Author Topic: September (2016)  (Read 2362 times)

Vermin King

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Re: September (2016)
« Reply #11 on: September 10, 2016, 08:48:06 AM »
September 11, 1920 First Transcontinental Mail Run

I almost did 2001 again, but I'm not



Quote
At 2:33 p.m., Edison E. (“Monte”) Mouton landed at Marina Field near The Presidio of San Francisco, completing the final leg of the first transcontinental air mail flight by the U.S. Postal Service. Airplane No. 151 carried 6 sacks of First Class mail from New York. Mouton, a pilot assigned to Salt Lake City, taking over the flight for another pilot, flew No. 151 from Reno, Nevada to San Francisco, a distance of 250 miles (402 kilometers), in 1 hour, 58 minutes. The mail sacks were immediately taken from the airplane to the central post office, where they were distributed. Two of the mail sacks were sent to Washington State and one sack to Oregon on the 4 o’clock train.

The entire cross-country flight had taken 75 hours.

Monte Mouton had been a pilot with the Lafayette Escadrille in France during World War I. He was employed by the United States Aerial Mail Service from 8 September 1920 to 22 May 1927. During that time, Edison flew 3,804.54 hours and covered 369,730 miles (595,023 kilometers), flying the mail.
... This Day in Aviation

So for the model, let's use the US Mail Jenny from FG, http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/aircraft/Curtiss-MailJenny.html
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Vermin King

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Re: September (2016)
« Reply #12 on: September 12, 2016, 03:31:52 PM »
September 12, 1973 Paul Walker Born



Yes, I know, the movie Timeline was no where near as good as the book, and this isn't the movie that he is known for, but there have been some builds at PM.com of Zio planes and figures lately, so I thought I'd mention that his medieval soldiers are still accessible from Wayback Machine ... for the most part.

https://web.archive.org/web/20150111082744/http://www.zioprudenzio.it/fok-soldaz.html

To paraphrase the professor, If you don't know history, you don't know squat.

It really was a good book
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Re: September (2016)
« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2016, 01:36:52 PM »
September 13, 1935 Hughes H-1 Speed Record



Quote
13 September 1935: Flying his Hughes H-1 Special, NR258Y,  Howard Robard Hughes, Jr. set a Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) World Record for Speed Over a 3 Kilometer Course near Santa Ana, California. Making four passes over the measured course, two in each direction, his average speed was 567.12 kilometers per hour (352.39 miles per hour). This was 61.27 kilometers per hour (38.07 miles per hour) faster than the previous record which had been set by Raymond Delmotte, 24 December 1934.

FAI Record File Num #8748 [Direct Link]
 Status: ratified – superseded since approved
 Region: World
 Class: C (Powered Aeroplanes)
 Sub-Class: C (Aviation with engine)
 Category: General
 Group: Not applicable
 Type of record: Speed over a 3 km course
 Performance: 567.12 km/h
 Date: 1935-09-13
 Course/Location: Santa Ana, CA (USA)
 Claimant Howard Hughes (USA)
 Aeroplane: Hughes Special
 Engine(s): Pratt & Whitney Wasp Junior

The Hughes H-1 (FAA records describe the airplane as a Hughes Model 1B, serial number 1) was a single-seat, single-engine low wing monoplane with retractable landing gear. Emphasis had been placed on an aerodynamically clean design and featured flush riveting on the aluminum skin of the fuselage. The airplane was 27 feet, 0 inches long (8.230 meters) with a wingspan of 25 feet (7.6 meters) and height of 8 feet (2.438 meters). (A second set of wings with a span of 31 feet, 9 inches (9.677 meters) was used on Hughes’ transcontinental flight, 19 January 1937). The H-1 has an empty weight of 3,565 pounds (1,617 kilograms) and gross weight of 5,492 pounds (2,491 kilograms).

The H-1 was powered by a air-cooled, supercharged 1,534.94-cubic-inch-displacement (25.153 liter) Pratt & Whitney Twin Wasp Jr. (R-1535) two-row, fourteen-cylinder radial engine. Pratt & Whitney produced 18 civil and 22 military versions of the Twin Wasp Jr., in both direct drive and geared configurations, rated from 650 to 950 horsepower. It is not known which version powered the H-1, but various sources report that it was rated from 700 to 1,000 horsepower. The engine drove a two-bladed Hamilton Standard controllable pitch propeller.
... This Day in Aviation



Going with the FG model on this one, http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/aircraft/Hughes-H1.html
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Re: September (2016)
« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2016, 02:11:38 PM »
September 14, 1947 Sam Neill Born



Eh, nothing grabbed me at History.com or Brainyhistory or ThisDayinAviation or ThisDayinScienceFiction.  So I am taking another quick one.

The JP Explorer ... again ... from Patrick Pasques.  http://www.maquettes-papier.net/forumenpapier/topic6886.html



I've done this twice for Jurassic Park fans, both times printing at two pages per page for a 73% reduction.  Builds up nice.

I've had another request for it...
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Re: September (2016)
« Reply #15 on: September 15, 2016, 01:28:22 PM »
September 15, 1916, Tanks Introduced at Battle of the Somme



Quote
“And there, between them, spewing death, unearthly monsters.” To a Bavarian infantry officer on the Somme in the early morning hours of 15 September 1916, the rhomboid, tracked behemoths lurching at him amidst waves of attacking enemy infantry had no name. The British called them “tanks,” but he could not know this; neither he nor any of his commanders had ever seen or heard of them. That morning other reports from nearby announced sightings of an “extraordinary vehicle” mistaken for an ambulance until machine gun fire burst from its side; of machines spewing smoke which the men mistook for poison gas; of prehistoric or futuristic creatures, uncertain in gait and obscure in purpose. Ten days later the puzzlement on the Somme, if anything, had spread. From the remains of an infantry regiment near the village of Thiepval came a description of an egg-shaped machine, “5 or 6 meters long,” mounted with machine guns on its side and shovels on its front to push the earth aside. How the thing propelled itself was unclear. And had it just disgorged the 40 men around it, or had they followed on foot? It was hard to say

For almost two years the British had been working fitfully on it. The idea was hardly novel. “I shall produce unassailable, covered chariots,” Leonardo da Vinci had written in 1482 to Ludovico Sforza, the Duke of Milan, “which will enter the enemy lines with their artillery and will break through any troop formations, however numerous they may be. The infantry will be able to follow, without losses or obstacle.” By the eve of the First World War inventors of various stripes and nationalities had come up with armored cars, guns on caterpillar tractors, and, at least on paper, notional machines, mobile steel boxes perhaps, that would overcome hostile fire or carry a human element safely through it. The corpses in South Africa and Manchuria, left by the recent Boer and Russo-Japanese wars, convinced anyone who still needed convincing that exposed infantry could neither withstand nor break through modern firepower. In the summer and autumn of 1914 the reciprocal carnage wrought by the machine gun in the Great War and the impregnable trenches, earthworks, and gun emplacements that soon defined the lines of the Western Front lent new urgency to the designers’ reveries. From early 1915 proposals in the British army for a “machine-gun destroyer” or “landcruiser” or “landship” — an armor-clad Dreadnought to ply the fields of Flanders — wound their way slowly through the bureaucracy, while a prototype emerged almost as painfully from elaborate simulations at Shoeburyness in Essex and on Lord Salisbury’s estate at Hatfield Park. They were designing a water carrier, the authorities let it be known for secrecy’s sake, and they tried naming their brainchild a “reservoir,” a “receptacle,” a “cistern,” until they settled on the most mundane cognomen of all: “tank”.

The new machines acquired their most important advocate early, in the controversial figure of Douglas Haig, Commander of the British Expeditionary Force. He had first learned of them from an early promoter, Winston Churchill, and by 1916 he yearned to put them to use in the summer allied offensive on the Somme. But they were not ready on 1 July, when the British left their trenches and took 60,000 casualties, the worst day in their military history. By the time they were, British and Dominion forces had suffered many more casualties and made only modest gains, and huddled under the first of the autumnal rains that would make the Somme terrain even more impassable than it already was. Haig was determined to break through, and deploy his new weapon — the Mark I tank, weighing about 28 tons, moving at no more than four miles an hour, and carrying guns or machine guns — while he still could. He did not break through, and his new weapon scarcely made any difference to the outcome. Forty nine tanks were on hand that day, supposed to reach the German front lines on a six-mile front about five minutes ahead of the first infantry wave. Most broke down or ditched, many before they even reached the departure line. Of the 18 that participated effectively, some arrived alongside their infantry or even behind them. Others lost their way and fired on their own men. In time shellfire or even bullets striking fuel lines incinerated those still in action. When they did break through, they devastated enemy defenses, and in the village of Flers one of them drove up the main road, firing sideways, as cheering troops followed behind. Then they provoked some local panics, by the Germans’ own admission. But mostly they bogged down, like the attacks themselves, and set off nothing like the general panic that had swept through some French Territorial and Algerian divisions entrenched at Ypres the year before, when the Germans had sent cylinders with nearly 200 tons of chlorine their way and introduced chemical warfare to the Western front.
... Paul Jankowski, Oxford University Press

You can find Wayne McCullough's MkI at http://www.landships.info/landships/models.html#

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Re: September (2016)
« Reply #16 on: September 16, 2016, 12:34:48 PM »
September 16, 1847 United Shakespeare Company Buys his Birthplace in Stratford-upon-Avon



I really figured there would be several paper models of this, and after going down rabbit trails on the other two ideas, I was bound and determined to find one.

Unfortunately, it was on ebay and it was already sold.  http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/SHAKESPEARES-BIRTHPLACE-CARD-CUT-OUT-MODEL-BY-THE-PRODUCERS-OF-MICROMODELS-/151768406387

Looks like it would have been a good one.



FG also has one, http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/buildings/shakespr.html

And I really liked this one, http://www.didwallpaper.com/gal/ad_0304.html

Neither of the last two have the wing that goes off the back
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Re: September (2016)
« Reply #17 on: September 17, 2016, 03:51:23 PM »
September 17, 1976  Space Shuttle Unveiled



Quote
On September 17, 1976, NASA publicly unveils its first space shuttle, the Enterprise, during a ceremony in Palmdale, California. Development of the aircraft-like spacecraft cost almost $10 billion and took nearly a decade. In 1977, the Enterprise became the first space shuttle to fly freely when it was lifted to a height of 25,000 feet by a Boeing 747 airplane and then released, gliding back to Edwards Air Force Base on its own accord.

Regular flights of the space shuttle began on April 12, 1981, with the launching of Columbia from Cape Canaveral, Florida. Launched by two solid-rocket boosters and an external tank, only the aircraft-like shuttle entered into orbit around Earth. When the two-day mission was completed, the shuttle fired engines to reduce speed and, after descending through the atmosphere, landed like a glider at California's Edwards Air Force Base.

Early shuttles took satellite equipment into space and carried out various scientific experiments. On January 28, 1986, NASA and the space shuttle program suffered a major setback when the Challenger exploded 74 seconds after takeoff and all seven people aboard were killed.

In September 1988, space shuttle flights resumed with the successful launching of the Discovery. Since then, the space shuttle has carried out numerous important missions, such as the repair and maintenance of the Hubble Space Telescope and the construction and manning of the International Space Station.

A tragedy in space again rocked the nation on February 1, 2003, when Columbia, on its 28th mission, disintegrated during re-entry of the earth's atmosphere. All seven astronauts aboard were killed. In the aftermath, the space-shuttle program was grounded until Discovery returned to space in July 2005, amid concerns that the problems that had downed Columbia had not yet been fully solved.
... History.com

Going with the AXM model this year, http://www.axmpaperspacescalemodels.com/Enterprise.html#.VBmwfk10yM8



I'm not sure why they show it ready to launch, since it was never designed to go into space, having no heat shields or engines.
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Re: September (2016)
« Reply #18 on: September 18, 2016, 01:29:07 PM »
September 18, 1948 First Delta-Winged Aircraft Flies



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The first delta-winged aircraft took flight for the first time when Convair test pilot Ellis D. “Sam” Shannon lifted off from Muroc Dry Lake with the prototype Convair XF-92A, serial number 46-682. For 18 minutes he familiarized himself with the new aircraft type. It was powered by an Allison J33-A-21 turbojet engine producing 4,250 pounds of thrust.

Later, with Captain Chuck Yeager flying, the XF-92A reached Mach 1.05.  Yeager found that the airplane’s delta wing made it nearly impossible to stall, even with a 45° angle of attack. He was able to land the airplane at nearly 100 miles per hour slower than the designers had predicted.

The XF-92A was a difficult airplane to fly. NACA test pilot Scott Crossfield commented that there was not a line of pilots waiting to fly it.

The XF-92A was not put into production. It did appear in several motion pictures, including “Toward The Unknown” (one of my favorites). It is in the collection of the National Museum of the United States Air Force. This was the first of several Convair delta-winged aircraft, including the F2Y Sea Dart, F-102A Delta Dart and F-106A Delta Dagger supersonic interceptors, and the B-58A Hustler four-engine Mach 2+ strategic bomber.
  ... This Day in Aviation

You can get yours at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-48-convair-xf-92a-dart-paper-model.html
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Re: September (2016)
« Reply #19 on: September 19, 2016, 02:21:17 PM »
September 19, 2016 VK Shoots Craps

Okay, I thought this would be rather easy, as I have several survival knives in my files, but I can't seem to find the sites for any of them.  What brings this up is that:

[/September 19, 1827 Jim Bowie Disembowels Louisiana Bankerb]

Quote
After a duel turns into an all-out brawl on this day in 1827, Jim Bowie disembowels a banker in Alexandria, Louisiana, with an early version of his famous Bowie knife. The actual inventor of the Bowie knife, however, was probably not Jim Bowie, but rather his equally belligerent brother, Rezin Bowie, who reportedly came up with the design after nearly being killed in a vicious knife fight.

The Bowie brothers engaged in more fights than the typical frontiersman of the day, but such violent duels were not uncommon events on the untamed margins of American civilization. In the early nineteenth century, most frontiersmen preferred knives to guns for fighting, and the Bowie knife quickly became one of the favorites. Rezin Bowie had invented such a nasty looking weapon that the mere sight of it probably discouraged many would-be robbers and attackers. Designs varied somewhat, but the typical Bowie knife sported a 9- to 15- inch blade sharpened only on one side for much of its length, though the curved tip was sharpened to a point on both sides. The double-edged tip made the knife an effective stabbing weapon, while the dull-edge combined with a brass hand guard allowed the user to slide a hand down over the blade as needed. The perfect knife for close-quarter fighting, the Bowie knife became the weapon of choice for many westerners before the reliable rapid-fire revolver took its place in the post-Civil War period.
... History.com

I've got a non-textured knife that could pass as a Bowie knife, and a much nicer textured one that is more of a military knife.

If you find one, please post
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Vermin King

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Re: September (2016)
« Reply #20 on: September 20, 2016, 01:28:27 PM »
September 20, 1945 Packard's Last Rolls Royce Merlin Engine

Quote
Automotive manufacturers had been at the heart of a seamless war machine during World War II, producing trucks, tanks, and planes at astounding rates. But only after the last shots were fired did auto factories begin to produce cars again, focusing their sights on the booming postwar market. A month after the surrender of Japan, Packard followed the lead of every other company and ceased military production, turning out its last wartime Rolls-Royce Merlin engine on this day.
... ThisDayinUSMilHistory

These are days that I really enjoy doing some sleuthing.  Mowing is done, dishes done, time to sleuth.  I remember last year, doing the Voyager after going down many false trails, which wasn't bad.  I wanted to do something different this year, and found this entry.  This took me to David Sakrison's build of Alin Osarik's model, http://sakrisonwings.blogspot.com/2008/09/i-built-alin-osariks-merlin-engine-in.html.  Alas, links to the model there did not work and various searches of the internet turned up dead forum entries.  So since David is active at PM.com, I searched there, and Voila!, there it is in the download section.

You can find the model at http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/vbdownloads.php?do=download&downloadid=1276

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Vermin King

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Re: September (2016)
« Reply #21 on: September 21, 2016, 09:56:01 PM »
September 21, 1866 H.G. Wells Born



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H.G. Wells, pioneer of science fiction, is born on this day in Bromley, England.

Wells was born near London and received a scholarship to the Normal School of Science in London. After school, he worked as a draper’s apprentice and bookkeeper before becoming a freelance writer. His lively treatment of scientific topics quickly brought him success as a writer.

In 1895, he published his classic novel The Time Machine, about a man who journeys to the future. The book was a success, as were his subsequent books The Invisible Man (1897) and The War of the Worlds (1898).

Passionately concerned about the fate of humanity, Wells joined the socialist Fabian Society but quit after a quarrel with George Bernard Shaw, another prominent member. He was involved romantically for several years with Dorothy Richardson, pioneer of stream-of-consciousness writing. In 1912, the 19-year-old writer Rebecca West reviewed his book Marriage, calling him “The Old Maid among novelists.” He asked to meet her, and the two soon embarked on an affair that lasted 10 years and produced one son, Anthony. Wells died in 1946.
... History.com

I selected that picture because Wells is considered to be the Father of Recreational Wargaming.  You can read more about it at https://crossfireamersfoort.wordpress.com/2012/06/21/illustrious-wargamers-herbert-george-wells/.  So he probably would be right at home with our little hobby.

For the model, I'm going with Olli's Time Machine, http://cutandfold.info/cutandfoldforum/index.php?topic=292.0
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