Author Topic: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder  (Read 19960 times)

Burning Beard

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #11 on: April 22, 2015, 08:15:44 PM »
A quick tip for the Book Punch.... use a circle template to line it up, it also keeps it from slipping.

Beard

Rcav8tr2

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #12 on: April 23, 2015, 09:19:38 AM »
I've completed the transmission assembly discovering many tiny parts requiring gluing.









Used a small glue applicator "Hypo-25" from Gaunt Industries with a watered down glue mix for the tiny parts.  I also use this applicator to add a 3d effect to some of the fasteners.  It is most useful to simulate rivets, not so happy with bolts.



Segment of music wire used to align transmission parts which I have yet to permanently glue.  I've got to check spacing in the hull first.

Dave Winfield

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #13 on: April 23, 2015, 11:26:52 AM »
I love the glue applicator...its exactly what I need!

Looks like you are moving along quite nicely so far.

I use wooden dowels for many many things.
axles, connectors, support rods and alignment rods.
Rods for inside rolled tubes, etc.
I think I used one in this Transmision assembly.
(Made rolling the Gun Barrel a lot easier too!)

I have an assortment of wooden dowels in all kinds of sizes, purchased from Dollar stores and Craft stores.
DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!

Rcav8tr2

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #14 on: April 23, 2015, 05:13:10 PM »
Thanks Beard, for the tip using the circle template, great idea!  BTW, my mail lady just delivered my punches, so I can play with them tonight.  Dave, I'm assuming the dowels are used as a mandrel to assist forming and alignment and not left in as a structural component.  Do you remove all the non-paper components?

Dave Winfield

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #15 on: April 23, 2015, 05:45:24 PM »
No...thats my point...I use wooden dowels and sticks in many projects.
Its about the only thing I can tolerate in a "paper" model.

wood=pulp=paper I say
DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!

Rcav8tr2

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2015, 07:37:49 PM »
Installing wood pieces where additional structural integrity/alignment is required makes sense.  Played with my punches using a piece of plywood as a backup and plastic faced hammer.  Punches didn't cut very well, I'll sharpen them and try a nylon backing plate. 

Completed cooling fans with new challenge of forming and gluing the conical shape, which went easier than I thought it might.  Used a lead pencil to touch up edges of stators which leaves a silvery burnished looking edge.



Glued strip of fan stator blade halves together and then cut each blade segment out.


Dave Winfield

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #17 on: April 24, 2015, 09:15:40 PM »
I often hear this question: "when i cut out a part, do I cut inside, on or outside the edge line?"

I design my own parts in vector, which means the line is the exact part size I want.
So, I personally try to cut on the line...dead center.
Its virtually impossible to stay dead center, but I do my best to follow the centerline.

Only reason I am saying this, is because I can see a fairly heavy printed edge line on some of your parts
which indicates to me that you may be cutting on the outside of the line.
While this gives you room to make adjustments, it may also give you constantly oversize parts.

I doubt its a problem all the time, but I'm sure you'll see an issue every now and then.
With a model of this scale, its not going to be a big issue.
Just wanted to alert you to that.
Please keep going.
DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!

Rcav8tr2

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #18 on: April 26, 2015, 11:11:01 PM »
Thanks Dave.  Yes I've been cutting to the outside of the lines.  I'll adjust going forward.  Purchased wrong punches, failed to really read and understand Beard's description of the punch.  My "hammer against a backing" type punches don't work on paper, I did some research last night and found what Beard was referring to.  A way cool rotating hollow cutter hand tool with interchangeable tips.  Ordered from Amazon late last night.



Trimmed glue tab to permit radiator hinge pin to pass through easily.




Completed a radiator and added a piece of corrugated cardboard from a box to provide added strength since I'll be wanting to use rad hinges.  Care must be exercised to ensure core alignment of radiator cores to radiator frame.  I'm having reasonable success with Derwent watercolor pencils used dry.  Using Blue Grey #68 here.

Rcav8tr2

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #19 on: April 26, 2015, 11:27:53 PM »
Air Filter assemblies sequence



Start by scoring fold lines with a dulled hobby blade, then cut out parts including a bunch of tabs...



Pre-form using palm and Hobby Knife with blade removed...





This technique works well.



Glued cylinder leaving reference alignment mark exposed.  Or should I glue to hide the white?



Inverted cylinder with top aligned and glued from inside with long stick.


 
Completed Air Filters with canister tops incorrectly aligned to engine air inlet tube openings.  Completed Air Filter assemblies, may re-do since tops don't fit as well as I would like.

Burning Beard

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #20 on: April 27, 2015, 08:22:22 PM »
Another suggestion for a scoring tool is a mechanical pencil (like a .5) just don't use it with the lead out, lol.  It is very easy to see the point, I used one for a long time.  Now I use a yarn needle (not a knitting needle), it has a dull point.  I made a holder for it by drilling a hole down the end of a piece of dowel, the I hit the dowel with a fine wood rasp to take off the sharp edges, even made a round end on it that I can use for burnishing.

Beard

Dave Winfield

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Re: Canadian Centurion with 20 Pounder
« Reply #21 on: April 27, 2015, 10:17:42 PM »
The "white stripe" on your cylinders is actually just the space on the paper between the cylinder part and the glue strip.
You should have cut out the part and the glue strip separately.
The glue strip is optional, but its also a standard method of joining the seam of cylindrical parts.
It mounts on the inside of the part, across the seam.

Don't worry about, your part should work fine.
Maybe colour the white stripe green?

Your inexperience is a legitimate excuse in this case.
More experienced modellers often take basic things for granted.
In fact, I'm going to do up a tutorial diagram to illustrate some cylinder assembly methods like this.
This is good info for beginners.
DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!