Author Topic: August (2016)  (Read 1424 times)

Vermin King

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August (2016)
« on: August 01, 2016, 01:53:31 PM »
August 1, 1943 PT-109 Sinks



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On this day in 1943, a Japanese destroyer rams an American PT (patrol torpedo) boat, No. 109, slicing it in two. The destruction is so massive other American PT boats in the area assume the crew is dead. Two crewmen were, in fact, killed, but 11 survived, including Lt. John F. Kennedy.

Japanese aircraft had been on a PT boat hunt in the Solomon Islands, bombing the PT base at Rendova Island. It was essential to the Japanese that several of their destroyers make it to the southern tip of Kolombangara Island to get war supplies to forces there. But the torpedo capacity of the American PTs was a potential threat. Despite the base bombing at Rendova, PTs set out to intercept those Japanese destroyers. In the midst of battle, Japan’s Amaqiri hit PT-109, leaving 11 crewmen floundering in the Pacific.

After five hours of clinging to debris from the decimated PT boat, the crew made it to a coral island. Kennedy decided to swim out to sea again, hoping to flag down a passing American boat. None came. Kennedy began to swim back to shore, but strong currents, and his chronic back condition, made his return difficult. Upon reaching the island again, he fell ill. After he recovered, the PT-109 crew swam to a larger island, what they believed was Nauru Island, but was in fact Cross Island. They met up with two natives from the island, who agreed to take a message south. Kennedy carved the distress message into a coconut shell: “Nauru Is. Native knows posit. He can pilot. 11 alive need small boat.”

The message reached Lieutenant Arthur Evans, who was watching the coast of Gomu Island, located next to an island occupied by the Japanese. Kennedy and his crew were paddled to Gomu. A PT boat then took them back to Rendova. Kennedy was ultimately awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Medal, for gallantry in action.

The coconut shell used to deliver his message found a place in history—and in the Oval Office.

PT-109, a film dramatizing this story, starring Clift Robertson as Kennedy, opened in 1963.
... History.com

Gotta go with Dave's PT-Boat, http://papermodelshop.com/html/elco_pt_boat.html.
Make sure you download the Conversion Kit for PT-109
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Vermin King

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Re: August (2016)
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2016, 01:05:21 PM »
August 2, 1990 Iraq Invades Kuwait



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At about 2 a.m. local time, Iraqi forces invade Kuwait, Iraq’s tiny, oil-rich neighbor. Kuwait’s defense forces were rapidly overwhelmed, and those that were not destroyed retreated to Saudi Arabia. The emir of Kuwait, his family, and other government leaders fled to Saudi Arabia, and within hours Kuwait City had been captured and the Iraqis had established a provincial government. By annexing Kuwait, Iraq gained control of 20 percent of the world’s oil reserves and, for the first time, a substantial coastline on the Persian Gulf. The same day, the United Nations Security Council unanimously denounced the invasion and demanded Iraq’s immediate withdrawal from Kuwait. On August 6, the Security Council imposed a worldwide ban on trade with Iraq.

On August 9, Operation Desert Shield, the American defense of Saudi Arabia, began as U.S. forces raced to the Persian Gulf. Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein, meanwhile, built up his occupying army in Kuwait to about 300,000 troops. On November 29, the U.N. Security Council passed a resolution authorizing the use of force against Iraq if it failed to withdraw by January 15, 1991. Hussein refused to withdraw his forces from Kuwait, which he had established as a province of Iraq, and some 700,000 allied troops, primarily American, gathered in the Middle East to enforce the deadline.

At 4:30 p.m. EST on January 16, 1991, Operation Desert Storm, the massive U.S.-led offensive against Iraq, began as the first fighter aircraft were launched from Saudi Arabia and off U.S. and British aircraft carriers in the Persian Gulf. All evening, aircraft from the U.S.-led military coalition pounded targets in and around Baghdad as the world watched the events transpire on television footage transmitted live via satellite from Iraq. Operation Desert Storm was conducted by an international coalition under the supreme command of U.S. General Norman Schwarzkopf and featured forces from 32 nations, including Britain, Egypt, France, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait.

During the next six weeks, the allied force engaged in an intensive air war against Iraq’s military and civil infrastructure and encountered little effective resistance from the Iraqi air force or air defenses. Iraqi ground forces were helpless during this stage of the war, and Hussein’s only significant retaliatory measure was the launching of SCUD missile attacks against Israel and Saudi Arabia. Saddam hoped that the missile attacks would provoke Israel to enter the conflict, thus dissolving Arab support of the war. At the request of the United States, however, Israel remained out of the war.

On February 24, a massive coalition ground offensive began, and Iraq’s outdated and poorly supplied armed forces were rapidly overwhelmed. By the end of the day, the Iraqi army had effectively folded, 10,000 of its troops were held as prisoners, and a U.S. air base had been established deep inside Iraq. After less than four days, Kuwait was liberated, and the majority of Iraq’s armed forces had either surrendered, retreated to Iraq, or been destroyed.

On February 28, U.S. President George Bush declared a cease-fire, and on April 3 the U.N. Security Council passed Resolution 687, specifying conditions for a formal end to the conflict. According to the resolution, Bush’s cease-fire would become official, some sanctions would be lifted, but the ban on Iraqi oil sales would continue until Iraq destroyed its weapons of mass destruction under U.N. supervision. On April 6, Iraq accepted the resolution, and on April 11 the Security Council declared it in effect. During the next decade, Saddam Hussein frequently violated the terms of the peace agreement, prompting further allied air strikes and continuing U.N. sanctions.

In the Persian Gulf War, 148 American soldiers were killed and 457 wounded. The other allied nations suffered about 100 deaths combined during Operation Desert Storm. There are no official figures for the number of Iraqi casualties, but it is believed that at least 25,000 soldiers were killed and more than 75,000 were wounded, making it one of the most one-sided military conflicts in history. It is estimated that 100,000 Iraqi civilians died from wounds or from lack of adequate water, food, and medical supplies directly attributable to the Persian Gulf War. In the ensuing years, more than one million Iraqi civilians have died as a result of the subsequent U.N. sanctions.
... History.com

Besides the Humvee, two military items came to be known worldwide:  the A-10 Warthog and the SCUD Missile.

For the models, you can find Aaron's A-10 at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-54-a-10-thunderbolt-ii-paper-model.html and you can get your SCUD missile and launcher at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-100-ss-1-scud-b-and-maz-543-paper-model.html
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Vermin King

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Re: August (2016)
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2016, 01:24:09 PM »
August 3, 1977 The Spy Who Loved Me Released



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On this day in 1977, “The Spy Who Loved Me,” starring Roger Moore as the suave superspy James Bond, known for his love of fast cars and dangerous women, is released in theaters across America. The film features one of the most memorable Bond cars of all time–a sleek, powerful Lotus Esprit sports car that does double duty as a submarine. 

As “The Spy Who Loved Me” begins, Bond is sent to investigate the hijacking of British and Soviet submarines loaded with nuclear warheads. To defeat his adversary, shipping tycoon Karl Stromberg (Curt Jurgens), and avert global nuclear war, Bond must free the captured submarines. In one of the film’s key sequences, Bond skillfully maneuvers his Lotus Esprit in order to save himself and his Soviet counterpart, the beautiful KGB agent Anya Amasova (Barbara Bach), from the attacks of Stromberg’s henchmen. With the sultry helicopter pilot Naomi (Caroline Munro) in pursuit along the coastal roads of Sardinia, Bond drives the Lotus off a pier into the ocean. The car transforms into a submarine, complete with tail fins and a periscope, and Bond is able to blast Naomi’s helicopter out of the sky with a sea-to-air missile. 

Two different Lotus Esprits were used in the production of “The Spy Who Loved Me,” including a specially modified model, dubbed “Wet Nellie,” for the filming of the underwater scenes, in Nassau, Bahamas. At the time of filming, the Lotus Esprit was the latest innovation by the Lotus Engineering Company, founded in 1952 by the British engineer and race car driver Anthony Colin Bruce Chapman. After debuting the original styling concept at the Turin Motorshow in 1972, Lotus unveiled the Esprit at the Paris Motor Show in October 1975 and launched its production the following year. Renowned designer Giorgetto Giugiaro (chosen by more than 100 automotive journalists around the world as the winner of the Car Designer of the Century award in 1999) provided the Esprit’s sleek styling. While critics praised the car’s lightweight frame and superior steering and handling, they gave it lesser marks for power, noise and other more minor points.

In 1980, Lotus launched the Esprit Turbo, which made its own star turn in the 1981 Bond movie “For Your Eyes Only.” The company made continued improvements to the Esprit line throughout the next two decades, and in 1992 celebrated the 20th anniversary of the car’s initial introduction in Turin and its place among the world’s fastest and most respected sports cars. Esprit production ended in 2003. 
... History.com

You can get your own Wet Nelly at http://www.paperdiorama.com/paper-models/cars/lotus-esprit-from-1977-james-bond-film-the-spy-who-loved-me/
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Vermin King

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Re: August (2016)
« Reply #3 on: August 04, 2016, 12:33:39 PM »
August 4, 1960 X-15 Unofficial Speed Record



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NASA research test pilot Joseph Albert Walker set an unofficial world speed record when he flew the number one North American Aviation X-15, 56-6670, to 2,195 miles per hour (3,532.5 kilometers per hour). This was the 18th flight of the X-15 Program. It was 56-6670’s eighth flight and Walker’s fourth X-15 flight. The purpose of this test was to gradually increase the rocket plane’s speed toward its design limit.

Airdropped from the Boeing NB-52A Stratofortress mothership, 52-003, over Silver Lake, near the California-Nevada border, at 08:59:13.0 a.m., PDT, Walker fired the X-15’s two Reaction Motors XLR11-RM-13 rocket engines for 264.2 seconds. The X-15 accelerated to Mach 3.31 and climbed to a peak altitude of 78,112 feet (23,809.5 meters). [The two XLR11s were used as an interim powerplant until the Reaction Motors XLR99 was ready. The combined thrust of both LR11s was only slightly more than the idle thrust of the XLR99.]

Walker touched down on Rogers Dry Lake at Edwards Air Force Base, California, after a flight of 10 minutes, 22.6 seconds.
... This Day in Aviation

Seems like I point to this model a lot, but here you go... https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-32-x-15.html
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Re: August (2016)
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2016, 01:05:10 PM »
August 5, 1962 Marilyn Monroe Found Dead



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On August 5, 1962, movie actress Marilyn Monroe is found dead in her home in Los Angeles. She was discovered lying nude on her bed, face down, with a telephone in one hand. Empty bottles of pills, prescribed to treat her depression, were littered around the room. After a brief investigation, Los Angeles police concluded that her death was “caused by a self-administered overdose of sedative drugs and that the mode of death is probable suicide.”

Marilyn Monroe was born Norma Jean Mortenson in Los Angeles on June 1, 1926. Her mother was emotionally unstable and frequently confined to an asylum, so Norma Jean was reared by a succession of foster parents and in an orphanage. At the age of 16, she married a fellow worker in an aircraft factory, but they divorced a few years later. She took up modeling in 1944 and in 1946 signed a short-term contract with 20th Century Fox, taking as her screen name Marilyn Monroe. She had a few bit parts and then returned to modeling, famously posing nude for a calendar in 1949.

She began to attract attention as an actress in 1950 after appearing in minor roles in the The Asphalt Jungle and All About Eve. Although she was onscreen only briefly playing a mistress in both films, audiences took note of the blonde bombshell, and she won a new contract from Fox. Her acting career took off in the early 1950s with performances in Love Nest (1951), Monkey Business (1952), and Niagara (1953). Celebrated for her voluptuousness and wide-eyed charm, she won international fame for her sex-symbol roles in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953), How to Marry a Millionaire (1953), and There’s No Business Like Show Business (1954). The Seven-Year Itch (1955) showcased her comedic talents and features the classic scene where she stands over a subway grating and has her white skirt billowed up by the wind from a passing train. In 1954, she married baseball great Joe DiMaggio, attracting further publicity, but they divorced eight months later.

In 1955, she studied with Lee Strasberg at the Actors Studio in New York City and subsequently gave a strong performance as a hapless entertainer in Bus Stop (1956). In 1956, she married playwright Arthur Miller. She made The Prince and the Showgirl–a critical and commercial failure–with Laurence Olivier in 1957 but in 1959 gave an acclaimed performance in the hit comedy Some Like It Hot. Her last role, in The Misfits (1961), was directed by John Huston and written by Miller, whom she divorced just one week before the film’s opening.

By 1961, Monroe, beset by depression, was under the constant care of a psychiatrist. Increasingly erratic in the last months of her life, she lived as a virtual recluse in her Brentwood, Los Angeles, home. After midnight on August 5, 1962, her maid, Eunice Murray, noticed Monroe’s bedroom light on. When Murray found the door locked and Marilyn unresponsive to her calls, she called Monroe’s psychiatrist, Dr. Ralph Greenson, who gained access to the room by breaking a window. Entering, he found Marilyn dead, and the police were called sometime after. An autopsy found a fatal amount of sedatives in her system, and her death was ruled probable suicide.

In recent decades, there have been a number of conspiracy theories about her death, most of which contend that she was murdered by John and/or Robert Kennedy, with whom she allegedly had love affairs. These theories claim that the Kennedys killed her (or had her killed) because they feared she would make public their love affairs and other government secrets she was gathering. On August 4, 1962, Robert Kennedy, then attorney general in his older brother’s cabinet, was in fact in Los Angeles. Two decades after the fact, Monroe’s housekeeper, Eunice Murray, announced for the first time that the attorney general had visited Marilyn on the night of her death and quarreled with her, but the reliability of these and other statements made by Murray are questionable.

Four decades after her death, Marilyn Monroe remains a major cultural icon. The unknown details of her final performance only add to her mystique.
... History.com

A client of one of my agents is a noted memorabilia collector and has the note to Joe DiMaggio that was found at the scene.  The note just doesn't add up with the rest of the scene.

For the model, we'll use JOssorio's Marilyn, http://librosgratispapercraftymas.blogspot.com.es/2013/02/marylin-monroe-cine.html

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Vermin King

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Re: August (2016)
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2016, 09:05:24 AM »
August 6, 1945  Enola Gay Drops Little Boy on Hiroshima



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At 0245 hours, a four-engine, long range heavy bomber of the 509th Composite Group, United States Army Air Force, took off from North Field, Tinian Island in the Marshall Group, on the most secret combat mission of World War II.

The Martin-Omaha B-29-45-MO Superfortress, 44-86292, under the command of Colonel Paul W. Tibbets, Jr., was carrying Bomb Unit L-11, the first nuclear weapon to be used during war. This was a 9,700-pound (4,400 kilogram) “gun type” fission bomb, the Mark I, code-named Little Boy. It contained 64 kilograms (141.1 pounds) of highly-enriched uranium. The bomb was 120 inches (3.048 meters) long with a diameter of  28 inches (0.711 meter). Although it was a very inefficient weapon, it was considered to be such reliable design that it had not been tested.

The bomber’s crew consisted of 12 men. The B-29 was fueled with 7,000 gallons (26,500 liters) of gasoline, and carried 1,000 rounds of ammunition for each of the two .50-caliber machine guns in the tail.

On the morning before the mission, Colonel Tibbets had his mother’s name painted on the nose of the airplane: Enola Gay. He had personally selected this bomber while it was still on the assembly line at the Glenn L. Martin plant, Bellevue, Nebraska, 9 May 1945. It was accepted by the Army on 15 May and flown to the 509th’s base at Wendover, Utah by Captain Robert A. Lewis, a B-29 aircraft commander who was acting as Tibbets’ co-pilot on the atomic bombing mission.

44-86292 was a specially modified “Silverplate” B-29. It differed from the standard production version in many ways. It had new fuel-injected 3,347-cubic-inch-displacement (54.86 liter) air-cooled Wright Aeronautical Corporation R-3350-41 Duplex-Cyclone two-row 18-cylinder turbo-compound radial engines with Curtiss Electric reversible propellers. This engine was rated at 2,200 horsepower for take-off, and 2,300 horsepower at 25,000 feet (7,620 meters), War Emergency Power. With the exception of the tail gunner’s position, all defensive armament—four powered remote gun turrets with their 20mm cannon and .50-caliber machine guns—were deleted. Their remote sighting positions were also removed. The bomber had no armor. The bomb release mechanism in the forward bomb bay was replaced by a single-point release as used in special British Lancaster bombers. Additional fuel tanks were installed in the rear bomb bay. The bomb bay doors were operated by quick-acting pneumatic systems. A weaponeer’s control station was added to the cockpit to monitor the special bomb systems. With these changes, the Silverplate B-29s could fly higher and faster than a standard B-29, and the new engines were more reliable.

At 09:15:17 hours, mission time (8:15 a.m., local), Enola Gay was at 31,000 feet (9,500 meters) over the Japanese city of Hiroshima, an industrial center with a population of about 340,000 people, on the island of Honshu. The bombardier initiated the automatic release sequence and the the atomic bomb was dropped. It fell for 44.4 seconds and detonated at an altitude of 1,968 feet (600 meters), about 800 feet (244 meters) from the aiming point, the Aioi Bridge over the Ota River. The resulting explosion was approximately equivalent in explosive force to the detonation of 16,000 tons (14,515 metric tons) of TNT (16 “kilotons”). An estimated 70,000 people were killed immediately, and another 70,000 were wounded. As many as 160,000 people may have died as a result of the atomic bombing by the end of 1945. An area of the city with a radius of 1 mile (1.6 kilometers) from the point of detonation (“hypocenter”) was totally destroyed, and combined with the fires that followed, 4.7 square miles (12.17 kilometers²) of the city were destroyed. 69% of all building in Hiroshima were completely destroyed and another 6% damaged.

As soon as the bomb was released, Colonel Tibbets turned his B-29 away to avoid the blast. It was just over 11 miles (17.7 kilometers) from the detonation point when the shock waves hit, but no damage resulted. The bomber was then flown back to Tinian, landing after 12 hours, 13 minutes.

Enola Gay was placed in storage at Davis-Monthan Army Air Field, Tucson, Arizona, 26 July 1946, and was transferred to the Smithsonian Institution just over one month later, 30 August 1946. For decades it sat in storage at different locations around the country, but finally a total restoration was performed. Today, the B-29 is on display at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, National Air and Space Museum.
... This Day in Aviation

Since the Enola Gay would not have been important without Little Boy, I'm going to use Little Boy as today's model, https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-24-little-boy-atomic-bomb-paper-model.html
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Vermin King

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Re: August (2016)
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2016, 09:24:49 PM »
August 7, 1919 First Flight Across Canadian Rockies



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Captain Ernest Charles Hoy, DFC, RAF, a World War I fighter pilot credited with 13 aerial victories, became the first pilot to fly across the Canadian Rockies when he flew from Richmond, British Columbia, to Calgary, Alberta, carrying the mail for the Post Office Department. His airplane was a single-engine Canadian Aeroplanes Ltd.-built JN-4 Canuck biplane, an independent derivative of the Curtiss JN-4 “Jenny”. The Canuck was powered by a 90 horsepower water-cooled Curtiss V-8 engine. Captain Hoy had an additional 12 gallon fuel tank installed in the forward cockpit.
... This Day in Aviation

You can find a JN-2 Jenny at http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/aircraft/Curtiss-MailJenny.html
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Vermin King

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Re: August (2016)
« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2016, 02:56:15 PM »
August 9, 1995 Jerry Garcia Dies



Well, I've been a Grateful Dead fan for as long as I can remember.  So this one means more to me than most, probably.

I do enjoy listening to the Dead while I am doing paper models, and of the fifty or so neckties that I have, a good twenty of them are Jerry Garcia ties.  Early 80's was the first time I had tickets to see them, and Jerry went into a diabetic coma.  Dangit.  Got tickets again in the mid-80's and he went into a coma again.  Double Damn.  Then I had tickets again and he died.  Son of a Buck.

Helpful hint here:  If you are in a band, don't let me buy tickets.

Not a whole lot of Dead models out there and most aren't all that great, so we'll do the paper doll.
http://thepapercollector.blogspot.com.br/2013/04/jerry-garcia-paper-doll-by-trina.html


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Vermin King

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Re: August (2016)
« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2016, 01:15:13 PM »
August 10, 1960  Antonio Banderas Born



Okay, this is one of those deals when I let my stubborn streak get the best of me.  Saw his birthday, remembered the HP papertoys that are no longer available and remembered that they were also available from the movie site, but the site didn't give the option to get to them any more.  Hmmm.  Played around and found out you can still get to them.

You can get your Puss in Boots 3d papertoys at http://create.dreamworks.com/crafts?ecmp=tv_puss_internal_foldables

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Dave Winfield

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Re: August (2016)
« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2016, 11:40:11 PM »
great.....cats
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Vermin King

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Re: August (2016)
« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2016, 08:34:40 AM »
You know, there's a James Bond out there.  And Chuck Norris. Indiana Jones and all kinds of Star Wars figures.  Shouldn't Zorro have been done already?
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