Author Topic: April (2016)  (Read 1230 times)

Vermin King

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April (2016)
« on: April 01, 2016, 02:14:56 PM »
April 1, 1918 RAF Founded



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On April 1, 1918, the Royal Air Force (RAF) is formed with the amalgamation of the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) and the Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS). The RAF took its place beside the British navy and army as a separate military service with its own ministry.

In April 1911, eight years after Americans Wilbur and Orville Wright made the first flight of a self-propelled, heavier-than-air aircraft, an air battalion of the British army’s Royal Engineers was formed at Larkhill in Wiltshire. The battalion consisted of aircraft, airship, balloon, and man-carrying kite companies. In December 1911, the British navy formed the Royal Naval Flying School at Eastchurch, Kent. In May 1912, both were absorbed into the newly created Royal Flying Corps, which established a new flying school at Upavon, Wiltshire, and formed new airplane squadrons. In July 1914, the specialized requirements of the navy led to the creation of RNAS.

One month later, on August 4, Britain declared war on Germany and entered World War I. At the time, the RFC had 84 aircraft, and the RNAS had 71 aircraft and seven airships. Later that month, four RFC squadrons were deployed to France to support the British Expeditionary Force. During the next two years, Germany took the lead in air strategy with technologies like the manual machine gun, and England suffered bombing raids and frustration in the skies against German flying aces such as Manfred von Richthofen, “The Red Baron.” Repeated German air raids led British military planners to push for the creation of a separate air ministry, which would carry out strategic bombing against Germany. On April 1, 1918, the RAF was formed along with a female branch of the service, the Women’s Royal Air Force. That day, Bristol F.2B fighters of the 22nd Squadron carried out the first official missions of the RAF.

By the war’s end, in November 1918, the RAF had gained air superiority along the western front. The strength of the RAF in November 1918 was nearly 300,000 officers and airmen, and more than 22,000 aircraft. At the outbreak of World War II, in September 1939, the operational strength of the RAF in Europe had diminished to about 2,000 aircraft.

In June 1940, the Western democracies of continental Europe fell to Germany one by one, leaving Britain alone in its resistance to Nazi Germany. Nazi leader Adolf Hitler planned an invasion of Britain and in July 1940 ordered his powerful air force–the Luftwaffe–to destroy British ports along the coast in preparation. The outnumbered RAF fliers put up a fierce resistance in the opening weeks of the Battle of Britain, leading the Luftwaffe commanders to place destruction of the British air fleet at the forefront of the German offensive. If the Germans succeeded in wiping out the RAF, they could begin their invasion as scheduled in the fall.

During the next three months, however, the RAF successfully resisted the massive German air invasion, relying on radar technology, more maneuverable aircraft, and exceptional bravery. For every British plane shot down, two Luftwaffe warplanes were destroyed. In October, Hitler delayed the German invasion indefinitely, and in May 1941 the Battle of Britain came to an end. British Prime Minister Winston Churchill said of the RAF pilots, “Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.”

By the war’s end in 1945, the strength of the RAF was nearly one million personnel. Later, this number was reduced and stabilized at about 150,000 men and women.
...History.com

Although there were more than 150 aircraft of various makes and several airships, I'm going to point to probably the most famous aircraft in the RAF stable, the Sopwith Camel.  At Ecardmodels, a search for the Camel brings up some other aircraft, too, http://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/catalogsearch/result/?q=Sopwith+Camel

Makes me wonder which aircraft has the most models available.  You can also pick up a Camel at FiddlersGreen and many other sites
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Vermin King

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Re: April (2016)
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2016, 09:32:55 AM »
April 2, 1914  Alec Guiness Born



Oh, wait, that's the model, and you can get it here:  http://noturnosukhoi.blogspot.com/2014/09/star-wars-ben-kenobi-ep-ivpapercraft.html
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Vermin King

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Re: April (2016)
« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2016, 09:11:55 PM »
April 3, 1924  Marlon Brando Born

Happy Birthday, Marlon, may I offer you a horse's head.

Yes, another recycle post, but I got back late from Kathy's birthday party...



You can find him here:  http://noturnosukhoi.blogspot.com/2012/09/don-corleone-godfatherpapercraft.html
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Vermin King

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Re: April (2016)
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2016, 07:10:11 PM »
April 4, 1943 Flight of Lady Be Good



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4 April 1943: A brand-new crew with a brand new airplane, assigned to the 514th Bombardment Squadron, 376th Bombardment Group, Ninth Air Force, departed Soluch Field (now, Benina International Airport) on their first combat mission, a night attack on Naples, Italy. First Lieutenant William J. Hatton, USAAF, and his crew of eight men were flying a Consolidated B-24D-25-CO Liberator, serial number 41-24301. They would never be seen alive again.

High winds and poor visibility broke up the 25-plane formation, and eventually only two made it all the way to Naples, arriving over the city at about 7:50 p.m. Bad weather made bombing difficult, so the B-24s dropped their bombs into the Mediterranean Sea and started home. By this time, Lieutenant Hatton and his men were alone.

The flight crew became lost on the return flight and overflew their home base. They  continued south into the darkness of the desert night. Eventually, the bomber began to run out of fuel. When two of the four engines stopped, the nine men bailed out into the darkness. The pilots had trimmed the bomber to fly with just two engines operating before abandoning their airplane.The B-24 continued south on its own.

15 years later an oil exploration team discovered the wreckage of 41-24301 in the Calanscio Sand Sea of the Libyan Sahara Desert. The Lady Be Good had come to earth 440 miles (708 kilometers) south of its base at Soluch.
... from This Day in Aviation History



You can get your own model of the Lady Be Good at http://papermodelshop.com/html/b-24_lib.html

Vintage Modeler's build is shown below


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Vermin King

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Re: April (2016)
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2016, 01:59:39 PM »
April 5, 1950 Marshall Mars Destoyed by Fire and Sinks



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While on a test flight following an engine change, a United States Navy Martin JRM-3 Mars seaplane, Marshall Mars, Bu. No. 76822, suffered an engine fire (inboard, left wing) and made an emergency landing at Ke’ehi Lagoon, off Diamond Head, Hawaii, 5 April 1950. The airplane’s crew was rescued but the airplane exploded and sank.

The wreck was discovered on the sea floor in August 2004 at a depth of approximately 1,400 feet (427 meters).

The Martin JRM Mars was a large four-engine flying boat transport built by the Glenn L. Martin Company for the U. S. Navy. Only five were built, designated JRM-1, with the last one being a JRM-2. Each airplane was given an individual name derived from the names of island chains in the Pacific Ocean: Marianas Mars, Hawaii Mars, Philippine Mars, Marshall Mars and Caroline Mars. These were used to transport personnel and cargo between the West Coast of the United States and the Hawaiian Islands. All were upgraded to JRM-3.
... This Day in Aviation

You can grab Aaron's model at http://cadbest.com/store/en/?search=martin mars&pid=480&p=1
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Vermin King

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Re: April (2016)
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2016, 01:13:14 PM »
April 6, 1968 2001: A Space Odyssey Released



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On this day in 1968, Stanley’s Kubrick’s science-fiction classic 2001: A Space Odyssey makes its debut in movie theaters.

Kubrick had first gained prominence as a director for the World War I-era drama Paths of Glory (1957). After helming the big-budget Roman epic Spartacus (1960), he made a 1962 screen adaptation of Vladimir Nabokov’s novel Lolita before turning to an even more controversial topic–nuclear warfare–in the darkly bizarre satire Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964). In the spring of 1964, Kubrick met with Arthur C. Clarke, a former officer in the Royal Air Force and chairman of the British Interplanetary Society, who had begun a full-time science-fiction writing career in 1951. Over the next year, Clarke and Kubrick worked closely to adapt the former’s short story “The Sentinel” into a movie screenplay as well as a full-length novel. Clarke also worked as a general scientific adviser on the film.

Originally entitled A Journey Beyond the Stars, Kubrick’s film was released in April 1968 as 2001: A Space Odyssey. Jumping seamlessly from Africa in the Pleistocene Era to a space-shuttle cabin some 4 million years later, the film clocked in at around three hours and contained less than 40 minutes of dialogue. Stretches of absolute silence or of the sound of human breathing (mimicking the external and internal experience of being inside a space suit) were interspersed with grand orchestral scores, including work by both Richard and Johann Strauss. Kubrick intended 2001 to be a primarily visual–rather than verbal–experience, and the scarcity of dialogue and languid pacing only enhanced the impact of the film’s impressive visual effects.

Though 2001 received many negative reviews when it was released–The New Yorker’s Pauline Kael, for one, called it “monumentally unimaginative”–its prestige grew over the years and it is now regarded by many as Kubrick’s masterwork and one of the most significant films of the 20th century. Its sweeping visual style and psychedelic special effects directly influenced space blockbusters such as George Lucas’ Star Wars movies. At the 41st annual Academy Awards in April 1969, the film did not receive a nomination for Best Picture, though Kubrick was nominated in the Best Director category; he lost to Sir Carol Reed for Oliver! Of four nominations, 2001 won one Oscar, for Best Visual Effects.
...History.com

Two models today from Gary Pilsworth.  The Spaceplane can be found at http://jleslie48.com/gallery_models_scifi.html .
The Moonbus can be found at http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/vbdownloads.php?do=download&downloadid=86
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Vermin King

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Re: April (2016)
« Reply #6 on: April 07, 2016, 01:34:18 PM »
April 7, 1945 Yamato Sank



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On this day in 1945, the Japanese battleship Yamato, ostensibly the greatest battleship in the world, is sunk in Japan’s first major counteroffensive in the struggle for Okinawa.

Weighing 72,800 tons and outfitted with nine 18.1-inch guns, the battleship Yamato was Japan’s only hope of destroying the Allied fleet off the coast of Okinawa. But insufficient air cover and fuel cursed the endeavor as a suicide mission. Struck by 19 American aerial torpedoes, it was sunk, drowning 2,498 of its crew.
... History.com

The sinking of the Yamato has come to be symbolic of the end of the Japanese Empire.

You can find the model at http://digitalnavy.com/Yamato.html

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Vermin King

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Re: April (2016)
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2016, 09:59:58 AM »
Spring Break!

Actually, I am having to take my business in a different direction right now.  Between contracting, certifications, general and product training and generally having to re-configure my life, I think it is best if I set this aside for a while.

I was going to commit to more sporadic postings for a while, but I believe a complete break until life settles is the best bet.

I will be back, but I can't  give a time frame.  My first guess is that I should have things in place before summer (I'd better!)

See you then
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kndeckhand

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Re: April (2016)
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2016, 01:55:32 PM »
Good luck. I'll miss your postings.

Vermin King

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Re: April (2016)
« Reply #9 on: April 09, 2016, 03:40:54 PM »
They will be back.  If you haven't gone through the archive, most days will have a post in previous years
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Dave Winfield

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Re: April (2016)
« Reply #10 on: April 10, 2016, 04:32:48 PM »
DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!