Author Topic: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder  (Read 19901 times)

Rcav8tr2

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Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« on: April 18, 2015, 02:37:19 PM »
Hello all!  I stumbled onto Dave's fantastic Centurion and was blown away.  I emailed a link it to my Dad who is a 33 year retired Canadian Armoured Corp veteran who forwarded it to all his military buddies.  Everyone is very impressed.  I've attached a photo of Dad and his crew (Norm Wood, Crew Commander, unknown, loader, Smokey, driver, Paul Brezden, Gunner) who were performing cold weather acceptance testing on Centurions in CFB Shilo, Manitoba circa early 1950's.  They did 1700 miles one winter performing coolant curves which required that the tank be kept moving even while refueling.  They would refill from jerry cans passed to crew on the rear deck.







I've never built a paper model so I have a steep learning curve ahead.  I started by emailing Dave to determine what type of paper and how to laminate without distortion from the glues.  He responded very quickly suggesting 3M 77 to laminate the large pieces of paper.  Well here goes...

Dave Winfield

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2015, 09:19:07 PM »
This is a huge step for a first model.

But I still think its possible.
One of my goals is to design kits that will satisfy beginners as well as experienced modelers.
Take you time...post your progress...ask for help whenever you need it.

I'll be watching.
DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!

Rcav8tr2

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2015, 10:04:40 PM »
Laminated three layers 0.3 Poster Paper purchased from Target.





Setup outside table for spraying 3M 77 with appropriate safety equipment. 



As luck would have it, my old 3M 77 had clogged the nozzle, a few minutes with mineral spirits, a syringe and model plane fuel tubing cleared it. 





Rcav8tr2

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2015, 10:12:20 PM »
Started cutting parts to learn technique for thick cardstock.  Using hobby knife, which I keep honing on fine sandpaper to retain edge, on a liberated kitchen cutting board.  Three passes and the 1.0 mm is cut.







Used a circle cutter to test cutting turret rings.  Finding the circle center point is my biggest problem.  The circles cut well but take a slow and steady hand.

Dave Winfield

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2015, 11:39:57 PM »
I go through a lot of hobby blades.
Sharpening is a good idea, and extends the life of each blade.

Circle cutters are a good idea, but most papermodellers will tell you they are more trouble than they are worth.
I cut everything by hand...slow and steady...painful at times...but all by freehand.
Do whatever works best for you.
DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!

Burning Beard

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2015, 06:14:09 PM »
I keep my hobby knife "touched up" with a pocket stone.  I usually replace the blade about once a year. I have a circle cutter but have found it easier to just cut circles by hand, like Dave says slow and steady.  It also helps (at least me) to make short cuts, then turn the stock and cut again, that way you don't have to stand on your head. A useful tool for your kit is a Book Punch (you can get them on Amazon) which is a hand held leather punch thingy that has interchangeable sized punches.  It is not like a leather punch, you push it onto the paper and it turns leaving a nice clean hole it also retains the part you cut out that can be used for rivets and such.

Beard

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2015, 07:24:19 PM »
I don't do many large projects, but I think that you shouldn't have too much trouble if you work it as a series of smaller projects that interconnect.  That's how I keep from being overwhelmed.  Finessing the parts to be close to the final shape before gluing helps.  Dry-fit a couple times before gluing.
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Rcav8tr2

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #7 on: April 20, 2015, 10:36:04 PM »
Thanks for the supporting comments and thank you Beard, I've just ordered a punch set from Amazon.  I've been working on the drivers compartment parts.  Completed the seat assembly, steering levers, gear shift and clutch / gas pedal assembly. 











The seat back was a challenge.  Since it is a curved closed box type of structure.  I had to cut the rear of the seat back oversize and lightly bound the seat back to a card tube to dry in the correct curved shape.  After the glue cured I trimmed the extra material.  A bit of paint touch up and it looks great.

Dave Winfield

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2015, 11:37:47 PM »
I forgot that I had turned back on the picture attachment feature. lol
Since I have limited storage with this forum, I didn't want to fill it up with picture attachments.
But you are doing such a good job with file sizes, I have no complaints at the moment.

Please look into using an external photo site though...most of us use photobucket.
Maybe you can continue with your methods for this thread, but consider other photo options for any other threads? thanks

Interior parts look great so far.
I actually did not curve my driver's seat...but yours looks good.
To be honest, my seat design is not that accurate anyway.

On mine, the front is curved, but the back is almost flat.
The sliver part, thats fits at the bottom, and either side, fills the gap and allows the front curve.




DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!

Rcav8tr2

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2015, 07:20:15 PM »
I've finished working on the drivers compartment.  Yes, I curved the seat back and the front, getting over-zealous trying to form parts.  Fantastic design Dave!  As long as I cut precisely to your layout the parts work perfectly.   Moving on to the transmission assembly.  Every time I look at what appears to be a simple part I find it to be a new challenge.  But so far it's working out.  I've moved pictures to Postimage to save space.










Dave Winfield

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2015, 11:35:08 PM »
This is great work so far.
DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!