Author Topic: July (2016)  (Read 1741 times)

Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #22 on: July 23, 2016, 10:10:02 AM »
July 23, 1953 Maj. Glenn Shoots Down Third MiG During Korean War



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Major John H. Glenn, Jr., United States Marine Corps, shot down his third and final MiG-15 fighter during the Korean War.

Major Glenn had previously flown a Grumman F9F Panther with VMF-311, but was assigned to the U.S. Air Force 25th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, 51st Fighter Interceptor Group, at K13, Suwon, Korea.

While on temporary duty with the Air Force squadron, Glenn flew the North American Aviation F-86F Sabre air superiority fighter. He shot down all three MiG fighters with F-86F-30-NA, serial number 52-4584. His previous victories were on 12 July and 19 July, 1953, also against MiG-15 fighters.

Major Glenn had painted the names of his wife and two daughters on the nose of his airplane, but after being heard complaining that there “weren’t enough MiGs”, he came out one morning to find MIG MAD MARINE painted on the Sabre’s side.
... This Day in Aviation

You can get your own MiG Mad Marine at http://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-48-f-86f-sabre-two-liveries-the-huff-and-mig-mad-marine.html

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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #23 on: July 25, 2016, 02:53:41 PM »
July 25, 1909 English Channel First Flight



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At 4:41 a.m., Louis Charles Joseph Blériot took of from Calais in his own Type XI single-engine monoplane, and flew across the English Channel to Dover. He landed at Northfield Meadow near Dover Castle. Blériot flew at about 250 feet (76 meters) above the water, at approximately 45 miles per hour (72 kilometers per hour).

The airplane did not have a compass, so Blériot used a French destroyer heading toward Dover as a visual reference.  After passing the ship, visibility deteriorated and he was only able to see the water below him. He flew on and after about ten minutes was able to see the coastline ahead.

He realized that the wind had blown him to the east of his intended course so he flew along the shoreline until he recognized a signal marking the landing point. The wind was gusty near the cliffs and he landed harder than intended, slightly damaging his airplane.

This was the first time an airplane had been flown across the English Channel, and brought Blériot international acclaim. Very quickly, orders for his Type XI were coming in.

The Blériot Type XI was a single-seat, single-engine monoplane. It was 24 feet, 11 inches (7.595 meters) long with a wingspan of 27 feet, 11 inches (8.509 meters) and overall height of 8 feet, 10 inches (2.692 meters).

In its original configuration, the airplane was powered by a 35 horsepower (26 kW) 7-cylinder R.E.P. engine (designed by Robert Albert Charles Esnault-Pelterie) driving a four-bladed paddle type propeller. This engine was unreliable and was soon changed for an air-cooled Alessandro Anzani & Co., three-cylinder “fan”-type radial engine (or W-3) and a highly-efficient Chauvière Intégrale two-bladed propeller.

The Blériot XI had an empty weight of 507 pounds (230 kilograms). Maximum speed was 47 miles per hour (76 kilometers per hour) and the service ceiling was (3,280 feet) 1,000 meters.
... This Day in Aviation



You can get your Bleriot XI at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-48-bleriot-xi.html.  I imagine that it would take longer to build than the 36.5 minutes that the flight lasted

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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #24 on: July 26, 2016, 02:10:37 PM »
July 26, 1971, Apollo XV Launch



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At 13:34:06 UTC, the Apollo 15/Saturn V (AS-510) was launched from Launch Complex 39A, Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The three-man flight crew were David R. Scott, Mission Commander, on his third space flight; Alfred M. Worden, Command Module Pilot, on his first mission; and James B. Irwin, Lunar Module Pilot, also on his first space mission. This was the fifth manned lunar landing mission (though Apollo 13 did not land). The destination was the Hadley Rille.

On this flight, NASA was sending a powered wheeled transport vehicle, the Lunar Roving Vehicle, or LRV. This would allow the astronauts on the moon’s surface to travel farther from the landing point, spend less time getting where they were going, and with less physical exertion. They would also be able to return to their space craft with more geologic samples. The emphasis on this flight was to conduct a meaningful scientific examination of the surface. The astronauts had received extensive training in this regard.
...This Day in Aviation

Well, I don't think Ken L. West's model is done yet, and I don't know how to get hold of the Richard Vyskovsky version from ABC (unless you use one of the Chinese pirate sites), so we'll go with the next iteration, Dave's Lunar Cup version at http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/specialz.html

By the way, this is one of the few models that I've had lots of people want, but I haven't parted with it.  It's just too stinking cool
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #25 on: July 27, 2016, 01:06:12 PM »
July 27, 1990  Last 2CV Rolls Off Line



I actually don't know if that is the correct color-scheme for the last one (of all the luck, the only photo I found of the 'last 2CV' was questionable and black and white).  In 1988 production ceased in France but was continued in Portugal. The last official 2CV, a Charleston with chassis number 08KA 4813 PT which was reserved for the Mangualde plant manager Claude Hebert, rolled off the Portuguese production line on 27 July 1990. In all a total of 3,867,932 2CV's were produced. Including the commercial versions of the 2CV, Dyane, Méhari, FAF, and Ami variants, the 2CV's underpinnings spawned 8,830,679 vehicles.

You can find the model at http://web.archive.org/web/20060210065841/http://www1.plala.or.jp/HISA/hoby/paper/hoby5_free.htm



Dangit!  I missed Summer Glau's birthday on the 24th...

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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #26 on: July 29, 2016, 01:15:21 PM »
B-17 She-Hasta Encounters ME-163



The Allies only realized that the ME 163 was operational on the 28th, and the first encounter with it was the 29th.

The Nazis were losing the battle over Germany but they pinned their hopes on technical advances. The ‘vengeance’ weapons, which Hitler had boasted about, which so many Nazis continued to believe would miraculously transform the war, were starting to appear. As well as new Jet fighters was a unique aircraft.

The Messerschmitt Me 163 Komet, the only rocket-powered fighter aircraft ever to become operational, capable of up to 700 mph. Allied intelligence was aware that they had begun flying on the 28th July, and Allied fighters were on the lookout for them. Operationally the speed of the Me 163 proved not to be a great advantage in combat with conventional fighters.

After being heavily damaged by flak, the B-17 She-Hasta was the first encounter with this unusual fighter.  The full story comes from Lt Robert Fulkerson who was Navigator on B-17 Bomber ‘She-Hasta’, flying with the 351st Bomb Squadron, 100th Bomb Group from England:

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July 29, 1944, the 100th Bomb Group target for the day was the Leuna oil refinery at Merseburg, Germany. This mission was the second day in row that the 100th bombed Merseburg. As a navigator with the 351st Squadron, 100th Bomb Group, this was my fourth mission having recently been assigned to the 100th on July 17, 1944. Our Crew was flying the B-17 “She-Hasta”. Bill Greiner was flying as a replacement pilot on his “last” mission and Jim Coccia, our regular pilot, was flying as co-pilot.

Once in Germany and arriving at the IP, we flew to the target at the altitude of 26, 000 feet. As we approached the target, we encountered a very dense, black carpet of flak. The flak was so thick one would think that one could walk on it! We lost one engine as we dropped our bombs and encountered other damage forcing us to leave the formation. The entire low squadron of the 100th A-group failed to return home along with two of the B-group of which we were one, accounting for eight B-17’s lost.

Flak had knocked out the oxygen in the nose of the aircraft forcing the bombardier and me to retreat to the radio room. I had given the one walk around bottle of oxygen to the bombardier and told him to go on to the radio room and that I would follow him. Upon entering the entrance to the bomb bay my parachute harness caught on to something and became entangled. Still being at altitude and without oxygen, I soon passed out. Fortunately for me, John Vuchetich, our flight engineer, who was in the top turret saw me and plugged in my oxygen mask. Upon recovering, I noticed that the bomb bay doors had not completely closed and upon passing out I had dropped most of my navigational aids out the bomb bay doors.

With a map or two I proceeded to the radio room. By this time we had lost a lot of altitude and while limping along, encountered more flak at about 10, 000 feet. Another engine was lost and Bernie Baumgarten, one of our waist gunners, was severely wounded in his abdominal area and upper left leg. Shortly after this, near Weserbunds, Germany, a squadron of P-38’s appeared on the scene. Apparently they had spotted a Me 163 KOMET rocket fighter on our tail. The German pilot, on seeing the squadron leaders P-38, turned in his direction until he saw the squadron leaders wingman and decided to turn away. The P-38’s pursued the Me 163 and the squadron leader made direct hits and the Me 163 went down.

The B-17 was lost and eventually ditched in the North Sea.  The eight surviving crewmen spent four days at sea before being 'rescued' by Germans to spend the next nine months as POW's.

You can find Marek's ME-163 at http://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-50-messerschmitt-me-163-b-1-white-13-paper-model.html
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #27 on: July 30, 2016, 02:28:37 PM »
July 30, 1947 Arnold Schwarzenegger Born



For the model, we'll go with JOssorio's Standee, http://librosgratispapercraftymas.blogspot.com.es/2012/12/the-terminator.html

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Re: July (2016)
« Reply #28 on: July 31, 2016, 05:33:30 PM »
July 31, 1965 J.K. Rowling Born



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On this day in 1965, Joanne Rowling, better known the world over as J.K. Rowling, the author and creator of the celebrated Harry Potter book series, is born near Bristol, England. Beginning in the late 1990s, Rowling’s seven Harry Potter novels became international blockbusters, selling over 400 million copies and being translated into more than 60 languages. The books also spawned a series of movies, video games and other merchandise that made Rowling one of the wealthiest people in the entertainment industry.

Rowling attended England’s University of Exeter, where she studied French, and later worked for human-rights organization Amnesty International in London and as a language instructor in Portugal. The idea for Harry Potter came to Rowling when she was riding a train from Manchester, England, to London in 1990. She began writing the first book that night. Rowling finished the book while living in Edinburgh, Scotland, where she struggled financially as a single mother and battled depression. Her completed manuscript was turned down by a number of publishers before she got a book deal with Bloomsbury Publishing in August 1996.

The first Harry Potter book debuted in Great Britain in 1997 under the title Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. The book was released in the United States the following year and renamed Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. Children and adults alike were captivated by the story of the bespectacled boy wizard Harry, his friends Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger, their adventures at the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry and Harry’s struggles against his enemy, the evil Lord Voldemort.

On November 16, 2001, the first Harry Potter film, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, opened in America and was a huge box-office success. It was directed by Chris Columbus (Home Alone, Mrs. Doubtfire) and starred British child actor Daniel Radcliffe as Harry Potter, Rupert Grint as Ron and Emma Watson in the role of Hermione. A roster of celebrated actors took supporting roles in the film and its various sequels, including Ralph Fiennes, Maggie Smith, Alan Rickman, Emma Thompson, Richard Harris and Gary Oldman.

The seventh and final (according to Rowling’s predetermined plan) Harry Potter novel, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, debuted in U.S. bookstores on July 21, 2007. Like all the previous Harry Potter books, it is slated to become a movie, to be released in 2010. To date, the Harry Potter films are the most financially successful series in history, having surpassed both the Star Wars and James Bond franchises.
... History.com

For the model, I'm going with Harry's wand, which didn't make it through the entire series, but it was the one that chose him, http://paperinside.com/harry-potter/wand/



I'm not sure why they aren't showing Order of the Phoenix on the Harry Potter Birthday Weekend.  They show all those other movies more than once and leave that one out.  Hmmm
There are no strangers in this world ...
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