Author Topic: November (2016)  (Read 1383 times)

Vermin King

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November (2016)
« on: November 01, 2016, 10:12:32 AM »
November 1, 1946 Dennis Muren Born



Special Effects guy, with an amazing filmography:  Paranormal Activity 4, Super 8, War of the Worlds, Hulk, A.I. Artificial Intelligence, Jurassic Park, Terminator 2, The Abyss, Ghostbusters II, Willow, Innerspace, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Star Wars, E. T., Dragonslayer, Battlestar Galactica, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Flesh Gordon, Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, Rocketship X-M [1979 revision]

Today's model is the Millenium Falcon by Oliver Bizer:  http://cutandfold.info/cutandfoldforum/index.php?topic=564.0



Haven't heard from Olli in a while.  I hope he is doing all right
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2016, 01:06:59 PM »
November 2, 1947  Hughes Flies the Spruce Goose



Developed for the war, but not completed until after, the Spruce Goose was flown only once.  At the time it was the largest aircraft built.  It is still the largest wooden aircraft and largest flying boat.



Aaron Murphy's Spruce Goose is available at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-125-hughes-hk-1-hercules-the-spruce-goose-paper-model.html
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2016, 10:46:23 AM »
November 3, 1954 Original Godzilla Released

The original movie was released in Japan, not an actual monster.  Thanks, Dave, for pointing this out



If you have a Japan ip address and an Epson printer, you can get a very detailed Godzilla, but  I was able to locate the old Kaiju models, and the link to get to them.  http://papertoyadventures.com/downloads-2/downloads-kaiju/

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Vermin King

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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2016, 10:56:49 AM »
November 4, 1922 King Tut's Tomb Entrance Discovered



Quote
British archaeologist Howard Carter and his workmen discover a step leading to the tomb of King Tutankhamen in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt.

When Carter first arrived in Egypt in 1891, most of the ancient Egyptian tombs had been discovered, though the little-known King Tutankhamen, who had died when he was 18, was still unaccounted for. After World War I, Carter began an intensive search for "King Tut's Tomb," finally finding steps to the burial room hidden in the debris near the entrance of the nearby tomb of King Ramses VI in the Valley of the Kings. On November 26, 1922, Carter and fellow archaeologist Lord Carnarvon entered the interior chambers of the tomb, finding them miraculously intact.

Thus began a monumental excavation process in which Carter carefully explored the four-room tomb over several years, uncovering an incredible collection of several thousand objects. The most splendid architectural find was a stone sarcophagus containing three coffins nested within each other. Inside the final coffin, which was made out of solid gold, was the mummy of the boy-king Tutankhamen, preserved for more than 3,000 years. Most of these treasures are now housed in the Cairo Museum.
... History.com

Of course there is Mauther's Death Mask, http://papermau.blogspot.com.br/2011/07/tutankamons-death-mask-mascara.html
But I also like JOssorio's little pieces, http://librosgratispapercraftymas.blogspot.com/2012/12/tutankamon.html and http://librosgratispapercraftymas.blogspot.com/2013/03/sarcofago-de-tutankamon.html
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2016, 09:20:31 AM »
November 5, 1605  The Gunpowder Plot

The Gunpowder Plot of 1605 was a failed assassination attempt against King James I of England and VI of Scotland by a group of provincial English Catholics led by Robert Catesby.

The plan was to blow up the House of Lords during the State Opening of England's Parliament on 5 November 1605, as the prelude to a popular revolt in the Midlands during which James's nine-year-old daughter, Princess Elizabeth, was to be installed as the Catholic head of state. Catesby may have embarked on the scheme after hopes of securing greater religious tolerance under King James had faded, leaving many English Catholics disappointed.

Guy Fawkes was found guarding 36 barrels of gunpowder.

Bonfire Night, later known as Guy Fawkes Day, celebrated the fact that James I survived the assassination attempt. 

You can find a 3D Guy Fawkes mask at http://mckack.tumblr.com/post/1414374398/guy-fawkes-papercraft-mask-download



This post from 2013 got me started on a great rabbit trail.  Shakespeare's nephew was in on this BTW
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2016, 01:41:26 PM »
November 6, 1945 First Jet Landing on an Aircraft Carrier

The Ryan FR Fireball was a composite propeller and jet-powered aircraft designed for the United States Navy during World War II. On 6 November 1945, a Fireball of VF-41 became the first aircraft to land under jet power on an aircraft carrier, albeit unintentionally. After the radial engine of an FR-1 failed on final approach to the escort carrier USS Wake Island, the pilot managed to start the jet engine and land, barely catching the last arrestor wire before hitting the ship's crash barrier.



You can pick up your own Fireball at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-72-ryan-fr-1-fireball-paper-model.html
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #6 on: November 07, 2016, 12:22:23 PM »
November 7, 1980   Steve McQueen Dies

McQueen died while undergoing an experimental treatment for mesothelioma, a type of cancer often related to asbestos exposure.  It's possible that he was exposed from racing gear.  Terence Steven McQueen was only 50 years old.

McQueen was the perfect anti-hero in the movies, but also raced motorcycles and automobiles.  Today's model comes from Lemans from 1971.



Thank Dave for the model from the KoolWheelz page, http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/racerz.html

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Vermin King

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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2016, 11:38:18 AM »
November 8, 1847 Bram Stoker Born

Quote
On this day in 1847, Bram Stoker, author of the horror novel “Dracula,” is born in Clontarf, Dublin, Ireland. Stoker’s villainous, blood-sucking creation, the vampire Count Dracula, became a pop-culture icon and has been featured in hundreds of movies, books, plays and other forms of entertainment.

After overcoming a childhood filled with health problems that frequently left him bedridden, Stoker graduated from Trinity College in Dublin. He then worked for the Irish Civil Service while writing theater reviews for a Dublin newspaper on the side. His drama reviews brought him to the attention of Sir Henry Irving (1838-1905), a tall, dark and well-regarded actor of the Victorian era who was said to have served as an influence for Stoker’s Count Dracula. Stoker eventually became Irving’s manager and also worked as a manager for the Lyceum Theater in London. He published several horror novels in the 1890s before the debut of his most famous work, “Dracula,” in 1897.

Set in Victorian England, “Dracula” is the story of a centuries-old vampire and Transylvania nobleman, Count Dracula, who roams around at night biting the throats of human victims, whose blood he needs to survive. The concept of vampires didn’t originate with Stoker: These mythical creatures, who cast no shadows, have no reflections in mirrors and can be killed with a stake through their hearts, actually first appeared in ancient folklore. English writer John William Polidori’s 1819 short story “The Vampyre” is credited with kick-starting modern literature’s vampire genre.

Stoker’s novel has been adapted for the big screen several times. An unauthorized version of the book was made into a 1922 German film, “Nosferatu.” In 1931, Universal Pictures released the well-received “Dracula,” which starred Hungarian-born actor Bela Lugosi (1882-1956) in the title role. (The Library of Congress later labeled the movie culturally significant and added it to the National Film Registry.) Universal went on to release such related films as “Dracula’s Daughter” (1936), “Son of Dracula” (1943) and “House of Dracula” (1945). In the 1950s, 60s and 70s, English actor Christopher Lee (1922-) starred in a series of Dracula productions from Hammer Films, including “Horror of Dracula” (1958), “Dracula: Prince of Darkness” (1966) and “Scars of Dracula” (1970). In 1992, director Francis Ford Coppola (“The Godfather,” “Apocalypse Now”) had a blockbuster hit with “Bram Stoker’s Dracula,” which featured English actor Gary Oldman (1958-) in the lead. The Dracula oeuvre also includes such productions as the 1972 blaxploitation film “Blacula” and director Mel Brooks’ 1995 parody, “Dracula: Dead and Loving It,” starring Leslie Nielsen (1926-).

The vampire genre as a whole has proved to be box-office gold in Hollywood. In 1994, Anne Rice’s 1976 novel “Interview with the Vampire: The Vampire Chronicles” was made into a hit movie starring Tom Cruise (1962-) as the vampire Lestat. In 2008, the big-screen adaptation of “Twilight,” author Stephenie Meyer’s 2005 best-selling vampire novel for young adults, scored big at the box office.

Bram Stoker died at the age of 64 on April 20, 1912, in London. He published other novels after “Dracula,” but none achieved the same level of success.
... History.com

For the model, I'm going with the Ravensblight Pop-Up Vampires, http://ravensblight.com/popupvampires.html

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Vermin King

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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2016, 12:49:26 PM »
November 9, 2016 Donald Trump Declared Winner in Presidential Election

First time someone who has never held a political office or was a general ended up winning the election.

Buckle your seatbelts and return your trays to the upright and locked position.  It's likely to be a bumpy ride.

Hopefully not.

For the model, I'm going with the life-size mask of the Donald at http://www.tamasoft.co.jp/pepakura-en/gallery/gallerydetails.php?id=1626



How did we drop so low that this was the better choice ...
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Dave Winfield

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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2016, 03:45:24 PM »
LOL

The Family Trumpster

"How did we drop so low that this was the better choice ...
"
Realistically, you should wait four years before you ask that question.
You never know, he might surprise you.
Either that, or armageddon.

When I was a kid...in England...the word "trump" meant fart.
Just sayin.
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2016, 10:59:07 AM »
November 10, 1975 Edmund Fitzgerald Sinks



Quote
The SS Edmund Fitzgerald sinks 17 miles from the entrance to Whitefish Bay on Lake Superior, taking all 29 crew members with her.

At the time of its launch in 1958, the 729-foot-long freighter was the largest and fastest ship on the Great Lakes. The Edmund Fitzgerald began its last journey on November 9, 1975, carrying 26,116 tons of iron-ore pellets. The next day, the ship and her crew met a storm with 60 mph winds and waves in excess of 15 feet. Captain Ernest McSorley steered the ship north, heading for the safety of Whitefish Bay, but the ship's radar failed, and the storm took out the power to Whitefish Point's radio beacon, leaving the Fitzgerald traveling blind. In the heavy seas, the vessel was also taking on a dangerous amount of water. Another ship, the Anderson, kept up radio contact with the Fitzgerald and tried to lead it to safety but to no avail.

Just after 7 p.m. on November 10, the Fitzgerald made its last radio transmission. Presumably, the ship, which was taking on water, was forced lower and lower into the water until its bow pitched down into the lake and the vessel was unable to recover. None of the 29 men aboard survived.

The Edmund Fitzgerald now lies under 530 feet of water, broken in two sections. On July 4, 1995, the ship's bell was recovered from the wreck, and a replica, engraved with the names of the crew members who perished in this tragedy, was left in its place. The original bell is on display at the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum at Whitefish Point in Michigan.
... History.com

You can find Bryan Tan's model at http://rocketmantan.deviantart.com/art/Edmund-Fitzgerald-Paper-Model-375508622

There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet