Author Topic: December (2016)  (Read 1307 times)

Vermin King

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December (2016)
« on: December 01, 2016, 01:29:40 PM »
December 1, 1830 First Draft of The Hunchback of Notre Dame Due



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According to an agreement with his publisher, French novelist Victor Hugo is due to turn in a draft of his book Notre Dame de Paris (The Hunchback of Notre Dame) on this day in 1830. However, Hugo applies himself to other projects, extends the deadline several times, and the book is not published until 1831.

Hugo, who had decided to be a writer during his early teens, published his first collection of poetry in 1822, for which he won a pension from Louis XVIII. Also in 1822, Hugo married his childhood sweetheart, Adele Foucher, with whom he would have numerous children.

The following year, Hugo published his first novel, Han d’Islande. His 1827 play Cromwell embraced the tenets of Romanticism, which he laid out in the play’s preface. The following year, despite his contract to write Notre Dame de Paris, he set to work on two plays. The first, Marion de Lorme (1829), was censored for its candid portrayal of a courtesan. The second, Hernani, became the touchstone for a bitter and protracted debate between French Classicists and Romantics. He finally finished Notre Dame de Paris, which pled for tolerance of the imperfect and the grotesque in 1831. The book also had a simpler agenda: to increase appreciation of old Gothic structures, which had become the object of vandalism and neglect.

In the 1830s, Hugo wrote numerous plays, many of them vehicles for his mistress, the actress Juliette Drouet. In 1841, Hugo was elected to the prestigious Acadamie Francaise. Two years later, he lost his beloved daughter and her husband when they were drowned in an accident. He expressed his profound grief in a poetry collection called Les Contemplations (1856).

When Napoleon III came to power, Hugo was forced to flee France and did not return for 20 years. While still in exile, he completed Les Miserables (1862), which became a hit in France and abroad. He returned to Paris during the Franco-Prussian War and was hailed a national hero. Hugo’s writing career spanned more than six decades. He was buried in the Pantheon after his death in 1885.
...History.com

Hmmm, they totally left out his political activism which was the reason he was hailed a national hero.  Not sure why.

For the model, let's go with Canon's Notre Dame cathedral, http://cp.c-ij.com/jp/contents/CNT-0010518/index.html
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2016, 12:59:03 PM »
December 2, 1917 Ezra Stone Born

Ezra Who?

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An an actor, producer, director, writer, teacher and lecturer who covered all of the important mediums in one way or another during his lifetime, Ezra Stone will still be forever known for introducing quintessential late 30s and 40s teen Henry Aldrich to both radio and the stage. Stone's pitchy, cracking voice would become a familiar sound in living rooms for well over a decade.

He was born Ezra Chaim Feinstone on December 2, 1917, in New Bedford, Massachusetts. The son of Solomon Feinstone, a chemist, teacher and philanthropist, and the former Rose Meadow, Stone made his debut at age 6 in a play entitled "Phosphorus and Suppressed Desires" for the YMHA players in Philadelphia. He later went on to tour with the National Junior Theatre of Washington, DC, in 1931-1932 before graduating from the Oak Lane Country Day School of Temple University in 1934.

Stone studied for the stage at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts and made his New York debut playing seven roles in the musical revue "Parade" in 1935. Although the ebullient teen built up his young marquee name with such popular comedies as "Room Service," "Three Men on a Horse" and "Brother Rat," he found his pot of gold winning the stage role of Henry Aldrich in "What a Life" in 1938. More riches came his way on Broadway with the role of Dromio in "The Boys from Syracuse" and as Arthur Lee in "See My Lawyer."

Twenty years old at the time he started playing the teenage Henry on radio, Stone enjoyed a healthy 13 years (1939-1953) as the disaster-prone youth who was summoned into millions of homes to the eternal lament of his long-suffering mother: "Hen-reeee! Henry Aldrich!" -- which was invariably followed by Henry's anguished reply: "Coming Mother!" By 1941 "The Aldrich Family" was rated among the "top ten" programs alongside Jack Benny and Bob Hope's popular shows.

As for films, Stone never got it into gear. He can only be witnessed in a support role in the "B" movie Those Were the Days! (1940) as Allie Bang. He also played a cameo as himself, Sgt. Ezra Stone, in This Is the Army (1943), the feature film version of the hit Broadway play he appeared in the year before.

WWII intervened in 1942 but Stone managed to incorporate his life's passion into his military duties by directing and appearing in a number of US Army Special Services productions. On October 5, 1942, Ezra married actress/director/teacher Sara Seegar. They went on to have two children, Josef and Francine.

Following the war Stone focused on writing and directing. During TV's "Golden Age" he not only wrote sketches for the sitcom The Aldrich Family (1949), which ran for four seasons, but also for shows that starred some of TV's funniest: Danny Thomas, Milton Berle, Fred Allen and Martha Raye. At around the same time he directed a number of Broadway productions including "Me and Molly," the farcical "At War with the Army," which also featured wife Sara, and "Wake Up, Darling." In the 1960s Stone started directed TV sitcoms and adventures, making the rounds on such sets as Petticoat Junction (1963), The Munsters (1964), Lost in Space (1965) and The Flying Nun (1967).

Ezra and Sara were married for 48 years until her death in 1990. Four years later, the icon of "old-time" radio was fatally injured in a one-vehicle road accident in New Jersey at age 76.
... IMDb Mini Biography By:  Gary Brumburgh / gr-home@pacbell.net

Well, later today, I believe the LIS models will be up, but for now, let's go with Dave's Munsters collection
Munster House - http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/specialz.html#accessories
Munster Coach and Drag-U-La are available at http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/starcarz.html

As is the LIS Chariot!
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2016, 09:42:31 AM »
December 3, 1839 Lincoln Admitted to Circuit Court for Practicing Law



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On this day in 1839, future President Abraham Lincoln advances to another stage in his legal career when he is admitted to practice law in the U.S. Circuit Court. It was during his years practicing law that Lincoln honed his now famous oratorical skills.

Lincoln made the first step toward becoming a lawyer in 1836 when the state of Illinois certified him as being “a person of good moral character.” (He did not attend law school but studied on his own while working as a clerk in a law office.) In 1838, he delivered closing arguments in the Jacob Early murder case, persuading the jury that his client, the defendant, had acted in self defense. In 1840, Lincoln was re-elected to the Illinois State Assembly—his third term since 1834—and by 1846 earned a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. By that time, Lincoln had begun to use his debate and speaking skills to help fellow Whigs campaign for state and national offices and, in 1848, he delivered a blistering attack on President James Polk for what Lincoln believed was an ill-advised war against Mexico. He called Polk “a bewildered, confounded, and miserably perplexed man” for waging a war that ended up costing the nation 13,780 lives and a whopping $100 million.

After losing his House seat in the election of 1848, Lincoln returned to practicing law in the state of Illinois, where he helped to establish the new Republican Party. His oratorical skills came in handy while speaking out against the Kansas-Nebraska Act (1854) and the Dred Scott decision (1857), which both served to perpetuate the practice of slavery, an institution Lincoln saw as immoral. In his 1858 campaign for a seat in the U.S. Senate, as secessionist sentiment brewed among the southern states, Lincoln warned in a campaign speech that “a house divided against itself cannot stand.” Although he did not win a Senate seat that year, he earned national recognition as a strong political force. In 1860, Lincoln was elected to the presidency.

Lincoln’s skill with words helped soothe an anxious populace throughout the Civil War. His most famous speech is the Gettysburg Address, which he delivered in the aftermath of the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. In that speech, Lincoln resolved that those killed in the battle “shall not have died in vain; that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom; and that this government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” Though less than 300 words, the Gettysburg Address is now considered a defining vision of American democracy.
...History.com

Lincoln is another one of my favorite topics.  For the model, we'll go with the Tinsley Building, where he had his first law office.

http://www.illinois.gov/ihpa/Preserve/Pages/construct_tinsley.aspx

When I used to live in Mt. Vernon, Illinois, there is another law office next to the courthouse that Lincoln used occasionally.  I wish it were available
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2016, 01:12:17 PM »
December 4, 1993 We Lost a Great One



I think I have more Zappa CD's than I have for any other artist.  At 52, he was too soon gone.

I've done my part, though.  My son is almost as big a fan as I am.  Another generation will know who he was.

You can remember Frank with the State of Shock papercraft at http://stateofshockstudios.com/zappa_paper_toy.html
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2016, 10:50:47 AM »
December 5, 1974  BBC Airs Final Monty Python Episode

It is actually hard to find Pythonesque paper models from the show (hint, hint), but I finally found one



Here's to Mr. Gumby ... My Brain Hurts!

You can find the model here:  http://www.scribd.com/doc/23146223/MrGumby-papertoy



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Dave Winfield

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2016, 07:59:59 PM »
I must apologize for missing the last two dates, until this moment.
Both touching tributes in my opinion.

I too, am a big Zappa fan...although I don't have any Zappa CDs.
Got a few mp3s of course...
but, my Zappa collection is all vinyl.

Including this gem...



...
Monty Python...considering Terry Gilliam's extensive animation work with paper cutouts
its surprising there aren't more paper related items.

But you could have used my Monty Python Instant Record Collection Scale Cube
http://www.mediafire.com/file/2t4q2qtirbv1zbz/monty_python_cube.pdf

DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!

Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2016, 09:31:15 PM »
Are there any references to a real life Joe's Garage that could be done in paper?
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Dave Winfield

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2016, 10:24:06 PM »
Joe , being a fictional character, represented any young musician practicing in his garage.
So, the "garage" of Joe's Parents house could be any garage in the USA.
Sounds like a project for Mauther? He likes doing this kind of stuff. lol
Especially music related stuff.
Just fill a garage with old Amps, Guitars and a Drum kit....and a few Catholic girls.
DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!

Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2016, 10:14:14 AM »
December 6, 1884 Washington Monument Completed



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On this day in 1884, in Washington, D.C., workers place a nine-inch aluminum pyramid atop a tower of white marble, completing the construction of an impressive monument to the city's namesake and the nation's first president, George Washington.  As early as 1783, the infant U.S. Congress decided that a statue of George Washington, the great Revolutionary War general, should be placed near the site of the new Congressional building, wherever it might be. After then-President Washington asked him to lay out a new federal capital on the Potomac River in 1791, architect Pierre L'Enfant left a place for the statue at the western end of the sweeping National Mall (near the monument's present location).

It wasn't until 1832, however--33 years after Washington's death--that anyone really did anything about the monument. That year, a private Washington National Monument Society was formed. After holding a design competition and choosing an elaborate Greek temple-like design by architect Robert Mills, the society began a fundraising drive to raise money for the statue's construction. These efforts--including appeals to the nation's schoolchildren--raised some $230,000, far short of the $1 million needed. Construction began anyway, on July 4, 1848, as representatives of the society laid the cornerstone of the monument: a 24,500-pound block of pure white marble.

Six years later, with funds running low, construction was halted. Around the time the Civil War began in 1861, author Mark Twain described the unfinished monument as looking like a "hollow, oversized chimney." No further progress was made until 1876--the centennial of American independence--when President Ulysses S. Grant authorized construction to be completed.

Made of some 36,000 blocks of marble and granite stacked 555 feet in the air, the monument was the tallest structure in the world at the time of its completion in December 1884. In the six months following the dedication ceremony, over 10,000 people climbed the nearly 900 steps to the top of the Washington Monument. Today, an elevator makes the trip far easier, and more than 800,000 people visit the monument each year. A city law passed in 1910 restricted the height of new buildings to ensure that the monument will remain the tallest structure in Washington, D.C.--a fitting tribute to the man known as the "Father of His Country."
... History.com

Aluminum?  Keep in mind, at that time, Aluminum was a precious metal. 

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Friedrich Wöhler produced 1827 pure aluminum by reacting metallic potassium (K) with anhydrous aluminum chloride (AlCl3):

AlCl3 +3K = Al + 3KCl
 
and later (1854) Henri Sainte-Claire Deville replaced the expensive potassium (K) by sodium (Na) to produce aluminum industrially. At that time aluminum was considered as a precious metal: the price of one ounce (28.3 g) of silver and aluminum was one dollar. Similar to the golden top of the Egyptian obelisks the Washinton Monument received 1884 an aluminum capstone
(http://www.peter-entner.com/E/Theory/PrincHH/PrincHH.aspx)

You can get your Washington Monument at http://www.wurlington-bros.com/DC/WashingtonMon.html
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2016, 01:08:14 PM »
December 7, 1941  The Bombing of Pearl Harbor

The surprise attack on Pearl Harbor devastated United States Naval presence in the Pacific and drew the US into WWII.





You can find Inky's model of the USS Arizona Memorial at http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/vbdownloads.php?do=download&downloadid=1027

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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2016, 09:17:17 AM »
December 8, 1942  Eight PT boats (PT 36, PT 37, PT 40, PT 43, PT 44, PT 48, PT 59, and PT 109) turn back 8 Japanese destroyers attempting to reinforce Japanese forces on Guadalcanal.

Kind of a busy boat even before the future President took command on April 23, 1943.  Still at Norfolk on 8/20/1942, ready to be shipped to the Pacific.



When the USS Northhampton was sunk on Dec 1, 1942, Capt. Larson's PT 109 did its part to rescue the crew

Then to be part of this action on December 8, 1942. 

You can find Dave's 80' 103 Class PT Boat, and the PT 109 Conversion Kit at http://papermodelshop.com/html/elco_pt_boat.html

There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet