Author Topic: October (2016)  (Read 1783 times)

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2422
  • Kudos 26
October (2016)
« on: October 01, 2016, 04:10:02 PM »
October 1, 2013 Tom Clancy Dies



Quote
On this day in 2013, espionage and military thriller author Tom Clancy, whose books include “The Hunt for Red October” and “Patriot Games,” dies in Baltimore at age 66 following a brief illness. During a career that spanned nearly 30 years, Clancy penned more than two dozen novels, a number of which were made into hit movies and popular video games. By the time of his death, more than 100 million copies of Clancy’s books were in print and 17 of his novels had reached the top of The New York Times’ best-seller list.

Clancy was born on April 12, 1947, in Baltimore, where he grew up in a middle-class neighborhood. At Loyola College (now known as Loyola University Maryland), Clancy majored in English and participated in ROTC; however, he was unable to join the military due to severe nearsightedness. Instead, after graduating in 1969, he became an insurance agent. In his spare time, Clancy read military journals and eventually started writing what would become his debut novel, “The Hunt for Red October,” about a renegade Soviet nuclear submarine pursued by both the Americans and the Soviets (the story was based loosely on the real-life attempted mutiny of a Soviet missile frigate in 1975). Purchased by a publisher for $5,000 and released in 1984, “The Hunt for Red October” became a runaway best-seller, thanks in part to an endorsement from President Ronald Reagan, who labeled the book “my kind of yarn.” The novel was full of authentic details about military technology, something that would become one of Clancy’s trademarks and which would initially lead some U.S. military officials to suspect the author had gained access to classified information. In fact, he had no insider knowledge but instead did in-depth research.

Clancy followed “The Hunt for Red October” with such novels as “Patriot Games” (1987), about a terrorist plot against the British royal family, “Clear and Present Danger” (1989), about a covert U.S. military campaign against a Colombian drug cartel, and “The Sum of All Fears” (1991), about terrorists who use a nuclear weapon to try to start a war between America and Russia. Other Clancy titles include “Executive Orders” (1996), “Rainbow Six” (1998), “Against All Enemies” (2011), “Threat Vector” (2012) and “Command Authority” (2013). Some of his work seemed to predict real-life events. For example, well before the September 11 terrorist attacks, Clancy wrote “Debt of Honor” (1994), in which a character flies a Boeing 747 into the U.S. Capitol.

Clancy’s most famous character, Jack Ryan, a CIA analyst who in later stories becomes U.S. president, was portrayed on the big screen by Alec Baldwin in 1990’s “The Hunt for Red October”; Harrison Ford in 1992’s “Patriot Games” and 1994’s “Clear and Present Danger”; Ben Affleck in 2002’s “The Sum of All Fears” and Chris Pine in 2014’s “Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit.” In addition to his movies, novels and a number of nonfiction books about the military, Clancy co-founded a video game company and became a part owner of the Baltimore Orioles. He famously had an Army tank on the lawn of his Maryland estate.
  ... History.com

For the model, let's go with Bryan Tan's Red October, http://rocketmantan.deviantart.com/art/Red-October-Submarine-Paper-Model-404061955
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2422
  • Kudos 26
Re: October (2016)
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2016, 06:16:02 PM »
October 2, 1952 XB-52 First Flight



Quote
The Boeing XB-52 Stratofortress prototype, 49-230, made its first flight at Boeing Field, Seattle, Washington, with test pilot Alvin M. “Tex” Johnston in command.

The first of two prototype strategic bombers, the XB-52 had been damaged during ground testing and extensive repairs were required, delaying its initial flight. The pre-production aircraft, YB-52 49-231, made the type’s first flight, 15 April 1952.

The prototype Stratofortress the largest jet aircraft built up to that time. It was 152 feet, 8 inches (46.431 meters) long with a wingspan of 185 feet (56.388 meters) and 48 feet, 4 inches (17.731 meters) to the top of the vertical fin. Its gross weight was 390,000 pounds (176,900 kilograms). The XB-52 was powered by eight Pratt and Whitney YJ-57-P-3 turbojet engines, producing 8,700 pounds of thrust, each, giving it a maximum speed of 615 miles per hour (890 kilometers per hour), a cruising speed of 525 miles per hour (845 kilometers per hour) and a service ceiling of 50,000 feet (15,240 meters). Its range was 7,000 miles (11,269 kilometers).

In its original configuration, the XB-52 was armed with two .50-caliber machine guns in a turret in the tail, though these guns were not installed on 49-230. It was designed to carry a 25,000 pound bomb load.

XB-52 49-230 was used in testing for its entire service life. It was scrapped in the mid-1960s. 744 B-52 bombers were built by Boeing at Seattle and Wichita, Kansas, with the last one, B-52H-175-BW, 61-0040, rolled out 22 June 1962. 76 B-52H Stratofortresses are still in service with the United States Air Force.
... This Day in Aviation



For the model, we'll go with Gary Pilsworth's XB-52 at http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/vbdownloads.php?do=download&downloadid=711
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2422
  • Kudos 26
Re: October (2016)
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2016, 01:25:16 PM »
October 3, 1990 Germany Re-United



Quote
Less than one year after the destruction of the Berlin Wall, East and West Germany come together on what is known as "Unity Day." Since 1945, when Soviet forces occupied eastern Germany, and the United States and other Allied forces occupied the western half of the nation at the close of World War II, divided Germany had come to serve as one of the most enduring symbols of the Cold War. Some of the most dramatic episodes of the Cold War took place there. The Berlin Blockade (June 1948--May 1949), during which the Soviet Union blocked all ground travel into West Berlin, and the construction of the Berlin Wall in 1961 were perhaps the most famous. With the gradual waning of Soviet power in the late 1980s, the Communist Party in East Germany began to lose its grip on power. Tens of thousands of East Germans began to flee the nation, and by late 1989 the Berlin Wall started to come down. Shortly thereafter, talks between East and West German officials, joined by officials from the United States, Great Britain, France, and the USSR, began to explore the possibility of reunification. Two months following reunification, all-German elections took place and Helmut Kohl became the first chancellor of the reunified Germany. Although this action came more than a year before the dissolution of the Soviet Union, for many observers the reunification of Germany effectively marked the end of the Cold War.
... History.com

I was looking for the Brandenburg Gate, but the Reichstag, site of the Bundestag, seems more appropriate.  You can find the Reichstag at http://bastelbogen-online.de/archiv/Gebaeude/Berlin/
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2422
  • Kudos 26
Re: October (2016)
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2016, 01:48:17 PM »
October 4, 1923 Charlton Heston Born



Boy, are these guys in for a surprise...

You can get the Icarus at http://aliens.humlak.cz/aliens/aliens_papirove_modely/bonus-icarus_gb.html
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2422
  • Kudos 26
Re: October (2016)
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2016, 09:26:12 AM »
October 5, 1914 First Air-to-Air Kill in History



Quote
The first aerial combat between two airplanes took place during World War I over Jonchery, Reims, France.

A French Voisin III biplane of Escadrille VB24, flown by Sergeant Joseph Frantz with observer Corporal Louis Quénault, engaged a German Aviatik B.II flown by Oberleutnant Fritz von Zangen and Sergeant Wilhelm Schlichting of FFA 18.

The Voisin was armed with a Hotchkiss M1909 8mm machine gun. Corporal Quénault fired two 48-round magazines at the German airplane, whose crew returned fire with rifles. Quénault’s machine gun jammed and he continued to fire on the Aviatik with a rifle.

The German airplane crashed and von Zangen and Schlichting were killed.

This was the first air-to-air kill in the history of warfare.
...ThisDayinAviation

You can get your own Voisin III at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-32-voisin-las-french.html
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2422
  • Kudos 26
Re: October (2016)
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2016, 10:58:06 AM »
October 6, 1918 Goettler and Bleckley Shot Down in Argonne Forest



Quote
During the Meuse-Argonne offensive of World War I, approximately 554 soldiers of the 77th “Metropolitan” Division advanced into the Argonne Forest with a French division on their left flank and the American 92nd Division to the left. They moved quickly, unaware that the flanking units were held up. Soon, they were far ahead of the Allied advance and became cut off behind the German lines. With higher ground to all sides, the elements of the 307th and 308th Infantry Regiments and 306th Machine Gun Battalion came under heavy attack by enemy infantry and artillery.

With their communications cut off, they were soon low on food and ammunition. The only water available was a nearby stream that was protected by German gunfire.

Major General Robert Alexander, commanding the 77th Division, requested that the 50th Aero Squadron, based at Remicourt, attempt to locate the cut-off unit and resupply them by air. Among the officers of the 50th participating in the search were First Lieutenant Harold Ernest Goettler and Second Lieutenant Erwin Russell Bleckley, flying their Boeing-built DH-4M-1, A.S. 32517, squadron number 6.

Medal of Honor

Harold Ernest Goettler

Rank and organization: First Lieutenant, pilot, U.S. Air Service, 50th Aero Squadron, Air Service.

Place and date: Near Binarville, France, October 6, 1918.

Entered service at: Chicago, Ill. Born: July 21, 1890, Chicago, Ill.

G.O. No.: 56, W.D., 1922.

Citation:1st. Lt. Goettler, with his observer, 2d Lt. Erwin R. Bleckley, 130th Field Artillery, left the airdrome late in the afternoon on their second trip to drop supplies to a battalion of the 77th Division which had been cut off by the enemy in the Argonne Forest. Having been subjected on the first trip to violent fire from the enemy, they attempted on the second trip to come still lower in order to get the packages even more precisely on the designated spot. In the course of this mission the plane was brought down by enemy rifle and machinegun fire from the ground, resulting in the instant death of 1st. Lt. Goettler. In attempting and performing this mission 1st. Lt. Goettler showed the highest possible contempt of personal danger, devotion to duty, courage and valor.

Medal of Honor

Erwin Russell Bleckley

Place and date: Near Binarville, France, October 6, 1918.

Rank and organization: Second Lieutenant, 130th Field Artillery, observer 50th Aero Squadron, Air Service.

Entered service at: Wichita, Kans. Birth: Wichita, Kans.

G.O. No.: 56, W.D., 1922.

Citation:

2d Lt. Bleckley, with his pilot, 1st Lt. Harold E. Goettler, Air Service, left the airdrome late in the afternoon on their second trip to drop supplies to a battalion of the 77th Division, which had been cut off by the enemy in the Argonne Forest. Having been subjected on the first trip to violent fire from the enemy, they attempted on the second trip to come still lower in order to get the packages even more precisely on the designated spot. In the course of his mission the plane was brought down by enemy rifle and machinegun fire from the ground, resulting in fatal wounds to 2d Lt. Bleckley, who died before he could be taken to a hospital. In attempting and performing this mission 2d Lt. Bleckley showed the highest possible contempt of personal danger, devotion to duty, courage, and valor.
...ThisDayinAviation

You can find the DH-4 at http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/aircraft/Airco-DH4.html
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2422
  • Kudos 26
Re: October (2016)
« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2016, 10:31:27 AM »
October 7, 1944 B-17's Continue Assault on Germany



Quote
The bomber war continued. No longer distracted by the need to support the campaign in France RAF Bomber Command and the US Eighth Air Force commanders turned their attention almost exclusively to Germany. Many still believed that bombing alone would knock Germany out of the war and the progressive destruction of most of Germany’s cities was resumed. The primary targets were the diminishing number of German synthetic oil installations, an attempt to cut off the fuel that kept the Wehrmacht running.

The German air defences had long ago recognised the importance of guarding oil installation – and the best organised and equipped anti aircraft guns were inevitably found around these targets. For crews that had not yet visited these targets the difference in intensity of “flak” was tangible.
... World War II Today

One description told of 'Flak so thick you could taxi on it.'  Another description told of kissing the ground when they returned and finding over 250 flak holes in the poor carcass of their B-17.

You can find your B-17 at http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/aircraft/Boeing-B17.html
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2422
  • Kudos 26
Re: October (2016)
« Reply #7 on: October 08, 2016, 03:26:12 PM »
October 8, 1919 First Transcontinental Air Race



Quote
The first transcontinental air race in the United States begins, with 63 planes competing in the round-trip aerial derby between California and New York. As 15 planes departed the Presidio in San Francisco, California, 48 planes left Roosevelt Field on Long Island, New York.

Lieutenant Belvin Maynard, flying a Havilland-4 with a Liberty motor, won the 5,400-mile race across the continent and back. Maynard reached the Presidio in just over three days, rested and serviced his plane for another three days, and then returned to Roosevelt Field in just under four days. Maynard won for the lowest total elapsed time, but in actual flight time--24 hours, 59 minutes, and 49 seconds--three others accomplished the round-trip journey faster.
... History.com

Okay, from the National Park Service, Presidio site, this was more of an Endurance and Reliability Test, rather than a race or derby, but folks being what they are, it was a race.  I feel kind of bad, hitting the de Havilland 4 again for the model, but this story has proved very interesting.  What are pilots from WWI going to do when they get home?  Keep flying!  Aircraft proved their usefulness during the war, and the U.S. Army was testing to see what they needed going forward.

So apologies aside for turning this into DH-4 week, the model can be found at http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/aircraft/Airco-DH4.html
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2422
  • Kudos 26
Re: October (2016)
« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2016, 01:00:39 PM »
October 9, 1890 Ader's Eole Flies



Quote
At the Chateau d’Amainvilliers, near Bretz, Clément Ader’s flying machine, Éole, flew for the first time.

An inventor, Ader had recently spent months in Algeria, observing the vultures. When he returned to France he began to design and build a bat-like machine with a wing spread of 46 feet (14 meters), weighing 1,100 pounds (500 kilograms), powered by a light-weight 4-cylinder steam engine. The engine produced 20 horsepower and drove a 4-bladed tractor propeller. The machine was named for the Greek god who controlled the winds, Aeolus.

The aircraft took off under its own power, climbed to an altitude of approximately 20 centimeters (8 inches) and flew 164 feet (50 meters). The flight was witnessed by two gentlemen named Espinosa and Vallier.

On a subsequent flight, Éole flew a similar distance, but came in contact with some carts that were under its path. It overturned and was destroyed.

Clément Ader went on to build other flying machines and remained interested in flight for the remainder of his life.
... This Day in Aviation

For more information, go to http://www.flyingmachines.org/ader.html

This old model is available at http://digilander.libero.it/ucontrol2000/U-Control-2000/eole.htm

And a newer version of this model is available at Fiddlers Green, http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/aircraft/Eole-Flyingmachine.html.  I don't know which is better for fit, but the FG model is a bit larger
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2422
  • Kudos 26
Re: October (2016)
« Reply #9 on: October 10, 2016, 12:47:03 PM »
October 10, 1857 American Chess Association Formed (NYC)



Paul Morphy, the American wonder, won the 1857 New York Tournament.  He won with a score of 14 wins, one loss and three draws, was the only tournament that Morphy competed in during his brief and spectacular career. He planned to enter the 1858 Birmingham International tournament as part of his tour of England and Europe. Due to itinerary problems and other factors, he withdrew from the contest and played only matches, displays and casual games during the tour.

You can find a competition-style chess set at http://www.jleslie48.com/gallery_models_other.html#m22, though there are several others to be found on the net.

There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2422
  • Kudos 26
Re: October (2016)
« Reply #10 on: October 11, 2016, 12:09:01 PM »
October 11, 1910 Teddy Roosevelt Becomes First President to Fly



Quote
Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., was the first President of the United States of America to fly aboard an airplane. At Kinloch Field, St. Louis, Missouri, (now, Lambert–St. Louis International Airport) Arch Hoxsey, a member of the Wright demonstration team, invited the former president for a flight. Initially Roosevelt declined, but then accepted the offer to accompany Hoxsey aboard the Wright Flyer.
...This Day in Aviation

Watch the video at http://www.airspacemag.com/video/Teddy-Roosevelt-Goes-Flying.html

“It was great! First class! It was the finest experience I have ever had,” he declared. “I wish I could stay up for an hour, but I haven’t the time this afternoon.” ... Theodore Roosevelt

Unfortunately I could not find the 1910 Wright Flyer.  The Canon and FG Wright Flyers are of earlier versions, and even though there are more versions (from Styrofoam trays at another site), they are also earlier versions.

So you are stuck with a Teddy Roosevelt cubee.  http://web.archive.org/web/20120501153430/http://7ater.com/cubee/2010/01/21/26-theodore-roosevelt/comment-page-1/



I really wish Zio would have done some of the famous Americans, but that will never be...
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet