Author Topic: Joiner strips and other assembly methods  (Read 1009 times)

Dave Winfield

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Joiner strips and other assembly methods
« on: April 27, 2015, 11:44:18 PM »
I may add more to this topic, but first up are the simple methods of creating a cylinder part
using various seam connections. The diagram below should illustrate it quite well.
Don't hesitate to ask questions.
This type of connection occurs on other part assemblies, not just cylinders.

Its good practice to try all these methods and figure out which one works best for you.
You can usually alter a model if you don't care for the suggested assembly method.
But if not, at least you will have some experience with various methods.


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Rcav8tr2

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Re: Joiner strips and other assembly methods
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2015, 09:13:16 AM »
This is a great explanation!  Thanks for taking the time to illustrate and post.

Dave Winfield

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Re: Joiner strips and other assembly methods
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2015, 10:07:38 AM »
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Dave Winfield

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Re: Joiner strips and other assembly methods
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2015, 10:07:55 AM »
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paperbones

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Re: Joiner strips and other assembly methods
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2017, 08:21:09 PM »
With regard to your diagram of tab joins, particularly the one you describe as the overlap method, I've found that the use of a burnishing tool (the one with the steel ball at the ends) is good for levelling the join. Just make the normal tab join then flip the piece over and from the back run the burnishing tool along the joint as in my crude hand drawn diagram.



Of course not all joins can be accessed but for easy to get at joins this works well. It saves the drama of having to form the paper to get the same result.

Bones

Dave Winfield

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Re: Joiner strips and other assembly methods
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2017, 07:05:42 PM »
A very good point!

This is something I have suggested in the past.

Along with my scoring tool, I use old credit cards, ruler edges, even thick card, to create a "step" for overlapping joints.
I will usually run a coloured marker along the step, mathcing the part colour, so there isn't a join/gap showing.






...
I just pruned this thread...removed a couple of older, less relevant posts that were affected by the photobucket disaster.
My apologies to the poster, but I will need to do this in many areas.

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