Author Topic: 1/16 British Saladin Armoured Car project  (Read 3234 times)

Dave Winfield

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Re: 1/16 British Saladin Armoured Car project
« Reply #44 on: July 05, 2016, 05:11:17 PM »
Tires continued...

After the sidewalls are assembled using the three rings and two tabbed joiner strips,
there are two very thin rings that need to be attached.

These are raised surface details on the real tires.
The outermost raised ring also borders the edge of the Tread pattern.

Anyway, some delicate cutting and careful gluing...



...
Surface details (raised rings) installed on both sides,
I am also burnishing the inside of the Tires (now that the glue is dry)
and smoothing out the curved shape of the Tires.

You can see (in the background) I have started to cut out the Tread strip.
And that ring just behind the Tire is the center ring that will support the edge of the Wheel Rims.
One ring is installed on either side of the completed Tire.



...
Cutting out the Tread pattern is a pain in the....
I have already started simplifying the pattern! lol
Those curves are small and tight...feel free to angle them off a bit.

Oh, and don't forget to edge colour!
Up to now, I have been edge colouring my parts with some Gray markers.
Not too worried about bleed, I think it adds to the rubber effect.



...
The Tread is installed by wrapping the part around the Tire and gluing ONLY the center strip (to the Tire).

It is EXTREMELY important to line up the center strip on top of the center seam of the Tire.
I rushed my build, got a little off center, and it affects how the side Treads will fit.
Not a disaster...but definitely not the way it should be.

The Tread strip fitted the diameter nicely, I actually had to trim about .5mm to get a good connection.
(The glue wets the paper, and allows the paper to stretch a little.)



...
I let the Tire sit overnight, to make sure all connections were secure...especially the Tread strip.
Then I carefully glued down each Tread part.

I just lifted each one a little bit, wiped some glue on the underside, and then pressed it down
while forming it over the edge of the Tire, and onto the sidewall.
I held it in place for a few seconds and moved on to the next one.

There are 34 Treads on either side, I did them all in about 3 minutes.



...
Next step is to build a Wheel Rim to be installed from both sides of the Tire.
It will also contain the central Hub that will mount to the Suspension parts.

I'm not planning on allowing the wheels to rotate, although I don't think it would be too difficult to do.



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Vermin King

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Re: 1/16 British Saladin Armoured Car project
« Reply #45 on: July 05, 2016, 05:47:00 PM »
This all seems very reasonable on a model-quality model.  I've had as many as 11 pieces for a tire and wheel before on 'toys'.  I think this is very reasonable.  I also like that you have the seam running down the center to aid with alignment.  That 11-piece tire I mentioned would have gone smoother with a center-line.

Looks really good so far. 
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Dave Winfield

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Re: 1/16 British Saladin Armoured Car project
« Reply #46 on: July 06, 2016, 03:18:34 PM »
Finishing up this Wheel for now....
the back side of the Wheel Rim may change...along with the center Hub,
but for now I needed something to start building the Suspension onto.

Each Wheel Rim face is an inset Disc, and a raised outer edge Disc.
(Theres also a thin raised detail edge on the outer Disc)

These are attached to a central Tube...the Rim itself... which is made up of three layers:
a central spacer strip...the Rim itself...and an outer (hidden reinforcing layer).

The entire Rim mounts onto the tube "Axle/Hub"...the Hub extends out from the wheel,
and also extends at the rear (for Suspension attachment).



...
I can attach the outer face of the Rim before fitting the Rim into the Tire.
But the reverse side has to be attached after the Rim fitted to the Tire.

During assembly my Tire has become a little wider than the Rim...
I guess Tires will vary a little depending on the fit of all the Tire parts.
So a small amount of pressure is needed to attach the opposite Rim face.



...
Care must be taken not to crush the Tire.
Since this is my first attempt, I applied a little too much force and dented the backside of my Tire.
Obviously this is something that has to be discovered by trial and error.
I'll take more care with the next five tires!

But the Wheel looks good from the outside...I'll be able to use this one, if its not damaged during further testing.

Wheel Rim diameter is about 32mm 
(at 1/16 scale, that works out to 512mm or 20 inch...Tire size is labeled as 12.00 x 20)

Overall Tire dia. is 64mm 
(1/16 = 1024mm / 40")







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Dave Winfield

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Re: 1/16 British Saladin Armoured Car project
« Reply #47 on: July 11, 2016, 09:22:49 AM »
Did a bit of redesigning on that Wheel/Tire.
I felt that the overall diameter was correct (scalewise)...but for some reason it looks too small up against the vehicle.
Probably just an illusion.
But, there is a newer tire style...I went with the original Dunlops on the early Mk.2s...that is slightly taller.
So, I bumped up the diameter of the Tire (not the Rim) about 3-4mm.
Just enough to visually fill out the wheel space a bit more.

At the same time, I made some necessary modifications to the Wheel Rim and Hub.
Shorter rear section of the Hub, changed the wheel offset at the rear, adjusted diameters, etc.



...
I forgot about some additional photos...taken during the final assembly, of the final design, of the Fender parts.
Figured you might be interested in seeing them, so...




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Dave Winfield

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Re: 1/16 British Saladin Armoured Car project
« Reply #48 on: July 25, 2016, 07:54:30 PM »
Okay, next step is to replace those wooden "axles" with the proper paper tubes.
Normally, these tubes will be constructed at the beginning of the Hull build.
(I just hadn't got around to designing them yet)
And the tubes will stay in place throughout the build as part of the Hull alignment.
The recommended hole sizes for the Hull (internal and external) are 5mm.
Its best to leave the holes a bit small...make your axles...and then sand out the holes to fit the axles.

Well, to be honest, you can roll a paper or card tube, if you want,
but my recommendation in the kit will be to use a wooden dowel and wrap a paper skin around it.
That way you get a straight strong axle with even dimensions.

So, the paper part has four wrap sections...printed on regular weight paper...it will wrap four times around a dowel.
The final result is a 5mm diameter axle...or so.
You will need about a 4mm dowel.
If the dowel is bigger, you can just cut off some of the paper part, and wrap less sections around the dowel.
Each wrap adds about .25mm to your axle diameter. (So, 4 wraps is about 1mm)



...
Dry wrap the dowel, and adjust as necessary.
Sand the dowel and/or cut off the required amount of paper.
When you are sure the final wrap measures aclose to 5mm, start attahcing your paper to the dowel.
I glued a thin edge strip, aligning the paper with the dowel as straight as possible.

Allow it to dry completely, and then start gluing about 5mm of paper, and tightly wrapping the dowel.
Keep wrapping, 5-10mm at a time, making sure the wrap is staying straight.
Eventually you get to the end, glue it down, and burnish it smooth.



...
Use dowels that are longer thean needed...and cut off the unused ends when you are done.

The paper wraps have all various bands to indicate the position of certain other parts.
The axles themselves will be completely hidden from view.
The paper wrap is mainly just for reference and part placement.

Measure the final Axle and sand/drill out the holes in the Hull parts to accomodate.
It needs to be snug, but not so tight that you can't remove the Axle.



...
I've decided to follow the same wrapping approach with the side Torsion Bar Rods and Tubes assembly.
I'll explain in the next post.
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Dave Winfield

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Re: 1/16 British Saladin Armoured Car project
« Reply #49 on: July 25, 2016, 08:18:25 PM »
Jumping back ahead, to the Suspension stuff...

after much discussion and deliberation...and hair pulling...
I have decided to leave it up to the builder. LOL
But with my recomendation.

I am going to include a simple part wrap for those side  Torsion Rods/Tubes.
The entire assembly will be in two parts with a simple joiner tube at the center.

The wrap is a single tube wrap with some extra internal wraps.
You can print this on cardstock and roll it into tubes if you have the skills.
Otherwise, the recommendation will be to print the part on regular weight papers
and wrap the part around a wooden dowel.

The part has some extra wrap sections (4 in all) just like the Axle tubes mentioned earlier.
The final tube must be 3mm in diameter...so if you wrap the entire part around a dowel,
you will need a 2mm dowel.
Just like the Axles, you can wrap less sections if you are using a larger diameter dowel.

...
In my arsenal of wooden dowels, I have two packets of Wood Craft Dowels listed as 1.5mm diameter.
I remember buying these because 1.5mm diameter is pretty small...smaller than Toothpicks.
And, as you can see, a whole pack was only .99cents.
And they're almost 8" long...which is perfect for this part.



...
Another reason they are perfect for this part, is because they are not 1.5mm diameter!
They actually measure at 2.16mm or thereabouts.

It pays to check things carefully.



...
So, a little sanding will bring them down a little closer to 2mm...and smooth out the rough spots.

Lets start wrapping!



...
Once again, I glue a thin narrow edge to the dowel, aligning it with the dowel (straight).
This is crucial, to keep the wrap going straight around the dowel.

Once the edge has dried and is secure, I will start wrapping and gluing narrow sections
until the entire dowel is wrapped in paper.
The four sections should wrap the dowel up to 3mm...and I have added a couple of extra millimetres for overlap at the end.

There are two tubes to roll, each slightly different in pattern and length.
I'll cut off the excess dowel once the wraps are complete.


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Dave Winfield

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Re: 1/16 British Saladin Armoured Car project
« Reply #50 on: July 26, 2016, 10:41:27 AM »
Here's the completed side Torsion Bar/Rod/Tube assembly.

The enlarged bits are separate wraps added after the main tube is rolled/wrapped around a dowel.
The double/taller wraps are where the the mounting brackets go (to the Hull) along with the upper Control Arms.
And the lower/wider wraps are where the three Tension Adjustors will attach.

You can see the "joiner" tube on the right, attaching the two Torsion Tube parts.



...
I like the look.  And, it all  fits within the size constraints.

I don't have photos, but throughout the construction of these parts, I was thinking about Looker's suggestion.
I started to like the idea of creating six smaller tubes representing the thinner Torsion Rods and larger supporting tubes.
Shorter tubes would be easier to roll, less material to work with.

So I mocked up some parts and printed some test pieces.
First problem was connecting the tubes...I had to make them longer so that they overlapped a bit more.
Then I had trouble making matching tubes exactly the right size so that they all fit together with the correct tightness.
I had to reroll a couple of times.

I realized I still had to add all the wraps and bracketry, so that hasn't changed.
And the entire Tube and Rod assembly wasn't as stiff and rigid enough for my liking.
I was going to try it with dowels inside for support...
but that just convinced me to go back to the first plan, with two tubes wrapped onto dowels.

It was a good idea...made me think...but my idea of two tubes and a joiner seems to be working quite well,
so thats the route I'm taking.


...
The first big change I made (to my Rod/Tube plan) was altering the Hull mounting brackets.

Cutting out the very small bracket parts was challenging enough, but then cutting out 3mm holes was even tougher.
The plan was to slide the brackets (onto the Torsion Tubes) and they could rotate as necessary.
I would do the same with the Tension Adjustor brackets.

Cutting the mounting holes was tricky and the brackets had very thin edges around the mounting holes.
It took a lot of effort not to damage or tear the parts.
I found I had to enlarge the parts (5-6mm diameter) to allow more material for the mounting holes.
But then the parts wre getting too big.

So, I decided to cut the brackets down and just attach them from one side of the Torsion Rods.
I added the thinner, larger wraps and the brackets fit against them.
Cutting out the brackets is a LOT simpler, even if they are small.



...
With the position of the bracketry marked on the Hull sides, its easy enough just to glue the half brackets into place.
Five of them on either side.



...
Then line it up and glue the Torsion Rod assembly to the brackets.

It pays to check the bracket fit against the wraps on the Torsion Rod assembly.
I had to sand out a few of them to get a better fit.



...
I also forgot to mention the end wraps on the Tube assembly.
Seals up the ends of the Tubes that cover the Torsion Rods.
There are small discs capping the ends of the Tubes as well.



Next, I tackle the Tension Adjustors..lots of very small parts!!


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Dave Winfield

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Re: 1/16 British Saladin Armoured Car project
« Reply #51 on: July 26, 2016, 12:31:36 PM »
I did the same thing with the tension Adjusters...
eliminated the need for cutting out a hole in the brackets.
I cut off the back end of the bracket...it now just fits against the Torsion Rods.

The tensioner is quite small.
1/16 is not that big sometimes!

It is complicated in that it has many parts...seven in all...with some of those requiring
two sides, double layer, or laminating to 1mm thickness.
But its a fairly straightforward assembly needing no special skill.
Tweezers and magnifying glasses come in handy though.

You have to assemble three adjusters, with their base plates, for each side of the vehicle.



...
Install the Adusters by aligning them with the three wide wraps on the Torsion Rods,
butt the bracket arms against the wraps on the Torsion Rods,
and swing the Adjuster into place against the Hull sides.
Glue the base plates to the Hull plates.



...
It really completes the Torsion Tubes/Rods!


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Dave Winfield

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Re: 1/16 British Saladin Armoured Car project
« Reply #52 on: August 02, 2016, 09:42:04 AM »
Catching up...
I'm in the middle of assembling the Suspension parts,
so for the past few days I have been cutting out lots of parts.

At first, I finished my design for the Wheel attachment
(axle, axle joints, Control Arms, Shock mounts, Suspension knuckles, etc)
and I did a test build...
then made numerous changes until I was satisifed.

I have a few photos from that test build that I will mix up into a story here
and I will show things as I take new photos (as the new parts progress).

Following on from the last posted point, its time to wrap the axles.
The axle supports already inserted in the Hull have markings on them for reference.
A short section must be rolled, glued, and then slipped into place on the axle supports.
This is an easy part to roll and assemble.
I did mine on a matching size dowel...I wrapped and glued the part into a tube,
then removed it from the dowel...ready to slip onto the axle.


*In the upper right of the photo, you can see the assembled CV Joints/Boots ready to test fit.

This provides mating points for the inner and outer axle jBoots (Constant Velocity Joints)
and covers the only visible section of the axles.



...
The inner CV Joint (Boot) also includes the protruding housing from the Hull.
It caps and seals the inner area of the axles as they exit the Hull.
The inner Joints are assembled using two fine rings(hoops) that connect and attach to a Base ring
creating the entire CV Joint Boot with the angled base that fits against the Hull.

I wrapped a dowel with a paper strip (to the correct size) to aid in forming and gluing the Boot parts.



...
After the entire inner CV Joint part is assembled, I coated the insides with more craft glue for strength.
Once dry, I slipped it over the axle support tube...and over the axle wraps...and lined it up against the Hull side.
I edge glued it into place.



...
The outer CV Joint will connect to the larger Wheel Hub (the center of the Wheel Rim).
It will be fitted last, after the suspension parts are assembled.

But for now, I will prepare it.

First, supporting discs have to be installed in the Hub part.
The discs have to be sized to snugly fit inside the Hub tubes.
They also have to fit neatly over the axle support tubes...they must slide easily onto the axle tubes, so not too tight.

The two supporting discs (laminated to 1mm thickness) are installed inside the Hub.
Theres a rough position suggested...and I created a simple tool for inserting the the discs into the Hubs.
Just wrapped some paper around a dowel.



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First support Disc goes in quite deep...the second, not so deep.
I swiped glued around the inside of the Hub, and inserted the disc, making sure it stayed level.
Its important to make sure glue dries before moving on with many of these assemblies.





...
Then, theres a third disc...which provides more axle support, but is mainly a mounting "cap" for the CV Joint.



...
Now, add the outer CV Joint (Boot).
It Glues flat to the "cap" on the Hub.

The Boot is assembled the same as the inner Boot....two rings make up the rounded rubber Boot shape
and a third hoop part is the Joint housing.

As I said, the Hubs with CV Joints attached will be installed much later.


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Dave Winfield

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Re: 1/16 British Saladin Armoured Car project
« Reply #53 on: August 02, 2016, 10:44:03 AM »
The aim with the suspension parts is to create something that resembles the real thing
but is as simple as possible to assemble.

Since the axles are fixed tubes, the suspension does not have to function
....it does not have to move or support anything.

But the scale size still demands a certain level of detail.

This was a frustrating challenge, figuring out how to break the whole suspension assembly
down into 4 or 5 simpler assemblies.
But after a few discarded ideas, I came up with this one.

Please keep in mind, there are still tweaks going on.
I've already modified the Control Arms and many measurements.
But heres the basics so far...

...
Upper and Lower Control Arms are the swiveling (up and down) suspension arms.
Uppers are basically all the same...so I'll go with one design.
The Lower Control Arms are all very similar with one main difference...the Shock Absorber mounts.
So, I have created one Arm with three variations: no shock brackets, one shock bracket and two shock brackets.

All the Arms assemble the same way...cut out the larger main part.
Glue in place the double layered Side parts (four on each Lower Arm).



...
Then curve, shape and glue in place, the end tabs, to complete the shape of the Control Arm.

As I mentioned, I have already made some changes to these Control Arms.
Slight size and shape adjustments, as well as shortening the wrap around end tabs.

but the basic pattern is still the same.





...
The Lower Control Arms will connect to the Hull with these small brackets.

Since the Control Arms do not swivel/move, they won't need any pins or connectors.
They will be pushed into the gaps in the brackets and glued in place.



...

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Dave Winfield

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Re: 1/16 British Saladin Armoured Car project
« Reply #54 on: August 02, 2016, 10:58:10 AM »
I'll show the assembly of the upper control arms later, since they have been through a few changes.
But you can see the Arms in this (next) pic.

I'll also detail the assembly of the suspension Knuckle, since it has changed too.

For now, heres the first test build, of the first successful assembly.
Note the diagram...one of my original plans for the suspension assemblies.
I'll need to use this (to glue the Arms and Knuckle in the correct angles).



...
As I mentioned before, these parts do not move or swivel, so they are friction fitted together and glued in place.
This creates one assembly (from three) which fits around the Axle and is glued to the Hull mounts.





...
My first test fit on to the vehicle showed me that I have positioned the Lower Control Arm incorrectly.
I'll need to readjust the postion of parts.

But, I am happy with the overall look.



...
The Hub, with the outer CV Joint, will mount onto the Axle, and fit through the center of the Knuckle.





...
From this angle you can see how  the Knuckle needs to be adjusted to vertical.
This is easily done by repositioning the attachments of the Upper and Lower Control Arms to the Knuckle.
Move each about 1-2mm inwards/outwards, and it should straighten up the Knuckle.



...
But, as I said, the overall look is good.
Once I get the parts tweaked and the Knuckle position sorted, it will be as good as it gets.



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