Author Topic: July (2016)  (Read 1740 times)

Vermin King

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July (2016)
« on: July 01, 2016, 03:17:26 PM »
July 1, 1867 British North America Act of 1867



Quote
The autonomous Dominion of Canada, a confederation of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and the future provinces of Ontario and Quebec, is officially recognized by Great Britain with the passage of the British North America Act.

During the 19th century, colonial dependence gave way to increasing autonomy for a growing Canada. In 1841, Upper and Lower Canada–now known as Ontario and Quebec–were made a single province by the Act of Union. In the 1860s, a movement for a greater Canadian federation grew out of the need for a common defense, the desire for a national railroad system, and the necessity of finding a solution to the problem of French and British conflict. When the Maritime provinces, which sought union among themselves, called a conference in 1864, delegates from the other provinces of Canada attended. Later in the year, another conference was held in Quebec, and in 1866 Canadian representatives traveled to London to meet with the British government.

On July 1, 1867, with passage of the British North America Act, the Dominion of Canada was officially established as a self-governing entity within the British Empire. Two years later, Canada acquired the vast possessions of the Hudson’s Bay Company, and within a decade the provinces of Manitoba and Prince Edward Island had joined the Canadian federation. In 1885, the Canadian Pacific Railway was completed, making mass settlement across the vast territory of Canada possible.
... History.com

While not really Independence, Canada received autonomy for internal affairs, and the structure of government was put in place.  I think the British handled this well, even though they drug their feet on Canada being able to set foreign policy, having legislative action approved by the British Parliament, etc.  I wonder how much the U.S. Civil War played a part in this, having such a big war taking place on your borders.  And then part of the foot-dragging may have been not really wanting to be fully independent at the time.

However the views on this may differ, Canada got their form of government with this act.  And were allowed to bring in other British Territories to eventually form the Canada of today.  I'm so thankful for our neighbor to the north.

Happy Canada Day!

Okay, it isn't Canadian, but if Parliament hadn't passed the act, it wouldn't happen, so http://cp.c-ij.com/jp/contents/CNT-0010401/index.html

Feel free to post a more Canadian model
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wag

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2016, 06:12:32 PM »
They have the same model on their English page
http://cp.c-ij.com/en/contents/CNT-0010399/index.html
Wayne

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2016, 06:47:37 PM »
Cool.  I just have the Japanese site bookmarked, since there are more models on it than on the English site
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2016, 12:46:30 PM »
July 2, 1943 First Tuskegee Airman Shoots Down Enemy Plane



1st Lieutenant Charles B. Hall, USAAF, 99th Fighter Squadron, was the first of the famous “Tuskegee Airman” to shoot down an enemy airplane during World War II. At the time the 99th was based at El Haouaria Airfield in Tunisia and was patrolling the coast of Sicily. The squadron’s primary mission was ground attack.

On 2 July, however, they were escorting North American B-25 Mitchell medium bombers near Castelventrano, Italy. Enemy fighters intercepted the flight.

“It was my eighth mission and the first time I had seen the enemy close enough to shoot him. I saw two Focke-Wulfs following the bombers just after the bombs were dropped. I headed for the space between the fighters and bombers and managed to turn inside the Jerries. I fired a long burst and saw my tracers penetrate the second aircraft. He was turning to the left, but suddenly fell off and headed straight into the ground. I followed him down and saw him crash. He raised a big cloud of dust.”

Charles Hall was flying a Curtiss P-40L Warhawk, a variant of the famous fighter that was produced in limited numbers.

Where there are a lot of P-40 models out there, I am not finding this variant.  If you would like to build a P-40, you can find one at http://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/catalogsearch/result/index/?p=5&q=curtiss+p+40&x=10&y=14, or http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/aircraft/Curtiss-P40-Warhawk.html

Getting ready to head out of town, so I'm recycling old posts for today, tomorrow and Monday
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2016, 12:47:39 PM »
July 3  Summer Blockbuster Release Day

I guess Hollywood likes to take advantage of the Fourth of July holiday.

Movies released:
Despicable Me 2 released, 2013
The Amazing Spider-Man released, 2012
Transformers released, 2007
Men In Black released, 2002
Terminator 2 released, 1991
Back to the Future released, 1985

I think we will go with the oldest one on this list, Back to the Future


http://www7a.biglobe.ne.jp/~sf-papercraft/sf/delorean.html

You'll have to use Wayback Machine to get the models, however
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2016, 12:49:10 PM »
July 4, 1776  The United States Declare Their Independence

I'm in a bit of a hurry as I am heading out of town for the long weekend, so today's model is Gary Dare's Fourth of July P-51 from Fiddlers Green.



You can find it at http://cardmodelers.net/models/july4th/july4th-p51.html

See you again Tuesday
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2016, 10:02:08 PM »
July 5, 1927 FAI Altitude Record


Quote
Less than one year after learning to fly an airplane, Lady Bailey, with Mrs. Geoffrey de Havilland (the former Miss Louise Thomas) as a passenger, took off from the de Havilland airfield at Stag Lane, Edgeware, London, England, and climbed to an altitude of 5,268 meters (17,283 feet) setting a Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) World Record for multi-place light aircraft. (Mrs. de Havilland is listed as “crew” in the FAI record.)

Lady Bailey was flying Captain Geoffrey de Havilland’s personal airplane, a DH.60X Moth, construction number 276, registration G-EBQH.

FAI Record File Num #8221 [Direct Link]
 Status: ratified – superseded since approved
 Region: World
 Class: C (Powered Aeroplanes)
 Sub-Class: C 1st category 1927-1931 (Multiplaces < 400 kg, Light Landplane)
 Category: General
 Group: Not applicable
 Type of record: Altitude
 Performance: 5 268 m
 Date: 1927-07-05
 Course/Location: Edgware (UK)
 Claimant The Hon. Bailey (GBR)
 Crew Mrs G. DE HAVILLAND
 Aeroplane: De Havilland DH Moth
 Engine: 1 Cirrus Engines Cirrus II

Lady Bailey was born Mary Westenra, daughter of the 5th Baron Rossmore. She married Sir Abe Bailey at the age of 20. Soon after becoming a licensed pilot in early 1927, she flew across the Irish Sea, the first woman to do so. After her World Record altitude flight, she set several long distance solo flight records, including an 8,000-mile flight from Croydon, South London to Cape Town, South Africa with a DH.60 Cirrus II Moth, G-EBSF, and an 18,000-mile return flight made with another DH.60 (after G-EBSF was damaged). These were the longest solo flight and the longest flight by a woman to that time.

Lady Bailey was twice awarded the Harmon Trophy. In 1930, she was created Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire. During World War II, The Hon. Dame Mary Bailey, DBE, served with the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force with the rank Section Officer. She died 29 July 1960 at the age of 70.

G-EBQH was a prototype for the de Havilland DH.60 Cirrus II Moth, and was powered by an air-cooled, normally-aspirated 304.66-cubic-inch-displacement (4.993 liter) A.D.C. Cirrus Mark II four-cylinder vertical inline engine. This was a right-hand tractor, direct-drive, overhead-valve engine with two valves per cylinder and a compression ratio of 4.9:1. It had a normal power rating of 75 horsepower at 1,800 r.p.m. and a maximum power rating of 80 horsepower at 2,000 r.p.m. It drove a two-bladed, fixed-pitch propeller. The Cirrus Mk.II was 3 feet, 9.3 inches (1.151 meters) long, 1 foot, 7 inches wide (0.483 meters) and 2 feet, 11.6 inches (0.904 meters) high. It weighed 280 pounds (127 kilograms).

G-EBQH was used as a factory demonstrator and test aircraft. The DH.60X crashed in February 1928 but was rebuilt and later sold. It was flown in the King’s Cup Air Races of 1927, 1928 and 1929 by Alan S. Butler, the chairman of de Havilland. The prototype was modified to a single-place configuration with a Cirrus Mark III engine, and was known as the Moth Special. In the 1929 race, it set the fastest time for a light aircraft.

Records indicate that G-EBQH changed ownership a number of times. Its Certificate of Airworthiness expired in 1937 and its status is not known.
...This Day in Aviation



I probably spent too much time trying to find photos of the actual plane and the appropriate model, and this is as close as I could get, https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-48-d-h-60-cirrus-moth-g-eblv.html
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2016, 02:06:41 PM »
July 6, 1946 Sylvester Stallone Born



And, of course, My three favorite models from Judge Dredd are by Jan Rukr, http://aliens.humlak.cz/aliens/aliens_papirove_modely/bonus-lawgiver_gb.html

The 1:1 Lawgiver, a badge and the Book of Law


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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2016, 05:30:42 PM »
July 7, 1907 Robert A. Heinlein Born



Okay, I've looked up too many stories today.  This is the second guy born in Butler, Missouri, but I don't remember who the other one was. 

Heinlein, Asimov and Clarke.  Where would modern Sci Fi be without them? 

I don't know if you have actually read Starship Troopers, but if you are a Heinlein fan, you would be outraged with the movie.  Even so, today's model is by Jim Hartman depicting the Warrior Bug.  http://www.onemonk.com/onemonk-dl.html. Scroll down.  Some of Jim's models were among the first paper models I ever built.  Have fun
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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2016, 05:39:54 PM »
July 8, 1980 Prototype F-15 Strike Eagle First Flight



Quote
The prototype McDonnell Douglas F-15 Strike Eagle, a fighter-bomber variant converted from the second two-seat F-15B Eagle trainer, F-15B-4-MC 71-0291, made its first flight.

The Strike Eagle was begun as a private venture by McDonnell Douglas. Designed to be operated by a pilot and a weapons system officer (WSO), the airplane can carry bombs, missiles and guns for a ground attack role, while maintaining its capability as an air superiority fighter.
... This Day in Aviation History

I really like that European 1 livery, but if you want it, you are going to have to get out a paint program.  Actually, I couldn't find many F-15's, and most of those were in Japanese colors and only one F-15E.  So here's a link to an F-15E, and let's see who can mod this up.  http://paper-replika.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=5906:f-15e-idolmaster-chihaya-kisaragi-papercraft&catid=132:aircraft&Itemid=206833
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #10 on: July 09, 2016, 03:24:31 PM »
July 9, 1944 Medal of Honor Action



Quote
MEDAL OF HONOR

PUCKET, DONALD D. (Air Mission)

Rank and organization: First Lieutenant, U.S. Army Air Corps, 98th Bombardment Group.

Place and date: Ploesti Raid, Rumania, 9 July 1944.

Entered service at: Boulder, Colo. Birth: Longmont, Colo.

G.O. No.: 48, 23 June 1945.

Citation: He took part in a highly effective attack against vital oil installation in Ploesti, Rumania, on 9 July 1944. Just after “bombs away,” the plane received heavy and direct hits from antiaircraft fire. One crewmember was instantly killed and 6 others severely wounded. The airplane was badly damaged, two engines were knocked out, the control cables cut, the oxygen system on fire, and the bomb bay flooded with gas and hydraulic fluid. Regaining control of his crippled plane, 1st Lt. Pucket turned its direction over to the copilot. He calmed the crew, administered first aid, and surveyed the damage. Finding the bomb bay doors jammed, he used the hand crank to open them to allow the gas to escape. He jettisoned all guns and equipment but the plane continued to lose altitude rapidly. Realizing that it would be impossible to reach friendly territory he ordered the crew to abandon ship. Three of the crew, uncontrollable from fright or shock, would not leave. 1st Lt. Pucket urged the others to jump. Ignoring their entreaties to follow, he refused to abandon the 3 hysterical men and was last seen fighting to regain control of the plane. A few moments later the flaming bomber crashed on a mountainside. 1st Lt. Pucket, unhesitatingly and with supreme sacrifice, gave his life in his courageous attempt to save the lives of 3 others.

[Note: Records available online do not indicate the specific variant or serial number of the B-24 Liberator flown by 1st Lieutenant Pucket, however research revealed that there were two B-24s lost by the 98th Bombardment Group on 9 July 1944. They were both North American/Dallas-built B-24G-15-NT Liberators, serial numbers 42-78346 and 42-78348. The B-24 in the photograph below is their sister ship, 42-78349.]
...This Day in Aviation





Dave's got a lot of B-24's at http://papermodelshop.com/html/b-24_lib.html.  I don't think that there are any G's out there though.  I'm not really sure about the differences
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