Author Topic: June (2016)  (Read 1809 times)

Vermin King

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Re: June (2016)
« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2016, 02:27:10 PM »
Well, I still couldn't find a model of Paul Newman's Porsche from his 2nd place finish at Lemans, so...

June 10, 1969 First (and Last) X-15 Given to Smithsonian



Not last one built, but the one that made the last flight.

The U.S. Air Force gave the first North American Aviation X-15, serial number 56-6670, to the Smithsonian Institution for display at the National Air and Space Museum.

The first of three X-15A hypersonic research rocketplanes built by North American for the Air Force and NASA, 56-6670 made the first glide flight and the first and last powered flights of the X-15 Program. It made a total of 82 of the 199 X-15 flights.

Scott Crossfield, North American’s Chief Engineering Test Pilot, made the first unpowered flight 8 June 1959 and the first powered flight, 17 September 1959. NASA Research Test Pilot William H. “Bill” Dana made the last flight on 24 October 1968.

Over at ecardmodels, you can find Ken West's X-15, but I'm going to feature Mike Bauer's Stomp Rocket
http://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/x-15-stomp-rocket.html

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Vermin King

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Re: June (2016)
« Reply #12 on: June 13, 2016, 01:39:21 PM »
June 13, 1381, Peasant Army Marches on London



Quote
During the Peasants’ Revolt, a large mob of English peasants led by Wat Tyler marches into London and begins burning and looting the city. Several government buildings were destroyed, prisoners were released, and a judge was beheaded along with several dozen other leading citizens.

The Peasants’ Revolt had its origins in a severe manifestation of bubonic plague in the late 1340s, which killed nearly a third of the population of England. The scarcity of labor brought on by the Black Death led to higher wages and a more mobile peasantry. Parliament, however, resisted these changes to its traditional feudal system and passed laws to hold down wages while encouraging landlords to reassert their ancient manorial rights. In 1380, peasant discontent reached a breaking point when Parliament restricted voting rights through an increase of the poll tax, and the Peasants’ Revolt began.

In Kent, a county in southeast England, the rebels chose Wat Tyler as their leader, and he led his growing “army” toward London, capturing the towns of Maidstone, Rochester, and Canterbury along the way. After he was denied a meeting with King Richard II, he led the rebels into London on June 13, 1381, burning and plundering the city. The next day, the 14-year-old king met with peasant leaders at Mile End and agreed to their demands to abolish serfdom and restrictions on the marketplace. However, fighting continued elsewhere at the same time, and Tyler led a peasant force against the Tower of London, capturing the fortress and executing the archbishop of Canterbury.

On June 15, the king met Tyler at Smithfield, and Tyler presented new demands, including one calling for the abolishment of church property. During the meeting, the mayor of London, angered at Tyler’s arrogance in the presence of the king, lunged at the rebel leader with a sword, fatally wounding him. As Tyler lay dying on the ground, Richard managed to keep the peasant mob calm until the mayor returned with armed troops. Hundreds of rebels were executed and the rest dispersed. During the next few days, the Peasant Revolt was put down with severity all across England, and Richard revoked all the concessions he had made to the peasants at Mile End. For several weeks, Wat Tyler’s head was displayed on a pole in a London field.
... History.com

This was news to me.  I never knew that the Tower of London was ever out of the Crown's control.  For the model, let's go to Canon, http://cp.c-ij.com/jp/contents/CNT-0011749/index.html
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Vermin King

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Re: June (2016)
« Reply #13 on: June 14, 2016, 12:42:01 PM »
June 14, 1940 Germany Occupies Paris



Quote
On this day in 1940, Parisians awaken to the sound of a German-accented voice announcing via loudspeakers that a curfew was being imposed for 8 p.m. that evening-as German troops enter and occupy Paris.

British Prime Minister Winston Churchill had tried for days to convince the French government to hang on, not to sue for peace, that America would enter the war and come to its aid. French premier Paul Reynaud telegrammed President Franklin Roosevelt, asking for just such aid-a declaration of war, and if not that, any and all help possible. Roosevelt replied that the United States was prepared to send material aid—and was willing to have that promise published—but Secretary of State Cordell Hull opposed such a publication, knowing that Hitler, as well as the Allies, would take such a public declaration of help as but a prelude to a formal declaration of war. While the material aid would be forthcoming, no such commitment would be made formal and public.

By the time German tanks rolled into Paris, 2 million Parisians had already fled, with good reason. In short order, the German Gestapo went to work: arrests, interrogations, and spying were the order of the day, as a gigantic swastika flew beneath the Arc de Triomphe.

While Parisians who remained trapped in their capital despaired, French men and women in the west cheered-as Canadian troops rolled through their region, offering hope for a free France yet.

The United States did not remain completely idle, though. On this day, President Roosevelt froze the American assets of the Axis powers, Germany and Italy.
...History.com

I know that I've seen photos of the swastika under the Arc de Triomphe, but couldn't locate it.

For the model, we'll go with the Arc de Triomphe from Canon, http://cp.c-ij.com/jp/contents/CNT-0019318/index.html (swastika not included)

I can't help but think about the total despair Parisians must have felt, or how any people would feel seeing their world taken over by a foreign power and unable to do a thing about it.  A tableau that has played out time and time again in history
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Vermin King

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Re: June (2016)
« Reply #14 on: June 15, 2016, 01:38:09 PM »
June 15, 1986 Richard Petty's 1000th Start



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On this day in 1986, driving legend Richard Petty makes the 1,000th start of his National Association for Stock Car Racing (NASCAR) career, in the Miller American 400 in Brooklyn, Michigan. He became the first driver in NASCAR history to log 1,000 career starts.

Petty grew up on the NASCAR circuit: His father was Hall of Fame driver Lee Petty, one of stock car racing’s pioneers and a three-time winner of the Grand National championship in the 1950s. At the age of 12, young Richard became his father’s crew chief, but he was not allowed to drive until 1958, when he turned 21. Richard and Lee Petty both raced in the inaugural Daytona 500 the following year; Lee won the event, while Richard’s engine blew after only eight laps. By the late 1960s, however, Richard Petty had become the dominant figure in stock car racing. He won his first Daytona 500 in 1964, two years after his father was knocked out of racing after a near-fatal crash. In 1967, Petty won 27 of the 48 races he started–including a record 10 straight victories–and finished in the top five of 11 others to capture the Grand National title for a second time.

During the 1970s, Petty won five Winston Cups and four Daytona 500s, and was known for his fierce rivalry with the driver David Pearson, who edged Petty out after a collision in the last lap at Daytona in 1976. Ulcers caused Petty to have 40 percent of his stomach removed in late 1978; he came back to win another Daytona 500 two months later. He scored his last career victory–his 200th–at the Firecracker 400 in 1984, two days after his 47th birthday.

On June 15, 1986, at the Michigan International Speedway, Bill Elliott beat Harry Gant (who had come back from serious injuries after a crash a week earlier) to win the Miller American 400. The race will go down in history, however, as Richard Petty’s 1000th career start. (Some controversy exists as to whether the race was his 1,000th or 999th career start, due to varied record keeping and statistics procedures over the years.)

Dubbed “The King,” the enormously popular Petty retired in 1992, having racked up a dominant list of records including first all-time in wins (200), races started (1,184), top-five finishes (555), top-10 finishes (712), pole positions (126), laps completed (307,836), laps led (52,194), races led (599), and consecutive races won (10).
...History.com

Shoot!  Wasn't even able to identify any photos of the car he drove in that race.  So for the model, I'm going with the movie 'Cars' tribute to the King from Webdude's archive, https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0By3a5MPIUqbOczZzVmF4SFlIQm8&usp=sharing&tid=0By3a5MPIUqbOejhGUHc0dkdOMUk

And, yes, that is from his archive posted on PM.com a year or so ago, so it isn't pirated.  The pirated versions are easier to locate, unless you know where to look...
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Vermin King

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Re: June (2016)
« Reply #15 on: June 16, 2016, 12:28:54 PM »
Jun 16, 1858 Lincoln's House Divided Speech

On June 16, 1858, more than 1,000 Republican delegates met in the Springfield, Illinois, statehouse for the Republican State Convention. At 5:00 p.m. they chose Abraham Lincoln as their candidate for the U.S. Senate, running against Democrat Stephen A. Douglas. At 8:00 p.m. Lincoln delivered this address to his Republican colleagues in the Hall of Representatives. The title reflects part of the speech's introduction, "A house divided against itself cannot stand," a concept familiar to Lincoln's audience as a statement by Jesus recorded in all three synoptic gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke).

 Even Lincoln's friends regarded the speech as too radical for the occasion. His law partner, William H. Herndon, believed Lincoln was morally courageous but politically incorrect. Lincoln read the speech to him before delivering it, referring to the "house divided" language this way: "The proposition is indisputably true ... and I will deliver it as written. I want to use some universally known figure, expressed in simple language as universally known, that it may strike home to the minds of men in order to rouse them to the peril of the times."

 Reflecting on it several years later, Herndon said, "Through logic inductively seen, Lincoln as a statesman, and political philosopher, announced an eternal truth -- not only as broad as America, but covers the world."

 Another lawyer, Leonard Swett, said the speech defeated Lincoln in the Senate campaign. In 1866 he wrote to Herndon complaining, "Nothing could have been more unfortunate or inappropriate; it was saying first the wrong thing, yet he saw it was an abstract truth, but standing by the speech would ultimately find him in the right place."

You can find your own Illinois Statehouse at https://www2.illinois.gov/ihpa/Preserve/Pages/construct_OSC.aspx
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Vermin King

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Re: June (2016)
« Reply #16 on: June 17, 2016, 03:31:31 PM »
June 17, 1986 Last Flight of the B-47



Quote
After being returned to flyable condition, B-47E-25-DT Stratojet serial number 52-166, made the very last flight of a B-47 when it was flown by Major General John D. Moore and Lieutenant Colonel Dale E. Wolfe, U.S. Air Force, from the Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake in the high desert of Southern California, to Castle Air Force Base in California’s San Joaquin Valley, to be placed on static display. 52-166 had been built by the Douglas Aircraft Company at Tulsa, Oklahoma, in 1952.

52-166 had not been flown in twenty years, having sat in the Mojave Desert serving as a radar target. General Moore and Colonel Wolf were experienced B-47 pilots, though they hadn’t flown one in the same twenty years. Because the B-47 it had not been through a complete overhaul prior to the ferry flight, it was decided to leave the landing gear extended to avoid any potential problems.

During the 43 minute trip, the aircraft had several systems fail, including airspeed sensors, intercom, and partial aileron control. On approach to Castle Air Force Base, a 16 foot (4.9 meters) braking parachute was deployed. This created enough aerodynamic drag to slow the airplane while the early turbojet engines were kept operating at high power settings. These engines took a long time to accelerate from idle, making a go-around a very tricky maneuver. With the braking chute, though, releasing the chute allowed the airplane to climb out as the engines were already operating at high r.p.m.

Designed by Boeing, the Stratojet was a high-subsonic speed strategic bomber and reconnaissance aircraft, in service from 1951 until 1977. A total of 2,032 B-47s were built by a consortium of aircraft manufacturers: Boeing Airplane Company, Wichita, Kansas; Douglas Aircraft Company, Tulsa, Oklahoma; Lockheed Aircraft Company, Marietta, Georgia. The Stratojet was one of the most influential aircraft designs of all time and its legacy can be seen in almost every jet airliner built since the 1950s: The swept wing with engines suspended on pylons. They served the United States Air Force from 1951 to 1977. From the first flight of the Boeing XB-47 Stratojet prototype, 17 December 1947, to the final flight of B-47E 52-166, was 38 years, 6 months, 1 day.
...This Day in Aviation

You can get your own Stratojet at http://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-72-b-47e-stratojet.html
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Re: June (2016)
« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2016, 08:48:05 PM »
June 18, 1981 Lockheed YF-117A Nighthawk First Flight



At 6:05 a.m., Pacific Daylight Time (1305 UTC), the first Full Scale Development Lockheed YF-117A Nighthawk, 79-10780, made its first flight at Groom Lake, Nevada with Skunk Works test pilot Harold “Hal” Farley, Jr. at the controls. The super-secret airplane was made of materials that absorbed radar waves, and built with the surfaces angled so that radar signals are deflected away from the source.

There are a number of F-117 models out there, but I see none in the desert camo.  http://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-50-lockheed-f-117a-nighthawk-stealth-fighter-paper-model.html
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Re: June (2016)
« Reply #18 on: June 19, 2016, 04:28:30 PM »
June 19, 1954 Mary Kathleen Turner Born



Yeah, she's done some good movies, but when I see her name mentioned, the first thing that comes to mind is Jessica Rabbit.

http://papermike.blogspot.com/2015/05/jessica-rabbit.html
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Re: June (2016)
« Reply #19 on: June 20, 2016, 05:49:15 PM »
June 20, 1837 Victoria Becomes Queen



I believe she is the only British monarch to have an era named after her.

Tough day for finding historical items with matching models.  I was looking for the SS Savannah since it was the first steam-powered ship to cross any ocean.  No luck.  Most of the other stories ended up with no models.  So, went back to see what I'd posted earlier.  Eh.

So, if Dave feels like updating his Big Penny to a more British feel, here's a couple images



I wonder when her image first appeared on a coin ...

There seems to be a little disagreement on the first, but there is a copy of an 1839 at http://www.britishcoingallery.com/victoria/
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Vermin King

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Re: June (2016)
« Reply #20 on: June 21, 2016, 04:50:37 PM »
June 21, 1979 Chris Pratt Born



Okay, I actually enjoyed Guardians of the Galaxy (probably because I wasn't expecting much).  There's also a Dancing Groot out there, but that wasn't Chris's character, so for the model, we'll do his tape deck from the ship, https://davesgeekyideas.com/2014/08/14/guardians-of-the-galaxy-cassette-player-papercraft/

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Re: June (2016)
« Reply #21 on: June 22, 2016, 01:28:15 PM »
June 22, 2008 George Carlin Dies



Quote

On this day in 2008, the influential comic writer, actor and stand-up comedian George Carlin dies of heart failure at the age of 71.

Born in New York City, Carlin dropped out of high school and joined the Air Force. While stationed in Shreveport, Louisiana, he got a job as a radio disc jockey; after his discharge, he worked as a radio announcer and disc jockey in Boston and Fort Worth, Texas. Carlin and his early radio colleague, Jack Burns, formed a moderately successful stand-up comedy duo, appearing in nightclubs and on The Tonight Show with Jack Paar. They soon parted ways, and Carlin made his first solo appearance on The Tonight Show in 1962. Three years later, he began a string of performances on The Merv Griffin Show and was later hired as a regular on Away We Go, 1967’s summer replacement for The Jackie Gleason Show. Carlin cemented his early career success with the release of his debut comedy album, the well-reviewed Take-Offs and Put-Downs, that same year.

During the late 1960s, Carlin had a recurring role on the sitcom That Girl, starring Marlo Thomas, and made numerous TV appearances on shows such as The Ed Sullivan Show and Johnny Carson’s Tonight Show. Seeking to make a leap into big-time stardom, the relatively clean-cut, conventional comic reinvented himself around 1970 as an eccentric, biting social critic and commentator. In his new incarnation, Carlin began appealing to a younger, hipper audience, particularly college students. He began dressing in a stereotypically “hippie” style, with a beard, long hair and jeans, and his new routines were punctuated by pointed jokes about religion and politics and frequent references to drugs.

Released in 1972, Carlin’s second album, FM/AM, won a Grammy Award for Best Comedy Recording. A routine from his third hit album, Class Clown (also 1972) grew into the comic’s now-famous profanity-laced routine “Seven Words You Can Never Say on Television.” When it was first broadcast on New York radio, a complaint led the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to ban the broadcast as “indecent.” The U.S. Supreme Court later upheld the order, which remains in effect today. The routine made Carlin a hero to his fans and got him in trouble with radio brass as well as with law enforcement; he was even arrested several times, once during an appearance in Milwaukee, for violating obscenity laws.

More popular than ever as a countercultural hero, Carlin was asked to be the first guest host of a new sketch comedy show, Saturday Night Live, in 1975. Two years later, he starred in the first of what would be 14 comedy specials on the cable television station HBO (the last one aired in March 2008). Carlin had a certain degree of success on the big screen as well, including a supporting role in Outrageous Fortune (1987), a memorable appearance in Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure (1989) and a fine supporting turn in the drama The Prince of Tides (1991). More recently, he played a Roman Catholic cardinal in Kevin Smith’s satirical comedy Dogma (1999).

Though a 1994 Fox sitcom, The George Carlin Show, lasted only one season, Carlin continued to perform his HBO specials and his live comedy gigs into the early 21st century. He also wrote best-selling books based on his comedy routines, including Brain Droppings (1997), Napalm & Silly Putty (2001) and When Will Jesus Bring the Pork Chops? (2004). According to his obituary in the New York Times, Carlin gave his last live comedy show in Las Vegas just weeks before his death.
...History.com

Gonna go with Dave's Fillmore model, http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/cartoonz.html

If you build it, you'll never have to remember Carlin's birthday, because it's the number on the license plate '51237'.
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