Author Topic: July (2016)  (Read 2256 times)

Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2016, 04:38:53 PM »
July 10, 1940 Battle of Britain Begins



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Before Germany could mount Operation Sea Lion, a cross-channel invasion of the British Isles, it needed to have complete air superiority over the invasion fleet. Because of the Luftwaffe‘s greater numbers and modern aircraft, German military leadership believed this could best be accomplished by defeating the Royal Air Force in air-to-air combat.

The Royal Air Force had been conserving their limited numbers of pilots and aircraft up to this point in the war. Germany’s plan was to send its bombers against targets that the R.A.F. would be forced to defend. The Messerschmitt Bf-109s (also referred to as Me 109) and Focke-Wulf Fw-190s would then shoot down the Boulton Paul Defiants and Bristol Blenheims. But the Hawker Hurricanes and Supermarine Spitfires were up to the task. While the Hurricanes went after the Luftwaffe’s Dorneir 17 and Heinkel He 111 bombers, the Spitfires engaged their Me 109 and Fw 190 fighter escorts.

Britain used a system of radar-directed ground control of its fighter squadrons. The result was that, though both sides lost about the same number of aircraft, the Battle of Britain was a decisive victory for Great Britain. Germany gave up on the plans for an invasion of England.

During a speech the House of Commons, 20 August 1940, Prime Minister Winston Churchill referred to the pilots of Fighter Command when he said, “The gratitude of every home in our Island, in our Empire, and indeed throughout the world, except in the abodes of the guilty, goes out to the British airmen who, undaunted by odds, unwearied in their constant challenge and mortal danger, are turning the tide of the world war by their prowess and by their devotion. Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.” Ever since, the Royal Air Force has been known as “The Few.”
... This Day in Aviation

Dave has a number of Spitfires, but I think they are mostly later models than the Mk I, so I'm going to direct you to a search I did on 'Battle of Britain' at Ecardmodels.com, http://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/catalogsearch/result/?q=battle+of+britain&x=0&y=0.  Not all of the models will apply, but you can find a number of aircraft from each side in this search
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2016, 04:07:27 PM »
July 11, 1979 Skylab Crashes to Earth



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Parts of Skylab, America's first space station, come crashing down on Australia and into the Indian Ocean five years after the last manned Skylab mission ended. No one was injured.

Launched in 1973, Skylab was the world's first successful space station. The first manned Skylab mission came two years after the Soviet Union launched Salynut 1, the world's first space station, into orbit around the earth. However, unlike the ill-fated Salynut, which was plagued with problems, the American space station was a great success, safely housing three separate three-man crews for extended periods of time.

Originally the spent third stage of a Saturn 5 moon rocket, the cylindrical space station was 118 feet tall, weighed 77 tons, and carried the most varied assortment of experimental equipment ever assembled in a single spacecraft to that date. The crews of Skylab spent more than 700 hours observing the sun and brought home more than 175,000 solar pictures. They also provided important information about the biological effects of living in space for prolonged periods of time.

Five years after the last Skylab mission, the space station's orbit began to deteriorate--earlier than was anticipated--because of unexpectedly high sunspot activity. On July 11, 1979, Skylab made a spectacular return to earth, breaking up in the atmosphere and showering burning debris over the Indian Ocean and Australia.
  History.com

https://www.space.com/21122-skylab-space-station-remains-museum.html

I particularly got a kick out of the oversized check on display.  The good folks of Esperanza fined NASA for littering, and a radio station sent them a check to pay the fine that NASA ignored.

John J.'s version of Skylab can be found at http://jleslie48.com/gallery_models_apollo.html

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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #13 on: July 13, 2016, 02:37:50 PM »
July 13, 1942 Harrison Ford Born



Hmmm... Star Wars, Indiana Jones, Ender’s Game, Cowboys & Aliens, Blade Runner

Let's go with Indiana Jones this year

You can find Indiana at http://ninjatoes.wordpress.com/2007/10/31/indiana-jones/

Headpiece of the Staff of Ra is at http://tektonten.blogspot.com/2009/02/indiana-jones-papercraft-ra-staff.html

Webley Mk VI Revolver is at http://tektonten.blogspot.com/2012/01/indiana-jones-papercraft-webley-mk-vi.html

Petra Treasury is at http://papermau.blogspot.com/2012/04/petra-treasure-jordania-by-papermau.html

BV-38 Flying Wing is at http://myhobbycraft.blogspot.com/2010/05/bv-38-flying-wing-172.html

That should keep everyone busy for a while
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #14 on: July 14, 2016, 08:34:13 PM »
14 July 1789 Revolutionaries Storm the Bastille



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Parisian revolutionaries and mutinous troops storm and dismantle the Bastille, a royal fortress that had come to symbolize the tyranny of the Bourbon monarchs. This dramatic action signaled the beginning of the French Revolution, a decade of political turmoil and terror in which King Louis XVI was overthrown and tens of thousands of people, including the king and his wife Marie Antoinette, were executed.

The Bastille was originally constructed in 1370 as a bastide, or “fortification,” to protect the walled city of Paris from English attack. It was later made into an independent stronghold, and its name–bastide–was corrupted to Bastille. The Bastille was first used as a state prison in the 17th century, and its cells were reserved for upper-class felons, political troublemakers, and spies. Most prisoners there were imprisoned without a trial under direct orders of the king. Standing 100 feet tall and surrounded by a moat more than 80 feet wide, the Bastille was an imposing structure in the Parisian landscape.

By the summer of 1789, France was moving quickly toward revolution. There were severe food shortages in France that year, and popular resentment against the rule of King Louis XVI was turning to fury. In June, the Third Estate, which represented commoners and the lower clergy, declared itself the National Assembly and called for the drafting of a constitution. Initially seeming to yield, Louis legalized the National Assembly but then surrounded Paris with troops and dismissed Jacques Necker, a popular minister of state who had supported reforms. In response, mobs began rioting in Paris at the instigation of revolutionary leaders.

Bernard-René Jordan de Launay, the military governor of the Bastille, feared that his fortress would be a target for the revolutionaries and so requested reinforcements. A company of Swiss mercenary soldiers arrived on July 7 to bolster his garrison of 82 soldiers. The Marquis de Sade, one of the few prisoners in the Bastille at the time, was transferred to an insane asylum after he attempted to incite a crowd outside his window by yelling: “They are massacring the prisoners; you must come and free them.” On July 12, royal authorities transferred 250 barrels of gunpowder to the Bastille from the Paris Arsenal, which was more vulnerable to attack. Launay brought his men into the Bastille and raised its two drawbridges.

On July 13, revolutionaries with muskets began firing at soldiers standing guard on the Bastille’s towers and then took cover in the Bastille’s courtyard when Launay’s men fired back. That evening, mobs stormed the Paris Arsenal and another armory and acquired thousands of muskets. At dawn on July 14, a great crowd armed with muskets, swords, and various makeshift weapons began to gather around the Bastille.

Launay received a delegation of revolutionary leaders but refused to surrender the fortress and its munitions as they requested. He later received a second delegation and promised he would not open fire on the crowd. To convince the revolutionaries, he showed them that his cannons were not loaded. Instead of calming the agitated crowd, news of the unloaded cannons emboldened a group of men to climb over the outer wall of the courtyard and lower a drawbridge. Three hundred revolutionaries rushed in, and Launay’s men took up a defensive position. When the mob outside began trying to lower the second drawbridge, Launay ordered his men to open fire. One hundred rioters were killed or wounded.

Launay’s men were able to hold the mob back, but more and more Parisians were converging on the Bastille. Around 3 p.m., a company of deserters from the French army arrived. The soldiers, hidden by smoke from fires set by the mob, dragged five cannons into the courtyard and aimed them at the Bastille. Launay raised a white flag of surrender over the fortress. Launay and his men were taken into custody, the gunpowder and cannons were seized, and the seven prisoners of the Bastille were freed. Upon arriving at the Hotel de Ville, where Launay was to be arrested by a revolutionary council, the governor was pulled away from his escort by a mob and murdered.

The capture of the Bastille symbolized the end of the ancien regime and provided the French revolutionary cause with an irresistible momentum. Joined by four-fifths of the French army, the revolutionaries seized control of Paris and then the French countryside, forcing King Louis XVI to accept a constitutional government. In 1792, the monarchy was abolished and Louis and his wife Marie-Antoinette were sent to the guillotine for treason in 1793.

By order of the new revolutionary government, the Bastille was torn down. On February 6, 1790, the last stone of the hated prison-fortress was presented to the National Assembly. Today, July 14–Bastille Day–is celebrated as a national holiday in France.
...History.com

You can find Patricia's vintage model of the Bastille at http://bibigreycat.blogspot.com/2010/07/le-chateau-de-la-bastille-en-1789-merci.html
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #15 on: July 15, 2016, 05:45:44 PM »
July 15, 1933 Wiley Post Starts Around-the-World Solo Flight



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Wiley Hardeman Post took off from Floyd Bennett Field, Long Island, New York, on a solo around-the-world flight. His airplane was a single-engine high wing monoplane, a Lockheed Model 5C Vega, NR105W, which he previously flown around the world with navigator Harold Gatty. On this flight, he flew approximately the same route around the Northern Hemisphere, making 11 stops over a 15,596 mile (25,099.3 kilometer) flight. He returned to Floyd Bennett Field on 22 July 1933, after 7 days, 18 hours, 49 minutes. This was the first solo around-the-world flight.

The Winnie Mae was built by Lockheed Aircraft Company at Burbank, California in 1930. It had been purchased by an Oklahoma oilman, F.C Hall, and named after his daughter, Winnie Mae of Oklahoma. Wiley Post flew the Winnie Mae for Hall, and later purchased the airplane. He used it to set several speed records and to compete in the National Air Races. NR105W was sold to the Smithsonian Institution by Mrs. Post in 1936, following Wiley Post’s death.
... This Day in Aviation

You can get your own Winnie Mae at http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/aircraft/Lockheed-Vega.html

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #16 on: July 16, 2016, 03:20:15 PM »
July 16, 1769 Mission San Diego de Alcala Founded



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Father Junipero Serra, a Spanish Franciscan missionary, founds the first Catholic mission in California on the site of present-day San Diego. After Serra blessed his new outpost of Christianity in a high mass, the royal standard of Spain was unfurled over the mission, which he named San Diego de Alcala.

Serra came to Spanish America in 1750 and served in the Sierra Gorda missions and then in south-central Mexico. A successful missionary, he was appointed a member of the second Spanish land expedition to Alta California in 1769. When the party reached San Diego, Serra remained with a few followers to found California’s first mission. The rest of the expedition continued on in search of Monterrey harbor, which had been previously used by Spanish sailors. Although the explorers failed in their aim, Serra succeeded in finding Monterrey in 1770, and there he founded his second mission–San Carlos Barromeo.

Appointed president of the Alta California presidios, Serra eventually founded a total of nine missions, stretching from San Diego to present-day San Francisco. The Franciscan fathers built large communities around their missions, teaching Christianized Native Americans to farm and tend cattle, and directing their work. These agricultural communities enjoyed a considerable autonomy from first the Spanish colonial authorities and then the Mexican government, but with the coming of the Americans in the mid-19th century most were abandoned.
...History.com

Wow, there's a model of the mission out there, but I wish a better one was available.  I picked it up when it was a free model, before they added all of the accessories available for additional cost. I guess $9.95 isn't bad, but since I already got it for free and know what it looks like, I wish it would be upgraded for that cost.  Be that as it may, you can find the model at http://synergyicons.stores.yahoo.net/msandiego.html
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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #17 on: July 18, 2016, 06:18:42 PM »
July 18, 1942 First Pure Jet Flight of Me 262



The first test flights of the Me 262 began on 18 April 1941, with the Me 262 V1 example, bearing its Stammkennzeichen radio code letters of PC+UA, but since its intended BMW 003 turbojets were not ready for fitting, a conventional Junkers Jumo 210 engine was mounted in the V1 prototype's nose, driving a propeller, to test the Me 262 V1 airframe. When the BMW 003 engines were installed, the Jumo was retained for safety, which proved wise as both 003s failed during the first flight and the pilot had to land using the nose-mounted engine alone.[1] The V1 through V4 prototype airframes all possessed what would become an uncharacteristic feature for most later jet aircraft designs, a fully retracting conventional gear setup with a retracting tailwheel — indeed, the very first prospective German "jet fighter" airframe design ever flown, the Heinkel He 280, used a retractable tricycle landing gear from its beginnings, and flying on jet power alone as early as the end of March 1941.

The V3 third prototype airframe, with the code PC+UC, became a true jet when it flew on 18 July 1942 in Leipheim near Günzburg, Germany, piloted by Fritz Wendel. This was almost nine months ahead of the British Gloster Meteor's first flight on 5 March 1943. Its retracting conventional gear, a feature shared with the first four Me 262 V-series airframes, caused its jet exhaust to deflect off the runway, with the wing's turbulence negating the effects of the elevators, and the first takeoff attempt was cut short.[29]

On the second attempt, Wendel solved the problem by tapping the aircraft's brakes at takeoff speed, lifting the horizontal tail out of the wing's turbulence. The aforementioned initial four prototypes (V1-V4) were built with the conventional gear configuration. Changing to a tricycle arrangement — a permanently fixed undercarriage on the fifth prototype (V5), with the definitive fully retractable nosewheel gear on the V6 (with Stammkennzeichen code VI+AA) and subsequent aircraft corrected this problem.

You can find Nobi's Me 262 at http://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-48-me262a-1a-schwalbe.html

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Dave Winfield

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #18 on: July 18, 2016, 11:09:33 PM »
Love that Lockheed Vega.
Just a beautiful plane!!
One of my favorites.

And that Me262 is quite amazing to see in person.

Nice posts.
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #19 on: July 20, 2016, 01:53:05 PM »
July 20, 1969 Eagle Has Landed



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102:45:25 Aldrin: “Four forward. Four forward. Drifting to the right a little. Twenty feet, down a half.”

102:45:31 Duke: “Thirty seconds” (until the ‘Bingo’ call).

102:45:32 Aldrin: “Drifting forward just a little bit; that’s good.” (Pause)

102:45:40 Aldrin: “Contact Light.”

102:45:43 Armstrong: “Shutdown”.

102:45:44 Aldrin: “Okay. Engine Stop.”

102:45:45 Aldrin: “ACA out of Detent.”

102:45:46 Armstrong: “Out of Detent. Auto.”

102:45:47 Aldrin: “Mode Control, both Auto. Descent Engine Command Override, Off. Engine Arm, Off. Four-thirteen is in.”

102:45:57 Duke: “We copy you down, Eagle.”

102:45:58 Armstrong: “Engine arm is off. (Pause) Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.”
  This Day in Aviation

There are two LEMs at Lower Hudson Valley.  http://jleslie48.com/gallery_models_apollo.html

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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #20 on: July 21, 2016, 08:06:25 PM »
July 21, 2011 End of Final Shuttle Mission



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On this day in 2011, NASA’s space shuttle program completes its final, and 135th, mission, when the shuttle Atlantis lands at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. During the program’s 30-year history, its five orbiters—Columbia, Challenger, Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour—carried more than 350 people into space and flew more than 500 million miles, and shuttle crews conducted important research, serviced the Hubble Space Telescope and helped in the construction of the International Space Station, among other activities. NASA retired the shuttles to focus on a deep-space exploration program that could one day send astronauts to asteroids and Mars.

In January 1972, two-and-a-half years after America put the first man on the moon in July 1969, President Richard Nixon publicly announced that NASA would develop a space transportation system featuring a space vehicle capable of shuttling “repeatedly from Earth to orbit and back.” Nine years later, on April 12, 1981, at Kennedy Space Center, the first shuttle, Columbia, lifted off on its inaugural mission. Over the course of the next 54 hours, the two astronauts aboard NASA’s first reusable spacecraft successfully tested all its systems and orbited the Earth 37 times before landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California.

In 1983, a second shuttle, Challenger, was put into service. It flew nine missions before breaking apart shortly after the launch of its 10th mission, on January 28, 1986. All seven crew members were killed, including high school teacher Christa McAuliffe, who had won a national contest to be the first U.S. civilian to fly aboard the space shuttle. In the aftermath of the disaster, the shuttle program was grounded until 1988.

The program’s third shuttle, Discovery, made its first flight in 1984. Atlantis entered the fleet in 1985, and was followed by Endeavour in 1992. The shuttle program experienced its second major disaster on February 1, 2003, when just minutes before Columbia was scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center and conclude its 28th mission, it broke apart while re-entering the atmosphere over Texas. All seven astronauts on board perished.

Afterward, the shuttle fleet was grounded until July 2005, when Discovery was launched on the program’s 114th mission. By the time Discovery completed its 39th and final mission (the most of any shuttle) in March 2011, it had flown 148 million miles, made 5,830 orbits of Earth and spent 365 days in space. Endeavour completed its 25th and final mission in June 2011. That mission was commanded by Capt. Mark Kelly, husband of former U.S. congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords.

On July 8, 2011, Atlantis was launched on its 33rd mission. With four crew members aboard, Atlantis flew thousands of pounds of supplies and extra parts to the International Space Station; it was the 37th shuttle flight to make the trip. Thirteen days later, on July 21, Atlantis touched down at Kennedy Space Center at 5:57 a.m., after a journey of more than 5 million miles, during which it orbited the Earth 200 times. Upon landing, the flight’s commander, Capt. Christopher J. Ferguson, said, “Mission complete, Houston. After serving the world for over 30 years, the space shuttle has earned its place in history, and it’s come to a final stop.” During its 26 years in service, Atlantis flew almost 126 million miles, circled Earth 4,848 times and spent 307 days in space. The estimated price tag for the entire space shuttle program, from development to retirement, was $209 billion.

After completing their final missions, the orbiters were sent to museums around the country: Discovery went to the National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Virginia, Endeavour to California Science Center in Los Angeles and Atlantis to Kennedy Space Center. A space shuttle prototype, the Enterprise, is now housed at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum in New York.
... History.com

You can find the shuttle, external fuel tank, solid rocket boosters and payload at http://www.axmpaperspacescalemodels.com/old/download5.html#.WXIaE03rtBo
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #21 on: July 22, 2016, 01:21:46 PM »
July 22, 1933 First Solo Flight Around the World



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Wiley Hardeman Post and his Lockheed Model 5C Vega, NR105W, Winnie Mae of Oklahoma, landed at Floyd Bennett Field, Long Island, New York. He had departed from there on 15 July and in 7 days, 18 hours, 49 minutes, he flew 15,596 miles (25,099.33 kilometers), circling the Northern Hemisphere. He made 11 stops for fuel and rest. In 1931 he had flown approximately the same route with a navigator, Harold Gatty, aboard, but for this flight Post was by himself. This was the first solo around-the-world flight.
This Day in Aviation



I am not familiar with FG's model, except at the bottom of the page there is a Winnie Mae (with extra windows), and there is text about his flights.
You can find FG's model of the Vega at http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/Aircraft/Lockheed-Vega.html
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