Author Topic: November (2016)  (Read 1124 times)

Vermin King

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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #11 on: November 11, 2016, 11:55:36 AM »
November 11, 1978 General Lee First Flight



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On this day in 1978, a stuntman on the Georgia set of “The Dukes of Hazzard” launches the show’s iconic automobile, a 1969 Dodge Charger named the General Lee, off a makeshift dirt ramp and over a police car. That jump, 16 feet high and 82 feet long (its landing totaled the car), made TV history. Although more than 300 different General Lees appeared in the series, which ran on CBS from 1979 until 1985, this first one was the only one to play a part in every episode: That jump over the squad car ran every week at the end of the show’s opening credits.

The General Lee was a neon-orange Charger with “01” painted on the doors, a Confederate flag on the roof, and a horn that played the first 12 notes of the song “Dixie.” It belonged to the Dukes of Hazzard themselves, the cousins Bo (played by actor John Schneider) and Luke Duke (actor Tom Wopat), who used it to get out of dangerous scrapes and away from the corrupt county commissioner Boss Hogg. Scenes featuring the General Lee are some of the show’s most memorable: Luke Duke sliding sideways across the car’s hood; the boys hopping feet-first through the windows (the Charger’s doors were welded shut, so the windows were the only way to get in and out); the General flying over ditches, half-open drawbridges and police cruisers.

Because practically every one of the General Lee’s stunts ended up wrecking the car, the show’s prop masters bought every 1969 Dodge Charger they could find (and there were plenty: the Chrysler Corporation sold about 85,000 in all). Then they outfitted each one for action, adding a roll cage to the inside, a protective push bar to the nose and heavy-duty shock absorbers and springs to the suspension. The prop masters also tampered with the brakes to make it easier to do the 180-degree “Bootleggers’ Turn” that so often helped the Duke boys evade Boss Hogg. Cars used for jumps also got trunks full of concrete or lead ballast to keep them from flipping over in midair.

While “The Dukes of Hazzard” was on the air, the General Lee got about 35,000 fan letters each month. Fans bought millions of remote-controlled and toy versions of the car, and some even modified their real cars to look like the Dukes’ Charger. Indianapolis DJ Travis Bell restored the original General Lee in 2006.
... History.com

You can get you own General Lee at http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/starcarz.html.  You know you want to do some pretend jumps with it humming the Dukes theme song and making engine and crash noises.  Have fun



My cousin got married last summer, and the building in that photo looks a lot like the venue for their wedding.  Hmmm
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #12 on: November 12, 2016, 02:22:56 PM »
November 12, 1861 The Fingal Successfully Runs Union Blockade into Savannah

The merchant ship Fingal ran the blockade into Savannah, Georgia, with a large cargo of weapons and military supplies. This is the first successful blockade run purely for the benefit of the Confederate war effort.  After Union forces closed the exits from Savannah, preventing her further use as a blockade runner, Fingal was converted to a casemate ironclad and renamed Atlanta.



You can find the model at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-200-css-atlanta-ironclad-paper-model.html
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #13 on: November 13, 2016, 01:38:04 PM »
November 13, 1981 Canadarm Tested in Space

Canadarm remote manipulator performs flawlessly in four hours of tests on board the space shuttle Columbia STS-2; Canada's $100 million robot arm made by Spar Aerospace in Toronto; tests include manual and automatic modes of operation, ease of control, operation of joints and positioning accuracy; its wrist-mounted camera also put through its paces.



You can find the model of Columbia STS-2 at http://www.axmpaperspacescalemodels.com/old/download1.html

They have no downloadable payload for this mission, but you can get the Canadarm from one of the other downloadable mission payloads.  I was hoping to be more specific, but the site is a bit glitchy today
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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #14 on: November 14, 2016, 01:29:19 PM »
November 14, 1994 1st Trains for Public Run in English Channel Tunnel

Tunnelling commenced in 1988, and the tunnel began operating in 1994.  A two-inch (50-mm) diameter pilot hole allowed the service tunnel to break through without ceremony on 30 October 1990.  Eurotunnel completed the tunnel on time, and the tunnel was officially opened one year later than originally planned by Queen Elizabeth II and the French president, François Mitterrand, in a ceremony held in Calais on 6 May 1994.



You can find the model of the Shuttle in original livery at http://www.currell.net/models/eurotunnel_loco.htm
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #15 on: November 15, 2016, 11:57:06 AM »
November 15, 1859 Final Installment of Tale of Two Cities



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On this day in 1859, Charles Dickens’ serialized novel, A Tale of Two Cities, comes to a close, as the final chapter is published in Dickens’ circular, All the Year Round.

Dickens was born in 1812 and attended school in Portsmouth. His father, a clerk in the navy pay office, was thrown in debtors’ prison in 1824, and 12-year-old Charles was sent to work in a factory. The miserable treatment of children and the institution of the debtors’ jail became topics of several of Dickens’ novels.

In his late teens, Dickens became a reporter and started publishing humorous short stories when he was 21. In 1836, a collection of his stories,  Sketches by Boz, was published. The same year, he married Catherine Hogarth, with whom he would have nine children.

The success of Dicken’s first work of fiction, Sketches by Boz, later known as The Pickwick Papers was soon reproduced with Oliver Twist (1838) and Nicholas Nickleby (1839). In 1841, Dickens published two more novels, then spent five months in the United States, where he was welcomed as a literary hero. Dickens never lost momentum as a writer, churning out major novels every year or two, often in serial form. Among his most important works are David Copperfield(1850), Great Expectations (1861), and A Tale of Two Cities (1859).

Beginning in 1850, he published his own weekly circular of fiction, poetry, and essays called  Household Words. He folded the circular in 1859 and launched another, All the Year Round, which included the first chapter of A Tale of Two Cities. In 1858, Dickens separated from his wife and began a long association with a young actress. He gave frequent readings, which became immensely popular. He died in 1870 at the age of 58, with his last novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, still unfinished.
...History.com

Spoilers!  For the model, let's go with Tektonten's guillotine, http://tektonten.blogspot.com/2009/10/barbie-scale-guillotine-papercraft.html

As if anyone out of 8th grade hasn't had to read the book...
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #16 on: November 16, 2016, 11:40:26 AM »
November 16, 1821 Becknell Opens Trade on Santa Fe Trail



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On this day, Missouri Indian trader William Becknell arrives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, sells his goods at an enormous profit, and makes plans to return the next year over the route that will become known as the Santa Fe Trail.

Pure luck made Becknell the first businessman to revive the American trade with Santa Fe. Fearing American domination of the region, the Spanish had closed their Southwest holdings to foreigners following the Pike expedition more than a decade earlier. They threw the few traders who violated the policy into prison and confiscated their goods. However, Becknell and other merchants continued to trade with the Indians on the American-controlled eastern slope of the southern Rockies. While on such an expedition in the fall of 1821, Becknell encountered a troop of Mexican soldiers. They informed Becknell that they had recently won their independence in a war with Spain, and the region was again open to American traders. Becknell immediately sped to Santa Fe, where he found a lucrative market for his goods, and his saddlebags were heavy with Mexican silver when he returned to his base in Franklin, Missouri.

The next summer Becknell traveled to Santa Fe again, this time with three wagonloads of goods. Instead of following the old route that passed over a dangerous high pass, however, Becknell blazed a shorter and easier cutoff across the Cimarron Desert. Thus, while much of the route he followed had been used by Mexican traders for decades, Becknell’s role in reopening the trail and laying out the short-cut earned him the title of “Father of the Santa Fe Trail.” It became one of the most important and lucrative of the Old West trading routes; merchants and other travelers continued to follow the trail blazed by Becknell until the arrival of trains in the late 1870s.
... History.com

For the model, I'm going with Fiddlers Green's Freight Wagon, http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/buildings/freight.html
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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #17 on: November 17, 2016, 10:43:55 AM »
November 17, 1944 Another Rescue Run in the Pacific



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Out in the remoteness of the Pacific the prospects of survival for any downed pilot were never going to be good. With the arrival of the USAAF 2nd Emergency Squadron flying out of Pitoe Strip in Morotai ( now Indonesia), the odds improved. Using OA-10A’s (equivalent to Navy PBY-5A’s) the Second Emergency Rescue Squadron retrieved over 300 airmen from death or capture during the first six months of its activity. For the crew of the 2nd Emergency Rescue Squadron flying boats, 17 November 1944 was a day like many others over the wide expanse of the ocean and remote islands.
... World War II Today

On this day they picked up three survivors.

You can find the PBY-5A at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-50-consolidated-vultee-pby-5-catalina.html
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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #18 on: November 18, 2016, 11:39:44 AM »
November 18, 1996 Bird Expert Sentenced for Smuggling Birds



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Tony Silva, a world-renowned expert and outspoken protector of exotic birds, is sentenced to seven years in prison without parole for leading an illegal parrot smuggling operation. Silva was only one of many to be arrested during "Operation Renegade," a three-year international probe into bird smuggling by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Division of Law Enforcement, although his case was by far the best known.

Silva's indictment and guilty plea shocked the international community of academic experts, conservationists, zoologists, and collectors interested in exotic birds, most of whom had known and respected him as a benevolent bird lover. Since his childhood, Silva had championed the cause of protecting wildlife. His parents, who had emigrated to the U.S. from Cuba when he was a boy, encouraged his love of birds, thinking it was a good way to keep their son out of trouble. Silva began breeding birds at a young age, and, by his 20s, he had already written hundreds of articles and two books on rare parrots and had been named curator of Loro Park, a wildlife sanctuary in the Canary Islands.

However, Silva's image greatly changed when he was accused of smuggling more than 100 hyacinth macaws, valued at almost $1.4 million, as well as hundreds of other exotic birds. Hyacinth macaws are extremely rare, having a wild population numbering between only 2,000 and 5,000. During smuggling operations, many of the birds die.

U.S. District Court Judge Elaine Bucklo, outraged at the inhumane treatement the birds had received at the hands of the smugglers, handed down a uniquely harsh sentence in the Silva case: an 82-month prison term, a $100,000 fine and an order to perform 200 hours of community service during a three-year supervised release program after his prison term. "The real victims of these crimes, " the judge said, "were the birds themselves and our children and future generations who may never have the opportunity to see any of these rare birds."

Silva later claimed that he was set up and had only been trying to protect the birds.  However, many disagree with Silva's interpretation of the events, citing the evidence from his trial, which included photographs of dead parrots, a book detailing his smuggling operations found at his home, and a taped conversation of Silva saying that he had 50 hyacinth macaws for sale.
... History.com

I think the more environmentally responsible way to do exotic birds is either, the parrots from Epson, http://www.epson.com.hk/files/minisite/papercraft/animal.htm, Konica Minolta, http://www.konicaminolta.jp/about/csr/environment/env_contents/paperkraft/index.html, or Yamaha, http://global.yamaha-motor.com/yamahastyle/entertainment/papercraft/animal-global/index.html.  The Yamaha one is actually a Hyacinth Macaw
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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #19 on: November 19, 2016, 09:18:27 AM »
November 19, 1863 Gettysburg Address



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On November 19, 1863, at the dedication of a military cemetery at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, during the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln delivers one of the most memorable speeches in American history. In just 272 words, Lincoln brilliantly and movingly reminded a war-weary public why the Union had to fight, and win, the Civil War.

The Battle of Gettysburg, fought some four months earlier, was the single bloodiest battle of the Civil War. Over the course of three days, more than 45,000 men were killed, injured, captured or went missing. The battle also proved to be the turning point of the war: General Robert E. Lee’s defeat and retreat from Gettysburg marked the last Confederate invasion of Northern territory and the beginning of the Southern army’s ultimate decline.

Charged by Pennsylvania’s governor, Andrew Curtin, to care for the Gettysburg dead, an attorney named David Wills bought 17 acres of pasture to turn into a cemetery for the more than 7,500 who fell in battle. Wills invited Edward Everett, one of the most famous orators of the day, to deliver a speech at the cemetery’s dedication. Almost as an afterthought, Wills also sent a letter to Lincoln—just two weeks before the ceremony—requesting “a few appropriate remarks” to consecrate the grounds.

At the dedication, the crowd listened for two hours to Everett before Lincoln spoke. Lincoln’s address lasted just two or three minutes. The speech reflected his redefined belief that the Civil War was not just a fight to save the Union, but a struggle for freedom and equality for all, an idea Lincoln had not championed in the years leading up to the war. This was his stirring conclusion: “The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

Reception of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address was initially mixed, divided strictly along partisan lines. Nevertheless, the “little speech,” as he later called it, is thought by many today to be the most eloquent articulation of the democratic vision ever written.
...History.com

You can get the Gettysburg Lutheran Seminary at http://gamerarchitect.blogspot.com/2011/12/paper-building-15mm-acw-gattysburg.html.  There is a model of the Evergreen Cemetery Gate out there, too, but I can only find it on pirate sites
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #20 on: November 20, 2016, 07:31:51 PM »
November 20, 1917 Cambrai Tank Attack



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At dawn on the morning of November 20, 1917, six infantry and two cavalry divisions of the British Expeditionary Force--with additional support from 14 squadrons of the Royal Flying Corps--join the British Tank Corps in a surprise attack on the German lines near Cambrai, France.

After the British debuted the first armored tanks during the massive Somme offensive in September 1916, their effectiveness as a weapon--aside from the initial value of surprise--was quickly thrown into doubt. The early tanks were maddeningly slow and unwieldy; navigation and visibility from their controls were poor and though they were impervious to small arms fire, they could be destroyed easily by shellfire. Moreover, the tanks often bogged down in the muddy terrain of the Western Front in fall and winter, rendering them completely useless.

As a result, by the fall of 1917 many on the Allied side had come to doubt the viability of the tank as a major force on the battlefield. Commanders of the British Tank Corps nevertheless continued to press for a new offensive, including the large-scale use of tanks on a comparably dry stretch of battlefield in northern France, between the Canal du Nord and St. Quentin, towards the Belgian border. After initially vetoing the idea, British Commander in Chief Sir Douglas Haig changed his mind and authorized the operation, hoping to achieve at least one useful victory before the year was out. The attack, led by General Julian Byng of the British 3rd Army, went ahead on the morning of November 20, 1917, with all available tanks--some 476 of them--advancing on the German lines with infantry, cavalry and air support. Within hours, the British forced the German 2nd Army back to Cambrai, to the north, taking some 8,000 prisoners and 100 guns on their way.

The British lacked adequate support for their initial advance, however, and more gains were significantly harder to obtain. Though German Commander in Chief Erich Ludendorff briefly considered a general withdrawal of troops from the area, his commander in the region, Georg von der Marwitz, managed to muster a sharp German counterattack of nearly 20 divisions to regain nearly all the ground lost. Casualties were high on both sides, with German losses of 50,000 compared to 45,000 for the British. While the use of tanks at Cambrai failed to achieve the major breakthrough for which Byng had been hoping, the attack nonetheless boosted the tank's reputation as a potentially effective weapon for targeted use during offensive operations.
... History.com

Of the 476 tanks deployed, the bulk of these were the Mark IV, 179 were captured or destroyed.



You can get your own Mark IV from Landships II, http://www.landships.info/landships/models.html#
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2016)
« Reply #21 on: November 21, 2016, 11:36:04 AM »
November 21, 1944 Harold Ramis Born



No!  Cross the streams!

I for one am going to miss his comedic genius.

Okay, until someone does the EM-50 Urban Assault Vehicle, we are stuck with Ghostbusters models, but since this is Egon's birthday, I will feature him.  You can find two cubee versions of Egon at http://www.cubeecraft.com/cubee/egon-spengler
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