams ...clean, tight, hidden? or sloppy and visible?... the overall seam invisiblity thing.
d. edge colouring (if applicable). is it there? is done well? is it necessary?
e. paint and putty used? or is it an all paper build?...maybe this is a category thing again?
f. neat and clean?: visible glue or adhesive products, cleanliness, stains, water marks... damage...paper creasing, dents, etc
g. smooth curves and rolls on wing edges, rolled tubes, etc
h. overall presentation...base, stand, diorama, signage, multiple models?

I have no idea how judging is done in model competitions.
but I think I might start with a perfect score....maybe 100 points.
And start deducting points for negative things.

Just some ideas.
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Tapcho

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Re: The Generals on Paper Modeling Judging
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2014, 10:38:32 AM »
If I remember correctly in plastic world the categories are for instance for aircraft the plane type (prop, jet, WWI or WWII era etc.) and related scale and in all these categories all extra detailing is allowed. Also such oddities like separate categories for 'vac-formed' kits and 'in flight' models. Then there are several other categories like conversions, scratch built, OOTB (out of the box - no extra detailing allowed other than paint job) etc.

I think the plastic world the key point is how well the model represents the real life subject. And judging that includes scale issues, workmanship, level of detailing, reference accuracy as well as the accuracy of the workmanship (paint job, weathering, base etc.). And when doing that they count points to the model (additive or subtractive way), usually 2-3 judges and the combined points of them all puts the models in order. Usually no discussion just the points (at least that's the way here in Finland).

I see several problems with those rules applied to paper models:
1. The paper kit itself needs only to be assembled (no need for other work like painting, applying decals etc.). So the accuracy, consistency and assembly skills are vital (those that Dave listed and that is at least with the OOTP (out of the paper) models.
2. I wouldn't judge on the originality or rareness of the kit chosen - every build is unique to the builder even if you have seen it too many times.
3. Then there are all the modifications:

- repaints
- kit bashing
- conversions

and with those are to be judged at least skills within digital imaging and painting, to some extent model designing skills when one produces new parts and so on.

And the the scratch building in which case paper is just a chosen medium.

Just some quick thoughts.

Tappi


Dave Winfield

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Re: The Generals on Paper Modeling Judging
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2014, 10:52:09 AM »
You state: "accuracy, consistency and assembly skills are vital"
and "And judging that includes scale issues, workmanship, level of detailing, reference accuracy as well as the accuracy of the workmanship"

So, I disagree that the choice of model shouldn't be a factor in some judgement.
Choosing to build a kit that has been built many times and isn't an original choice
can result in a much easier build, since there is lots of help available.
There are many references to use to avoidmistakes and a builder can copy proven build methods.

We often point unskilled builders to models that have build threads or kits that we
already know go together easily.
In the same way you might judge and favour the model with more parts (over a simpler design),
you can also credit the person who chooses an untested kit that puts his modelling skills to the test.

And I was also thinking about "presentation".
A poorly built model can be improved if it is presented well. Maybe in a diorama or display.
And an unknown model can be more interesting to viewers (as opposed to one seen many times, regardless of how well its built).
In this way it garners more attention, and could be considered more significant on the judging table.

...
Isn't this the reason for having multiple Judges?
Because each Judge has a slightly different view of what to judge and reward...
resulting in a more balanced choice.
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Tapcho

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Re: The Generals on Paper Modeling Judging
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2014, 02:30:54 AM »
I think judges follow a set of judging criteria set for them to work on. If that states judging the subject choice well then it's ok. Wouldn't expect many Spitfire or Mustang builds in that competition though.
Anything can be judged it's merely a matter of choice. One nice development in Finnish modeling scene is that many modelers are incorporating some kind of base for their models. I think that improves the presentation immensely - it's a European trend and I don't know how much it's done in your continent.

Having said all that I do understand that a different and unique subject choice draws attention in a good way. I mean how many yellow Piper J-3 Cubs one wants to see during a short human lifespan? In the plastic world the emphasis is to present the model as true to the original and that points out the use of correct references. Model kits with with their known faults are one of the expertise a judge should have. Not that every judge should be an all round expert of all modeling subjects but all that plays far too big role in modern competitions. Did the modeler correct the wing span, did he re-engrave the panel lines right and so on. In the paper world that work is the designers domain (or not by the look of some models) and the builder can't very much have any effect on that. That is basicly the reason why I underlined the workmanship of the assembly.

In competitions it's always interesting to see what is the audiences preference compared to the winners judges pick up. Many times surprising results come up. In Finland some competitions offer a written statement (usually to junior builders) of how to improve ones work in the future. Not something you can do in big scale.

In a perfect world we wouldn't compete so much but try to improve our personal performance.

Tappi

Tappi

milenio3

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Re: The Generals on Paper Modeling Judging
« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2014, 12:42:20 AM »
Guys, all your answers are exactly what I need for my talk in the local club.

The thing is that in the plastic world paint is a must and judges go for that, then other things expressed in your comments.

In paper (and that is what I want them to see), is the handling of the paper in first instance... then everything else.

I guess I have a pretty good picture of how to present my talk.

And of course, in paper you only have one and only one F-14 in adversary livery - Maly Modelarz 7-8-9/2004. I'm currently building it and of course I go to the forums to guide me on my build... THEN I add "my own crop", like we say in Mexico... details that are not in the kit like cockpit buttons and levers, break lines in the landing gear, pipes on the wheel wells, etc. One example is the modifications I added to Dave's Mustangs when I cut the control surfaces on the wings and tail.

But again, in at least a US and Mexico competition (and other countries in America - the continent - and in Spain), there are not too many paper models in a single competition, so I don't expect to see more than 3 airplanes and 5 figurines and 2 cars; so we cannot add more than 2 categories: real models and fictional models.

Thank you again for your time in this matter!!Please keep on adding more ideas. Think like a plastic modeler and think of what you want to see... and think like a paper modeler and what do you want them to see.

Scenario: You spent many months building a Halinski model (cost goes beyond the 20 dollar limit), going by the kit and without adding anything else. Then you lose against a Star Wars paper model (free model), with no edge painting. You found out that the judges (plastic modelers) gave the Star Wars model the first place because it looks pretty. They cannot have a clue what efforts you put in building an intricate model... hell, they don't recognize the difference between the kits in the paper world, but they see a "cute" model and they go nuts about it. I guess there is the need for a little education. Yes, the Star Wars model is very well built, and credit to it, but I say... let's give it some balance here. My answer: place an photo album of your construction report (and maybe add dates).

But again, if I see a Halinski model with cracks in the paper, unbalanced, glue stains... I will give my vote for a very nice build of a Fiddlersgreen model if it's built like PĂ©ricles builds his airplanes.
- Gerardo
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milenio3

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Re: The Generals on Paper Modeling Judging
« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2014, 12:43:54 AM »
I am not the one to ask.  Like at car shows, I get easily swayed by the less-than-concrete standard of 'wow factor'

What is your 'wow factor', Vermin?
- Gerardo
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Vermin King

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Re: The Generals on Paper Modeling Judging
« Reply #9 on: August 24, 2014, 08:31:44 AM »
Wow factor is hard to explain.  Detail, cleanliness of the build, and is it something that shows the amount of effort.  I have a pretty good idea of what it takes to achieve certain effects, and if I see something well done that I know I couldn't do, that adds to the Wow-ness.  Dave's treads on the Centurion fit that category.  In Dave's Racers thread at PM.com, a member has a phenomenal job of clear coating his plane.  Again 'Wow'.  The way Boats very quickly puts together his planes, with everything looking good is a 'Wow'. 

I also have a 'wow' for obtaining the look and feel in a simple fashion.  Dave's Captain Nemo car fits that well.  That is not a car that should fit the Koolwheelz criterion, but he did it, and did it well.

How you would express that as a set of guidelines, I don't know.
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Dave Winfield

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Re: The Generals on Paper Modeling Judging
« Reply #10 on: August 24, 2014, 09:36:48 AM »
You brought up a good point...judging of competing paper models should only be done by a competent paper modeler(s).
Let the public pick a "Viewer's Choice" for fun,
but make sure the real Awards reflect the quality of the entries.

There is definitely a need for multiple categories just like in Plastic judging
to avoid the scenario of a poorly built "Star Wars" model being judged above a well built obscure WW2 Truck model.

I think most judging follows the same lines...in the end you are judging an overall build quality and quality of workmanship,
but you will have some varied criteria (paper vs plastic) to get to that judgement.
For example, in plastic you might judge the final hand/spray painted appearance based on the quality of the paintwork,
...with a paper model you could judge the print quality, type of paper or cardstock, overall surface finish, use of clearcoats, etc
You can also add a seperate category for those paper models that have received paint.

What irks me the most is the attitude toward paper models as being a seperate modeling category at the "plastic" events.
Unless the event is specifically a "plastic only" event...which is never the case.
You would have a tough time finding a "plastic" model at any Model show, that is completely and only plastic.
Paint, glue, wire, metal, string, paper, resin, foam, putties, wood, cloth...are all common build materials used with plastic models.
I've seen all metal...all resin...and all wood scale models in subject/theme categories (at an IPMS event).
And yet, they have not been separated away from the plastic stuff.

But as soon as you bring in a "paper" model, it is isolated to the "Catch All" (or Miscellaneous) table!
There is no conderation for the subject...or the display (diorama)...or the final look.
It is classed only as a "non-plastic" model and segregated.
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