Author Topic: March (2016)  (Read 2273 times)

Vermin King

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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2016, 02:34:12 PM »
March 8, 1950 First VW Type 2 Produced



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Volkswagen, maker of the Beetle automobile, expands its product offerings to include a microbus, which goes into production on this day in 1950. Known officially as the Volkswagen Type 2 (the Beetle was the Type 1) or the Transporter, the bus was a favorite mode of transportation for hippies in the U.S. during the 1960s and became an icon of the American counterculture movement.

The VW bus was reportedly the brainchild of Dutch businessman Ben Pon, an importer of Beetles to the Netherlands, who saw a market for a small bus and in 1947 sketched out his concept. Volkswagen engineers further developed the idea and in March 1950, the vehicle, with its boxy, utilitarian shape and rear engine, went into production. The bus eventually collected a number of nicknames, including the “Combi” (for combined-use vehicle) and the “Splittie” (for its split windshield); in Germany it was known as the “Bulli.” In the U.S., it was referred to by some as a hippie van or bus because it was used to transport groups of young people and their camping gear and other supplies to concerts and anti-war rallies. Some owners painted colorful murals on their buses and replaced the VW logo on the front with a peace symbol. According to “Bug” by Phil Patton, when Grateful Dead musician Jerry Garcia died in 1995, Volkswagen ran an ad featuring a drawing of the front of a bus with a tear streaming down it.

The bus was only the second product offering for Volkswagen, a company whose history dates back to the 1930s Germany. In 1933, Adolf Hitler became chancellor of Germany and announced he wanted to build new roads and affordable cars for the German people. At that time, Austrian-born engineer Ferdinand Porsche (1875-1951) was already working on creating a small car for the masses. Hitler and Porsche later met and the engineer was charged with designing the inexpensive, mass-produced Volkswagen, or “people’s car.” In 1938, work began on the Volkswagen factory, located in present-day Wolfsburg, Germany; however, full-scale vehicle production didn’t begin until after World War II.

In the 1950s, the Volkswagen arrived in the U.S., where the initial reception was tepid, due in part to the car’s historic Nazi connection as well as its small size and unusual rounded shape (which later led to it being dubbed the “Beetle”). In 1959, the advertising agency Doyle Dane Bernbach launched a groundbreaking campaign that promoted the car’s diminutive size as a distinct advantage to consumers, and over the next several years VW became the top-selling auto import in the U.S. In 1972, the VW Beetle passed the iconic Ford Model T as the world’s best-selling car, with over 15 million vehicles produced.
... History.com

For the model, let's go with the PaperDiorama model, http://www.paperdiorama.com/paper-models/cars/vw-sambabus/
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #12 on: March 09, 2016, 02:04:38 PM »
March 9, 1918 First U.S. Airman Killed in Combat



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Captain James Ely Miller, commanding officer, 95th Aero Squadron, 1st Pursuit Group, American Expeditionary Force, accepted the invitation of Major Davenport Johnson to join him and Major Harmon for a short patrol over the lines in three SPAD VII C.1 fighters borrowed from a French squadron.

Major Harmon’s SPAD had engine trouble and he turned back. Major Johnson and Captain Miller continued and encountered four German fighters. Shortly after the air battle began, Major Johnson abandoned the fight, leaving Captain Miller on his own. Captain Miller was shot down.

The German pilot who downed Miller and a German intelligence officer who had rushed to the crash scene witnessed Captain Miller’s dying words in which he cursed Major Davenport Johnson for leaving him during the air battle.

On 12 March, Major Johnson assumed command of the 95th.

Captain Miller was the first United States airman killed in combat. In 1919, Miller Field, Staten Island, New York, was named in his honor.

The airplane in this photograph is a SPAD VII C.1, serial number A.S. 94099, built by Société Pour L’Aviation et ses Dérivés, and restored by the 1st Fighter Wing, Selfridge Air Force Base, Michigan. It is in the collection of the National Museum of the United States Air Force, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.
... ThisDayinAviation



You can get your own SPAD VII C at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-100-spad-sa2-french-national-colors-paper-model.html
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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2016, 01:22:34 PM »
March 10, 1959 Tibet Revolts



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On this day in 1959, Tibetans band together in revolt, surrounding the summer palace of the Dalai Lama in defiance of Chinese occupation forces.

China’s occupation of Tibet began nearly a decade before, in October 1950, when troops from its People’s Liberation Army (PLA) invaded the country, barely one year after the Communists gained full control of mainland China. The Tibetan government gave into Chinese pressure the following year, signing a treaty that ensured the power of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, the country’s spiritual leader, over Tibet’s domestic affairs. Resistance to the Chinese occupation built steadily over the next several years, including a revolt in several areas of eastern Tibet in 1956. By December 1958, rebellion was simmering in Lhasa, the capital, and the PLA command threatened to bomb the city if order was not maintained.

The March 1959 uprising in Lhasa was triggered by fears of a plot to kidnap the Dalai Lama and take him to Beijing. When Chinese military officers invited His Holiness to visit the PLA headquarters for a theatrical performance and official tea, he was told he must come alone, and that no Tibetan military bodyguards or personnel would be allowed past the edges of the military camp. On March 10, 300,000 loyal Tibetans surrounded Norbulinka Palace, preventing the Dalai Lama from accepting the PLA’s invitation. By March 17, Chinese artillery was aimed at the palace, and the Dalai Lama was evacuated to neighboring India. Fighting broke out in Lhasa two days later, with Tibetan rebels hopelessly outnumbered and outgunned. Early on March 21, the Chinese began shelling Norbulinka, slaughtering tens of thousands of men, women and children still camped outside. In the aftermath, the PLA cracked down on Tibetan resistance, executing the Dalai Lama’s guards and destroying Lhasa’s major monasteries along with thousands of their inhabitants.

China’s stranglehold on Tibet and its brutal suppression of separatist activity has continued in the decades following the unsuccessful uprising. Tens of thousands of Tibetans followed their leader to India, where the Dalai Lama has long maintained a government-in-exile in the foothills of the Himalayas.
... History.com

Canon offers a paper model of the Potala Palace at http://cp.c-ij.com/en/contents/CNT-0010464/index.html
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #14 on: March 11, 2016, 12:17:24 PM »
March 11, 1818 Frankenstein Published



I think it is quite possible that Mary Shelley, Percy Bysshe Shelley and Lord Byron could have spun off more than a couple reality series, if TV were around back then.  If you are interested in literary history, check them out.  Frankenstein actually was the result of Lord Byron's challenge to the Shelley's to each write a Gothic novel and then they would compare and see which was best.  Mary was the only one to finish hers.  It was truly a unique novel for the time, studying good and evil.  Many consider it to be the first Science Fiction novel.  I really wish the 'series of letters' approach hadn't been used, but it is a good story line.

There are so many great Frankenstein (actually the monster) models and crafts.  Here are a few:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bobcanada/4909287464/in/set-72157622200633441/ by Bob Canada
http://www.ss42.com/frankenpaper/ masks etc.
http://papermau.blogspot.com.br/2012/05/animes-franken-paper-toy-by-paper-block.html

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Vermin King

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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #15 on: March 13, 2016, 08:42:24 PM »
March 13, 1969 'The Love Bug' Opens



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On this day in 1969, “The Love Bug,” a Walt Disney movie about the adventures of a Volkswagen Beetle named Herbie, opens in theaters across the United States. The film, which was based on a 1961 book called “Car, Boy, Girl” by Gordon Buford, centered around down-on-his-luck auto racer Jim (played by Dean Jones) who goes on a winning streak after teaming up with Herbie. Other characters in the film include the evil Peter Thorndyke (David Tomlinson), Jim’s rival on the racetrack; Tennessee Steinmetz (Buddy Hackett), Jim’s friend who makes art from used auto parts and Jim’s girlfriend Carole (Michele Lee). “The Love Bug” was a box-office success and spawned the cinematic spinoffs “Herbie Rides Again” (1974), “Herbie Goes to Monte Carlo” (1977), “Herbie Goes Bananas” (1980) and “Herbie: Fully Loaded” (2005), starring Lindsay Lohan.

According to “Bug” by Phil Patton, the movie was a hit “due in large part to its PG rating and the fact that the great baby boom had peaked in 1960, providing Disney with a bumper crop of nine-year-olds.” Patton also notes that the “The Love Bug” offered an escape: “The day the film opened, the news was full of the costs of Vietnam: 432 Americans had died in the most recent Vietcong offensive and Defense Secretary Melvin Laird was asking for increased spending on the war.”

“The Love Bug” was released just as VW Beetles, whose history dates back to 1930s Germany, were gaining widespread popularity in the United States. In 1933, Adolf Hitler became chancellor of Germany and announced he wanted to build new roads and cars for the German people. At that time, Austrian-born engineer Ferdinand Porsche (1875-1951) was already working on creating a small car for the masses; thus, he was charged with designing the inexpensive, mass-produced “people’s car.” Work began in 1938 on the Volkswagenwerk factory, located in present-day Wolfsburg, Germany; however, car making halted during World War II.

After the war, production eventually resumed and by the 1950s Volkswagen was exporting Beetles (as the car, with its sloped nose and curved rear body, became widely known) to the U.S. After an initial tepid reception, sales took off and on February 17, 1972, the VW Beetle surpassed the Ford Model T to become the world’s biggest selling car of all time, with more than 15 million sold.
...History.com

Okay, not Herbie from the first movie, but about the best Herbie paper model out there: http://wongday.blogspot.com.es/2013/11/vw-herbie.html
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #16 on: March 14, 2016, 04:55:10 PM »
March 14, 1879 Einstein Born



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On March 14, 1879, Albert Einstein is born, the son of a Jewish electrical engineer in Ulm, Germany. Einstein’s theories of special and general relativity drastically altered man’s view of the universe, and his work in particle and energy theory helped make possible quantum mechanics and, ultimately, the atomic bomb.

After a childhood in Germany and Italy, Einstein studied physics and mathematics at the Federal Polytechnic Academy in Zurich, Switzerland. He became a Swiss citizen and in 1905 was awarded a Ph.D. from the University of Zurich while working at the Swiss patent office in Bern. That year, which historians of Einstein’s career call the annus mirabilis–the “miracle year”–he published five theoretical papers that were to have a profound effect on the development of modern physics.

In the first of these, titled “On a Heuristic Viewpoint Concerning the Production and Transformation of Light,” Einstein theorized that light is made up of individual quanta (photons) that demonstrate particle-like properties while collectively behaving like a wave. The hypothesis, an important step in the development of quantum theory, was arrived at through Einstein’s examination of the photoelectric effect, a phenomenon in which some solids emit electrically charged particles when struck by light. This work would later earn him the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics.

In the second paper, he devised a new method of counting and determining the size of the atoms and molecules in a given space, and in the third he offered a mathematical explanation for the constant erratic movement of particles suspended in a fluid, known as Brownian motion. These two papers provided indisputable evidence of the existence of atoms, which at the time was still disputed by a few scientists.

Einstein’s fourth groundbreaking scientific work of 1905 addressed what he termed his special theory of relativity. In special relativity, time and space are not absolute, but relative to the motion of the observer. Thus, two observers traveling at great speeds in regard to each other would not necessarily observe simultaneous events in time at the same moment, nor necessarily agree in their measurements of space. In Einstein’s theory, the speed of light, which is the limiting speed of any body having mass, is constant in all frames of reference. In the fifth paper that year, an exploration of the mathematics of special relativity, Einstein announced that mass and energy were equivalent and could be calculated with an equation, E=mc2.

Although the public was not quick to embrace his revolutionary science, Einstein was welcomed into the circle of Europe’s most eminent physicists and given professorships in Zýrich, Prague, and Berlin. In 1916, he published “The Foundation of the General Theory of Relativity,” which proposed that gravity, as well as motion, can affect the intervals of time and of space. According to Einstein, gravitation is not a force, as Isaac Newton had argued, but a curved field in the space-time continuum, created by the presence of mass. An object of very large gravitational mass, such as the sun, would therefore appear to warp space and time around it, which could be demonstrated by observing starlight as it skirted the sun on its way to earth. In 1919, astronomers studying a solar eclipse verified predictions Einstein made in the general theory of relativity, and he became an overnight celebrity. Later, other predictions of general relativity, such as a shift in the orbit of the planet Mercury and the probable existence of black holes, were confirmed by scientists.

During the next decade, Einstein made continued contributions to quantum theory and began work on a unified field theory, which he hoped would encompass quantum mechanics and his own relativity theory as a grand explanation of the workings of the universe. As a world-renowned public figure, he became increasingly political, taking up the cause of Zionism and speaking out against militarism and rearmament. In his native Germany, this made him an unpopular figure, and after Nazi leader Adolf Hitler became chancellor of Germany in 1933 Einstein renounced his German citizenship and left the country.

He later settled in the United States, where he accepted a post at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. He would remain there for the rest of his life, working on his unified field theory and relaxing by sailing on a local lake or playing his violin. He became an American citizen in 1940.

In 1939, despite his lifelong pacifist beliefs, he agreed to write to President Franklin D. Roosevelt on behalf of a group of scientists who were concerned with American inaction in the field of atomic-weapons research. Like the other scientists, he feared sole German possession of such a weapon. He played no role, however, in the subsequent Manhattan Project and later deplored the use of atomic bombs against Japan. After the war, he called for the establishment of a world government that would control nuclear technology and prevent future armed conflict.

In 1950, he published his unified field theory, which was quietly criticized as a failure. A unified explanation of gravitation, subatomic phenomena, and electromagnetism remains elusive today. Albert Einstein, one of the most creative minds in human history, died in Princeton in 1955.
  ...History.com

You can find a cubee of Albert at http://www.cardmodel.cn/forum.php?mod=viewthread&tid=1912&extra=page%3D1

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Vermin King

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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #17 on: March 15, 2016, 02:55:24 PM »
March 15, 44 BC  Julius Caesar Murdered

Beware the Ides of March. 

"Julius Caesar, the "dictator for life" of the Roman Empire, is murdered by his own senators at a meeting in a hall next to Pompey's Theatre. The conspiracy against Caesar encompassed as many as sixty noblemen, including Caesar's own protege, Marcus Brutus.

"Caesar was scheduled to leave Rome to fight in a war on March 18 and had appointed loyal members of his army to rule the Empire in his absence. The Republican senators, already chafing at having to abide by Caesar's decrees, were particularly angry about the prospect of taking orders from Caesar's underlings. Cassius Longinus started the plot against the dictator, quickly getting his brother-in-law Marcus Brutus to join.

"Caesar should have been well aware that many of the senators hated him, but he dismissed his security force not long before his assassination. Reportedly, Caesar was handed a warning note as he entered the senate meeting that day but did not read it. After he entered the hall, Caesar was surrounded by senators holding daggers. Servilius Casca struck the first blow, hitting Caesar in the neck and drawing blood. The other senators all joined in, stabbing him repeatedly about the head.

"Marcus Brutus wounded Caesar in the groin and Caesar is said to have remarked in Greek, "You, too, my child?" In the aftermath of the assassination, Antony attempted to carry out Caesar's legacy. However, Caesar's will left Octavian in charge as his adopted son. Cassius and Brutus tried to rally a Republican army and Brutus even issued coins celebrating the assassination, known as the Ides of March. Octavian vowed revenge against the assassins, two years later Cassius and Brutus committed suicide after learning that Octavian's forces had defeated theirs at the Battle of Philippa in Greece.

"Antony took his armies east, where he hooked up with Caesar's old paramour, Cleopatra. Octavian and Antony fought for many years until Octavian prevailed. In 30 B.C., Antony committed suicide. Octavian, later known as Augustus, ruled the Roman Empire for many more years."  History.com

You can remember Julius with J.Ossorio's model at http://librosgratispapercraftymas.blogspot.com/2013/04/julio-cesar-papercraft.html


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Vermin King

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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #18 on: March 16, 2016, 01:10:08 PM »
March 16, 1971 Alan Tudyk Born



Well, if they ever do another Serenity/Firefly movie, I guess Wash won't be in it, but I really like this little gem from Jim Bowen, http://newobmij.tumblr.com/tagged/Firefly



Hmmm, he was in Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter?  Maybe I will have to watch it
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Dave Winfield

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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #19 on: March 16, 2016, 02:27:57 PM »
Hmmm, he was in Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter?  Maybe I will have to watch it

LOL dont bother
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #20 on: March 17, 2016, 01:42:18 PM »
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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #21 on: March 18, 2016, 02:49:25 PM »
March 18, 1945 XBT2D-1 Dauntless II First Flight



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At the Naval Airplane Factory, El Segundo, California, (Mines Field, now known as LAX) Douglas Aircraft Company Director of Flight Test LaVerne “Brownie” Brown took the prototype XBT2D-1 Dauntless II, Bu. No. 9085, for its first flight.

The XBT2D-1 would be in production as the Douglas AD-1 Skyraider.

3,180 Skyraiders in 11 variants were built at the Douglas Aircraft Company’s El Segundo, California plant from 1945 to 1957. The attack bomber was widely used during the Korean War and the Vietnam War. It was utilized for many purposes but is best known for its close support missions during combat rescue operations. After 1962, the AD-series aircraft still in service were redesignated A-1E through A-1J.

The most numerous Skyraider variant was the AD-6 (A-1H), of which 713 were produced by Douglas.
...This Day in Aviation

You can get an A-1H at http://www.bobscardmodels.altervista.org/page2.htm
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