Author Topic: CorelDraw to pdf  (Read 1083 times)

yukonjohn

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CorelDraw to pdf
« on: March 27, 2015, 01:55:59 PM »
Hi all.  I have been learning-by-doing on CorelDrawX6 and having some fun.  However, when I save-as my cdr file as a pdf, the pdf file size grows by 2 or 3 times the size of the original cdr file.  Am I missing something for pdf settings to get the pdf file size down? Any hints would be appreciated.

Regards,
John

Vermin King

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Re: CorelDraw to pdf
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2015, 02:14:15 PM »
I don't really know, but it is probably tied to the number of pixels/length
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Burning Beard

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Re: CorelDraw to pdf
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2015, 08:21:15 PM »
I'm guessing about this, but I'm pretty sure Corel is converting the drawing to a raster format for PDF instead of the vector format that Corel uses.  Vector files are quite small if they don't have bitmaps included in the drawing.

Beard

Dave Winfield

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Re: CorelDraw to pdf
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2015, 08:53:33 PM »
The corel file size has very little bearing on the final saved file.

The final file size is dependant on the format or file type
and how the file type is optimized.

And depending on what type of file it is, you have various save options.
Default settings may not be what you want, so you'll need to make changes.
(Are you publishing directly to PDF within Corel? if so...What is your PDF handler?)

A PDF file will often be larger because of the many items reformatted and saved within the PDF.
Obviously this depends on your save settings.
But there are additional "optimization" options once you have created your PDF.
Once again, it depends on the PDF handler.

If you are using Acrobat, I can show you everything you need to know.
If some other PDF publisher, I may be in the dark.

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yukonjohn

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Re: CorelDraw to pdf
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2015, 05:03:01 PM »
I had been using the pdf publisher within CorelDrawX6.  I downloaded the free PDFill program and it prints the cdr files to pdf files at about half the size of the CorelDraw pdf files, so that helps.  I will keep exploring and trying different settings.  If anyone who has Acrobat has a bit of extra time to try PDFill, it would be interesting to know if the files from Acrobat are smaller than PDFill for the same CorelDraw original.

Any other tips are greatly appreciated.

Regards,
John

Dave Winfield

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Re: CorelDraw to pdf
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2015, 07:08:34 PM »
To publish to PDF from within Coreldraw, you have to have a PDF program installed.
I have Adobe Acrobat...
you might have something else and your options may differ.
The PDF program usually integrates into your save/publish options within Corel.

The final PDF file size really has no bearing on the original Corel file.
It is based on the contents, elements and functions within the PDF.
It can also depend on how the PDF is optimized for certain uses.

I'm going to run through the steps when I publish to PDF.
Most of my PDF needs are models that I am am sharing (free or retail).
So I have particular settings in place to give me the best file size, the best quality, etc.

I am using Corel X6.

heres a quick file I made for this example, it contains only vector artwork.
A simple diagram with one or two soild colour fills.
No raster elements at all.
Some text...which has not been converted to curves.



...
To publish, I choose "File" and then choose "Publish to PDF"
(down near the bottom of the list of options)
which is there because I have a PDF program installed.


...

A save window appears, and I save as Type - PDF
but under that is a PDF preset save option.
I am using "Custom", but there are many default settings you can choose from.
These vary the type of PDF...basically adjusting its quality and its components and functions.

I have already created my own Custom save setting that suits what I want in my PDFs.


...
To the right is the "Settings" button that opens the options to create a "custom" save setting.
This is the important step.
Here you can set up a number of publishing options that will dictate how your PDF is saved
and will also control its file size.

One thing I wanted to do, was get rid of a lot of embedded functions and features of a PDF
that I don't need in a paper model file. This is a major way to reduce file sizes.

But, my Custom settings also include things like converting all colours to RGB, and converting all
text to curves.


...
So, I use my already established "Custom" save setting...publish/save to PDF
and the final file size (as you can see) is about one third of the original Corel file size.

As I said...I'm not concerned with the Corel file size,
as long as the final PDF file is a reasonable size for what it is.


...
To illustrate further, I went back to a proper model file...with vector artwork, raster elements,
colour fills, various fonts/text, bitmap layering, etc
I saved this file and then I published, using exactly the same "Custom" setting, to PDF.


...
Once again, the file appears to be one third the size of the original Corel file.
I don't usually pay attention to this, but maybe based on my settings, there is a consistency.


...
I am not done there...after creating my PDF, I open it in Acrobat.
I check everything, and make sure the PDF hasn't done anything weird. (It happens a lot)
And if all looks well, I then go through the PDF Optimization.
Acrobat can optimize the PDF further to reduce file size.
You can once again, use some default optimization settings,
or set up "custom" settings based on your own requirements
to eliminate uneccessary things within the PDF, adjust image qualities, change compatibilities, etc
After optimization, that 1.31mb PDF went down to 732kb.
The reduction varys depending on the elements within the PDF, but every little bit helps.

Biggest reduction factor is often reducing bitmap DPI.
I set my files to convert anything above 300dpi (to a maximum 300dpi).
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Dave Winfield

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Re: CorelDraw to pdf
« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2015, 07:20:51 PM »
Might I suggest, start by analyzing the elements of your Corel file.

For example, my model cover pages use a lot of layered images and vector elements.
I found that many vector elements could be combined into a single bitmap image
and greatly reduce the overall file size for that page.
Its an area (of my models) where I didn't need to retain all the vector elements.

By reducing the Corel file to start with, the PDF file will get a lot smaller.

If you want to send me a file to analyze for you, feel free.
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yukonjohn

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Re: CorelDraw to pdf
« Reply #7 on: April 01, 2015, 02:54:25 AM »
Ah, the old choose-the-publish-to-pdf button trick  ::).  I have not been understanding the terminology.  I was not publishing to pdf, I was choosing save-as a pdf which did not give me any control.  Your step by step is very enlightening.  I am going to have to explore this more fully.  This is the kind of help I appreciate in our card model community.

Your offer to look at my file is very much appreciated.  I will email you direct.

Regards,
John

Dave Winfield

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Re: CorelDraw to pdf
« Reply #8 on: April 01, 2015, 08:49:32 AM »
Some call me annoying...some call me helpful.
I like to think of myself as...

short, but very cuddly.
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