Author Topic: October (2016)  (Read 1238 times)

Vermin King

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Re: October (2016)
« Reply #22 on: October 22, 2016, 11:40:14 AM »
October 22, 1938 Christopher Lloyd Born



One Hundred Ninety-One film and television credits, but when you hear of Christopher Lloyd, almost invariably you think of Doc.

Today's model isn't going to be one of the typical Delorean models, but instead, the town square vignette.



You can find this diorama at http://www.maquettes-papier.net/forumenpapier/topic12860.html
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Vermin King

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Re: October (2016)
« Reply #23 on: October 23, 2016, 02:22:53 PM »
October 23, 1962  USAF Major Robert A Rushworth takes X-15 to 40,800m



Maj. Rushworth made 34 flights in the X-15, more than any other pilot.  He would later reach 285,000 feet, which earned him his Astronaut Wings.

Ken West has an outstanding model of the X-15 at http://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-32-x-15.html

For those of my skill level, you might try the Fiddlers Green X-15 at http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/aircraft/North-American-X15.html
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Vermin King

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Re: October (2016)
« Reply #24 on: October 24, 2016, 12:45:15 PM »
October 24, 1944 Ace in a Day



On this date, David McCampbell shot down nine enemy aircraft. 

Quote
“Ace of Aces” David McCampbell (1910-1996) and one other fighter faced 60 planes approaching US forces. He shot down 9 “Zekes” and with his comrade managed to scatter the remaining 51 planes at the battle of Leyte Gulf. “All available fighter pilots! Man your planes!” boomed the squawk box in Essex’ ready room. The ship’s radar had detected three large groups of Japanese planes coming in. David McCampbell, the CAG and the Navy’s most famous living aviator, considered this announcement. Earlier that morning, Admiral Sherman himself had forbidden McCampbell from joining a dawn sortie. Given his responsibilities as Commander of Essex’ Air Group and his public prominence as a top ace, McCampbell was too valuable. He decided that he was indeed “available” and headed for his airplane, Minsi III. His plane crew hurried to fuel Minsi III, which had not been scheduled to fly that day. With the Hellcat only partially fueled, the Flight Officer ordered it off the flight deck – either into the air or below to the hangar deck. McCampbell went up, leading Essex’s last seven fighters toward the Jap strike force. He and Ens. Roy Rushing got out in front of the other Hellcats, putting on all speed to intercept the Japs, then only 22 miles away. He directed the other F6F’s to get the bombers, while he and Rushing tackled the fighters. Surprisingly, the enemy fighters turned, allowing McCampbell and Rushing to gain altitude and a position behind them. Seeing over 40 Japanese fighters, McCampbell radioed back to the carrier for help. “Sorry, none available.” The enemy planes spread out in a typical formation of three V’s. McCampbell picked out a Zero on the extreme right and flamed it. Rushing also got one on this first pass. Incredibly, there was no reaction from the Japs as they climbed back up to regain altitude. The two Hellcat pilots dived back down on their quarry for another pass; McCampbell blew up a second Zero. Now the gaggle of Zeros, Tonys, Hamps, and Oscars reacted – by going into a Lufbery! McCampbell made a couple of head-on passes against the formation, but without results. A strange interlude ensued as McCampbell and Rushing climbed back up and circled, while the Japanese fighters continued to circle below. McCampbell radioed again for help; one of the Hellcats that had been going after the bombers headed his way. The Lufbery broke up and the planes headed toward Luzon in a wide Vee. The two American fliers closed in again on the formation. McCampbell opened up at 900 feet, and exploded his third plane of the morning. Rushing shot down his second one. Apparently low on fuel, the Japanese planes doggedly flew on, maintaining formation. On his next firing pass, gunfire coming from behind forced McCampbell to break off his attack and pull up. It was another Hellcat shooting too close to him. A few choice words straightened things out. Still the enemy planes didn’t turn and mix it up. McCampbell realized he could relax and take his time. This was practically gunnery exercise. He could focus on identifying his targets carefully. The next one was an Oscar. Again his six fifties roared anad blasted the Oscar’s wing root. It flamed for number four. Rushing had scored his third by this time. This continued for several more passes until McCampbell had downed 7 and Rushing 6. Rushing radioed that he was out of ammo, but he would stay on McCampbell’s wing while the CAG used up his remaining bullets. Two more passes and two more kills. As the Jap planes approached the security of their bases on Luzon, the two Americans’ low fuel finally ended the slaughter. The Hellcats broke off and headed for Essex. In one morning sortie, McCampbell had shot down nine enemy planes and Rushing six, an unparalleled achievement in American fighter aviation.
... This Day in U.S. Military History

You can read more about McCampbell at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_McCampbell

All 34 of McCampbell's 'kills' were in Hellcats, so today's model is http://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-50-grumman-f6f-3-hellcat-778.html
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Vermin King

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Re: October (2016)
« Reply #25 on: October 25, 2016, 03:05:02 PM »
October 25, 1944  First Kamikaze Attack of World War II

“On this day in 1944, during the Battle of the Leyte Gulf, the Japanese deploy kamikaze ("divine wind") suicide bombers against American warships for the first time. It will prove costly--to both sides.
“All told, more than 1,321 Japanese aircraft crash-dived their planes into Allied warships during the war, desperate efforts to reverse the growing Allied advantage in the Pacific. While approximately 3,000 Americans and Brits died because of these attacks, the damage done did not prevent the Allied capture of the Philippines, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa.”  from History.com



Various kamikaze models are found at http://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/catalogsearch/result/?q=kamikaze
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Re: October (2016)
« Reply #26 on: October 26, 2016, 04:47:58 PM »
October 26, 1962  Last B-52-H Stratofortress



Quote
The very last Boeing B-52 Stratofortress was delivered to the United States Air Force. B-52H-175-BW 61-0040, which was rolled out at Wichita, Kansas, 22 June 1962, was the 744th B-52 built by Boeing at its Seattle and Wichita plants.

The B-52 Stratofortress is a long range strategic bomber powered by eight jet engines. The first flight took place 15 April 1952 at Boeing Field, Seattle, Washington, when test pilots Alvin M. (“Tex”) Johnston and Lieutenant Colonel Guy M. Townsend, U.S. Air Force, took off in the second prototype, the YB-52, serial number 49-231. The first production aircraft, B-52A-1-BO, 52-001, was rolled out at Boeing’s Plant 2 on 18 March 1954. The first operational Stratofortress, an RB-52B-15-BO, 52-8711, was delivered to the Strategic Air Command’s 93d Bombardment Wing (Heavy) at Castle Air Force Base, California, 29 June 1955. (52-8711 was retired 29 September 1965 and is on display at the Strategic Air and Space Museum, Offutt AFB, Nebraska.)

Boeing’s Seattle Plant 2 produced B-52 A, B, C model Stratofortresses, with D, E, and F versions built both there and at Wichita, Kansas. With the introduction of the B-52G, all bomber production was shifted to Wichita in 1957. The Wichita plant produced the B-52D through B-52H bombers from 1955 until production ended in 1962.

The Stratofortress was designed as a strategic bomber armed with nuclear bombs. It was originally powered by turbojet engines, but more powerful and efficient turbofan engines were introduced with the final version, the B-52H.

B-52D and B-52F Stratofortresses were first used in combat during the Vietnam War when they carried as many as 108 500-pound bombs to attack industrial targets in North Vietnam and enemy troop concentrations. Thirty B-52s were lost due to enemy action during the war. Most of these bombers were lost to radar-guided surface to air missiles. Three B-52D crews are credited with air-to-air victories, when they each shot down a Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG 21 interceptor with their four tail-mounted .50-caliber Browning machine guns. (The B-52H was equipped with a 20mm M61 Vulcan rotary cannon, though this has been removed.)

The Stratofortress was used during Operation Desert Storm in 1991, Operation Allied Force in 1999, and Operation Enduring Freedom from 2001 to the present.

The B-52H is the only version still in service. 102 were built and as of 19 May 2016, 75, including 61-0040, are still in service. Beginning in 2013, the Air Force began a fleet-wide technological upgrade for the B-52H, including a digital avionics and communications system, as well as an internal weapons bay upgrade. The bomber is expected to remain in service until 2040.

The B-52H is a sub-sonic, swept wing, long-range strategic bomber. It has a crew of five. The airplane is 159 feet, 4 inches (48.6 meters) long, with a wing span of 185 feet (56.4 meters). It is 40 feet, 8 inches (12.4 meters) high to the top of the vertical fin. Maximum Takeoff Weight (MTOW) is 488,000 pounds (221,353 kilograms).

There are eight Pratt & Whitney TF33-PW-3 turbofan engines mounted in two-engine pods suspended under the wings on four pylons. Each engine produces a maximum of 17,000 pounds of thrust (75.620 kilonewtons). The TF-33 is a two-spool axial-flow turbofan engine with 2 fan stages, 14-stage compressor stages (7 stage intermediate pressure, 7 stage high-pressure) and and 4-stage turbine (1 stage high-pressure, 3-stage low-pressure). The engine is 11 feet, 10 inches (3.607 meters) long, 4 feet, 5.0 inches (1.346 meters) in diameter and weighs 3,900 pounds (15,377 kilograms).

The B-52H can carry approximately 70,000 pounds (31,750 kilograms) of ordnance, including free-fall bombs, precision-guided bombs, thermonuclear bombs and cruise missiles, naval mines and anti-ship missiles.

The bomber’s cruise speed is 520 miles per hour (837 kilometers per hour) and its maximum speed is 650 miles per hour (1,046 kilometers per hour) at 23,800 feet (7,254 meters) at a combat weight of 306,350 pounds. Its service ceiling is 47,700 feet (14,539 meters) at the same combat weight. The unrefueled range is 8,000 miles (12,875 kilometers).

With inflight refueling, the Stratofortress’s range is limited only by the endurance of its five-man crew.

...ThisDayinAviation



You can get Gary Pilsworth's B-52H at http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/vbdownloads.php?do=download&downloadid=700
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Vermin King

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Re: October (2016)
« Reply #27 on: October 27, 2016, 11:04:43 AM »
October 27, 1961  First Saturn Launch Vehicle Makes Flight Test from Cape Canaveral

The Saturn I made its maiden flight on October 27, 1961 with a dummy upper stage and partially fueled first stage.  It was the opinion at the time that no initial test would be successful, so they cleared anything that could be cleared.  Opinion was wrong this time.



This and other Saturn models are available at http://jleslie48.com/gallery_models_apollo.html
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Re: October (2016)
« Reply #28 on: October 28, 2016, 11:33:19 AM »
October 28 Dual Post: 
1886  Statue of Liberty Dedicated
1965  Gateway Arch Completed




Canon offers the Statue of Liberty at http://cp.c-ij.com/en/contents/CNT-0011271/index.html
Wurlington Brothers have a simple Arch, http://www.wurlington-bros.com/DC/Gateway.html
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Re: October (2016)
« Reply #29 on: October 29, 2016, 08:38:34 AM »
October 29, 1998  John Glenn Returns to Space



Senator John Herschel Glenn, Jr., the first American to orbit the Earth, returned to space as a member of the Discovery STS-95 crew. At the age of 77, John Glenn was the oldest human to fly into space.

You can find Discovery STS-95 at http://www.axmpaperspacescalemodels.com/download4.html#.VFEqbE10yM9
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Re: October (2016)
« Reply #30 on: October 30, 2016, 04:49:20 PM »
October 30, 1953  Dr. Albert Schweitzer and General George C Marshall win Nobel Peace Prize





You can get your own Nobel Prize at http://paper-replika.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1902:nobel-prize-medal&catid=45&Itemid=200144
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Vermin King

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Re: October (2016)
« Reply #31 on: October 31, 2016, 12:39:51 PM »
November 1, 1939  Heinkel He 178 Demonstrated to German Air Ministry



The Heinkel He 178 was the world's first aircraft to fly under turbojet power
   
Nobi's model is available at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/catalogsearch/result/?q=he-178
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