Author Topic: March (2016)  (Read 2286 times)

Vermin King

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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #33 on: March 27, 2016, 10:55:38 PM »
March 27, 1968 Gagarin Dies

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Colonel Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin was killed in the crash of a MiG-15UTI two-place trainer near the town of Kirzach, Vladamir Oblast, Russia.

Yuri Gagarin was the first human to fly into space when he orbited Earth aboard Vostok I, 12 April 1961.
... This Day in Aviation



You can find Vostok I at http://web.archive.org/web/20110202024733/http://www.ericksmodels.com/gallery/vostok/vostok.html
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #34 on: March 29, 2016, 03:40:34 PM »
March 29, 1974 Mariner 10 Visits Mercury



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The unmanned U.S. space probe Mariner 10, launched by NASA in November 1973, becomes the first spacecraft to visit the planet Mercury, sending back close-up images of a celestial body usually obscured because of its proximity to the sun.

Mariner 10 had visited the planet Venus eight weeks before but only for the purpose of using Venus’ gravity to whip it toward the closest planet to the sun. In three flybys of Mercury between 1974 and 1975, the NASA spacecraft took detailed images of the planet and succeeded in mapping about 35 percent of its heavily cratered, moonlike surface.

Mercury is the second smallest planet in the solar system and completes its solar orbit in only 88 earth days. Data sent back by Mariner 10 discounted a previously held theory that the planet does not spin on its axis; in fact, the planet has a very slow rotational period that stretches over 58 earth days. Mercury is a waterless, airless world that alternately bakes and freezes as it slowly rotates. Highly inhospitable, Mercury’s surface temperature varies from 800 degrees Fahrenheit when facing the sun to -279 degrees when facing away. The planet has no known satellites. Mariner 10 is the only human-created spacecraft to have visited Mercury to date.
...History.com

You can get a model of Mariner 10 at http://jleslie48.com/gallery_models_postapollo.html
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wag

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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #35 on: March 29, 2016, 05:20:35 PM »
"Mercury is the second smallest planet in the solar system" Is that still counting Pluto as a planet?
Wayne

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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #36 on: March 29, 2016, 06:08:02 PM »
They are history folks, not scientists...
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Dave Winfield

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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #37 on: March 29, 2016, 06:53:25 PM »
Why does that look like Wall-e at the center of Mariner?

or, a Minion?
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #38 on: March 29, 2016, 08:22:40 PM »
Hitching a ride
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #39 on: March 30, 2016, 03:46:35 PM »
March 30, 1950 Robbie Coltrane Born



You can get Rubeus Hagrid's hut at http://www.mascal.it/paper2_e.html
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2016)
« Reply #40 on: March 31, 2016, 02:45:29 PM »
March 31, 1889 Eiffel Tower Opens



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On March 31, 1889, the Eiffel Tower is dedicated in Paris in a ceremony presided over by Gustave Eiffel, the tower’s designer, and attended by French Prime Minister Pierre Tirard, a handful of other dignitaries, and 200 construction workers.

In 1889, to honor of the centenary of the French Revolution, the French government planned an international exposition and announced a design competition for a monument to be built on the Champ-de-Mars in central Paris. Out of more than 100 designs submitted, the Centennial Committee chose Eiffel’s plan of an open-lattice wrought-iron tower that would reach almost 1,000 feet above Paris and be the world’s tallest man-made structure. Eiffel, a noted bridge builder, was a master of metal construction and designed the framework of the Statue of Liberty that had recently been erected in New York Harbor.

Eiffel’s tower was greeted with skepticism from critics who argued that it would be structurally unsound, and indignation from others who thought it would be an eyesore in the heart of Paris. Unperturbed, Eiffel completed his great tower under budget in just two years. Only one worker lost his life during construction, which at the time was a remarkably low casualty number for a project of that magnitude. The light, airy structure was by all accounts a technological wonder and within a few decades came to be regarded as an architectural masterpiece.

The Eiffel Tower is 984 feet tall and consists of an iron framework supported on four masonry piers, from which rise four columns that unite to form a single vertical tower. Platforms, each with an observation deck, are at three levels. Elevators ascend the piers on a curve, and Eiffel contracted the Otis Elevator Company of the United States to design the tower’s famous glass-cage elevators.

The elevators were not completed by March 31, 1889, however, so Gustave Eiffel ascended the tower’s stairs with a few hardy companions and raised an enormous French tricolor on the structure’s flagpole. Fireworks were then set off from the second platform. Eiffel and his party descended, and the architect addressed the guests and about 200 workers. In early May, the Paris International Exposition opened, and the tower served as the entrance gateway to the giant fair.

The Eiffel Tower remained the world’s tallest man-made structure until the completion of the Chrysler Building in New York in 1930. Incredibly, the Eiffel Tower was almost demolished when the International Exposition’s 20-year lease on the land expired in 1909, but its value as an antenna for radio transmission saved it. It remains largely unchanged today and is one of the world’s premier tourist attractions.
...History.com

Going with the Canon model, http://cp.c-ij.com/jp/contents/CNT-0011187/index.html
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