Author Topic: December (2016)  (Read 1299 times)

Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2016, 11:34:54 AM »
December 9, 2005 The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe Released



Okay, I know that the models released by Fox are for the third movie, but Aslan was in the first one ...

You can find Aslan (and the Dawn Treader models) at http://movies.foxjapan.com/narnia3/download/index.html
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #12 on: December 10, 2016, 12:07:53 PM »
December 10, 1919 Smiths Arrive in Darwin, Australia



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Captain Sir Ross Macpherson Smith KBE, MC and Bar, DFC and Two Bars, AFC, and his brother, Lieutenant Sir Keith Macpherson Smith KBE, arrived at Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia, aboard a Vickers Vimy. Also aboard were Sergeant Jim Bennett and Sergeant Wally Shiers. The four had departed Hounslow Heath Aerodrome, London, England, on 12 November, in response to the offer of a £10,000 prize offered by the government of Australia to the first Australian airmen to fly from England to Australia aboard a British airplane.

The Smith’s airplane, a Vickers F.B.27A Vimy IV, registration G-EAOU, was built for the Royal Air Force, and given serial number F8630. It was too late to serve in combat and was not delivered to the RAF. Vickers modified it for the flight to Australia, adding additional fuel tanks. Total duration of the flight was 28 days, 17 hours, 40 minutes. The journey required 135 hours, 55 minutes of flying time. The distance flown was estimated to be 11,123 miles (17,901 kilometers). The Vimy averaged 81.84 miles per hour (131.71 kilometers per hour).
... This Day in Aviation

You can find the model at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-48-a5-vickers-vimy-g-aeou.html

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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2016, 09:52:44 AM »
December 11, 1941 Elrod First to Sink Warship with Bombs from a Fighter



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The last four aircraft of Marine Fighter Squadron 211 (VMF 211), led by Captain Henry Talmage Elrod, U.S. Marine Corps, attacked the invading Imperial Japanese Navy South Seas Force, consisting of four light cruisers, six destroyers, two patrol boats and two amphibious support ships with 450 Special Navy Landing Force soldiers, as they approached to invade the United States outpost at Wake Island. The Grumman F4F-3 Wildcats bombed the destroyer IJN Kisaragi.

VMF 211 had lost two-thirds of its aircraft on Monday, 8 December.

A few minutes earlier another destroyer, IJN Hayate, had received two direct hits in its magazines from the 5-inch/51-caliber guns of Battery L, a coast defense artillery battery of the U.S. Marines. It was hit at a range of 4,000 yards, exploded and sank with all hands. The invasion force flag ship, light cruiser IJN Yubari, received 11 direct hits from the Marine gunners. Under the combined air and artillery attacks, the invasion force withdrew.

The island finally fell to the unrelenting Japanese attacks, 23 December 1941.
... This Day in Aviation

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On December 4, 1941, Captain Elrod flew to Wake Island with twelve aircraft, twelve pilots, and the ground crew of Major Paul Putnam's fighter squadron, VMF-211. Hostilities in the air over Wake Island commenced on December 8, 1941. On December 12, he single-handedly attacked a flight of 22 enemy planes and shot down two. He executed several low-altitude bombing and strafing runs on enemy ships; during one of these attacks, he became the first man to sink a warship, the Japanese destroyer Kisaragi, with small caliber bombs delivered from a fighter aircraft.

When all the U.S. aircraft had been destroyed by hostile fire, he organized remaining troops into a beach defense unit which repulsed repeated Japanese attacks. On December 23, 1941, Captain Elrod was mortally wounded while protecting his men who were carrying ammunition to a gun emplacement.

He was posthumously promoted to Major on November 8, 1946, and his widow was presented with the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions during the defense of Wake Island. His widow is also a former commissioned officer in the United States Marine Corps.
... Wikipedia

Nobi has three versions available in his kit of the Grumman F-4F "Wildcat" Paper Model at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-48-grumman-f-4f-wildcat.html
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #14 on: December 12, 2016, 11:09:28 AM »
Dacember 12, 1980 Leicester Codex Sold at Auction



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On this day in 1980, American oil tycoon Armand Hammer pays $5,126,000 at auction for a notebook containing writings by the legendary artist Leonardo da Vinci.

The manuscript, written around 1508, was one of some 30 similar books da Vinci produced during his lifetime on a variety of subjects. It contained 72 loose pages featuring some 300 notes and detailed drawings, all relating to the common theme of water and how it moved. Experts have said that da Vinci drew on it to paint the background of his masterwork, the Mona Lisa. The text, written in brown ink and chalk, read from right to left, an example of da Vinci's favored mirror-writing technique. The painter Giuseppi Ghezzi discovered the notebook in 1690 in a chest of papers belonging to Guglielmo della Porto, a 16th-century Milanese sculptor who had studied Leonardo's work. In 1717, Thomas Coke, the first earl of Leicester, bought the manuscript and installed it among his impressive collection of art at his family estate in England.

More than two centuries later, the notebook--by now known as the Leicester Codex--showed up on the auction block at Christie's in London when the current Lord Coke was forced to sell it to cover inheritance taxes on the estate and art collection. In the days before the sale, art experts and the press speculated that the notebook would go for $7 to $20 million. In fact, the bidding started at $1.4 million and lasted less than two minutes, as Hammer and at least two or three other bidders competed to raise the price $100,000 at a time. The $5.12 million price tag was the highest ever paid for a manuscript at that time; a copy of the legendary Gutenberg Bible had gone for only $2 million in 1978. "I’m very happy with the price. I expected to pay more," Hammer said later. "There is no work of art in the world I wanted more than this." Lord Coke, on the other hand, was only "reasonably happy" with the sale; he claimed the proceeds would not be sufficient to cover the taxes he owed.

Hammer, the president of Occidental Petroleum Corporation, renamed his prize the Hammer Codex and added it to his valuable collection of art. When Hammer died in 1990, he left the notebook and other works to the Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). Several years later, the museum offered the manuscript for sale, claiming it was forced to take this action to cover legal costs incurred when the niece and sole heir of Hammer's late wife, Frances, sued the estate claiming Hammer had cheated Frances out of her rightful share of his fortune. On November 11, 1994, the Hammer Codex was sold to an anonymous bidder--soon identified as Bill Gates, the billionaire founder of Microsoft--at a New York auction for a new record high price of $30.8 million. Gates restored the title of Leicester Codex and has since loaned the manuscript to a number of museums for public display.
... History.com

You can find four models of Leonardo's devices at http://web.archive.org/web/20140201191922/http://www.bbc.co.uk/cbbc/shows/leonardo (if you are in the United Kingdom).
You can find them through the Wayback Machine, if you don't.

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #15 on: December 13, 2016, 10:29:47 AM »
December 13, 1925 Dick Van Dyke Born



You can find the paper toy version of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang at http://www.papertoys.com/chitty.htm#.VIxJKE10yM8
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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #16 on: December 14, 2016, 09:55:29 AM »
December 14, 1988 Vanessa Hudgens Born



Got back late and I've gone down too many rabbit trails, so we are going for the Sucker Punch mech model

You can find it here:  http://rgatt.blogspot.com/2011/04/sucker-punch-mech-gunner-papercraft.html

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #17 on: December 15, 2016, 10:07:52 AM »
December 15, 2001 Leaning Tower of Pisa Reopens



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One of Italy's most famous tourist attractions, the Leaning Tower of Pisa, has reopened for the first time in almost 12 years.
Bells rang out across Pisa to mark the tower's restoration.

One of the first visitors said the experience was "unbelievable". She said that after years of thinking that the tower was going to fall down, "you can't describe the sensation you have when you walk up the steps."

It was closed in 1990 because it was in danger of falling over but after construction work costing millions, tourists can once again enter the 800-year-old tower.

To the naked eye, the 56-metre-high tower looks the same as it always has.

But in fact the lean has been corrected by 45 centimetres.



 The leaning tower, begun more than 800 years ago, developed a tilt almost from the start because it was built on sandy foundations.

 This lean has intrigued generations of admirers of medieval architecture, but in 1990 engineers said the white marble tower was so far out of perpendicular that it risked toppling over.

 The tower was closed and an engineering plan to save it was worked out by an international committee. Work on digging out part of the shifting foundations and placing counterweights ended last summer.

Previously anyone could climb the 284 steps to the top, to admire a fine view over the city of Pisa and its surrounding countryside.

 But now tourists will be limited to guided tours of only 30 people at a time and they will have to book in advance.

 Work on straightening the leaning tower cost $25m, but engineers say it should now survive for another 200 years at least.
  ...BBCNews Europe



Not sure if they worked out the angles enough to say this is pre-1990 or post-2001, but you can get the model at Canon, http://cp.c-ij.com/en/contents/CNT-0011916/index.html
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #18 on: December 16, 2016, 01:15:29 PM »
December 16, 1915 Einstein's General Theory of Relativity Published



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On the recommendation of Italian mathematician Tullio Levi-Civita, Einstein began exploring the usefulness of general covariance (essentially the use of tensors) for his gravitational theory.

For a while Einstein thought that there were problems with the approach, but he later returned to it and, by late 1915, had published his general theory of relativity in the form in which it is used today. This theory explains gravitation as distortion of the structure of spacetime by matter, affecting the inertial motion of other matter. During World War I, the work of Central Powers scientists was available only to Central Powers academics, for national security reasons. Some of Einstein’s work did reach the United Kingdom and the United States through the efforts of the Austrian Paul Ehrenfest and physicists in the Netherlands, especially 1902 Nobel Prize-winner Hendrik Lorentz and Willem de Sitter of Leiden University.

Eleven years after On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies, Einstein published his second groundbreaking work on General Relativity, which continues and expands the original theory. A preeminent feature of General Relativity is its view of gravitation. Einstein held that the forces of acceleration and gravity are equivalent. Again, the single premise that General Relativity is based on is surprisingly simple. It states that all physical laws can be formulated so as to be valid for any observer, regardless of the observer's motion. Consequently, due to the equivalence of acceleration and gravitation, in an accelerated reference frame, observations are equivalent to those in a uniform gravitational field.

This led Einstein to redefine the concept of space itself. In contrast to the Euclidean space in which Newton’s laws apply, he proposed that space itself might be curved. The curvature of space, or better spacetime, is due to massive objects in it, such as the sun, which warp space around their gravitational centre. In such a space, the motion of objects can be described in terms of geometry rather than in terms of external forces.
... World History Project

Hmmm, where was that quantum model?  Since this theory has helped us understand space/time, maybe Dave's Tardis would be a good model.  Or we can use MAK's hako of The Man, http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/vbdownloads.php?do=download&downloadid=59

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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #19 on: December 17, 2016, 11:40:07 AM »
December 17, 1979 Stan Barrett Breaks Sound Barrier ... Maybe



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On December 17, 1979, Hollywood stuntman Stan Barrett blasts across a dry lakebed at California’s Edwards Air Force Base in a rocket- and missile-powered car, becoming the first man to travel faster than the speed of sound on land. He did not set an official record, however. The radar scanner was acting up, and so Barrett’s top speed–739.666 miles per hour by the most reliable measure–was only an estimate. Also, he only drove his rocket car across the lakebed once, not twice as official record guidelines require. And, none of the spectators heard a sonic boom as Barrett zoomed across the course.

Barrett was a 36-year-old stuntman and ex-lightweight Golden Glove champ who had been introduced to auto racing by Paul Newman in 1971. (He was the actor’s stunt double for the film “Sometimes a Great Notion.”) Barrett’s car, the $800,000 Budweiser Rocket, was owned by the movie director Hal Needham, a former racer himself who had broken a nine-year-old world land-speed record on the Bonneville Salt Flats the previous September. The car had a 48,000-horsepower rocket engine and, to give it a little extra kick, a 12,000-horsepower Sidewinder missile.

December 17 was a dry day with temperatures hovering around 20 degrees Fahrenheit. In order to break the sound barrier under those conditions, Barrett had to go faster than 731.9 miles per hour. He started the rocket engine and stepped on the gas; then, after counting to 12, he pushed a button on his steering wheel to fire the Sidewinder so he could go even faster. After he zoomed past a battery of timing devices, Barrett deployed a parachute to help him slow down. In all, it took only a handful of seconds for Barrett to blast across the 5 3/4-mile lakebed.

Unfortunately, the radar speedometers on the ground malfunctioned: Instead of the Rocket’s speed, they measured the speed of a passing truck (38 miles per hour). The final speed estimate came from data by the Air Force, whose scanners seemed to indicate that the Rocket had “probably exceeded the speed of sound.”

Controversy over how fast Barrett actually went persists to this day. It took until October 1997 for another driver, in a British car called the Thrust SSC, to officially break the Mach 1 sound barrier.
... History.com

Of course you can find Dave's Bud Rocket Car at http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/racerz.html#SPEEDERZ

Maybe I should do a mod of the Bud Holiday Truck to be a Bud Racing truck.  I still have to get back and do the Clydesdale version, first
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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #20 on: December 18, 2016, 11:45:01 AM »
December 18 1936 - Su-Lin, the first giant panda to come to the U.S. from China
...arrived in San Francisco, CA. The bear was sold to the Brookfield Zoo for $8,750.
Su-Lin died after only two years in captivity and her body is stuffed and on display
at the Field Museum in Chicago.  Way to go humans!



Su-Lin was captured from the wild...nobody seems to care what happened to its Mother.

Isn't it nicer to have a paper one?
Model link (Canon Papercraft):
http://cp.c-ij.com/en/contents/CNT-0011481/index.html
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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #21 on: December 19, 2016, 12:25:43 PM »
December 19, 1972 Splashdown of Last Apollo Mission



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At 2:25 p.m. EST—12 days, 13 hours, 51 minutes, 59 seconds after departing the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Florida—the Apollo 17 command module America (CM-112) returned to Earth, splashing down in the South Pacific Ocean, approximately 350 miles (563 kilometers) southeast of Samoa. The three 83 foot, 6 inch diameter (25.451 meters) ring sail main parachutes had deployed at an altitude of 10,500 feet (3,200 meters) and slowed the capsule to 22 miles per hour (35.4 kilometers per hour) before it hit the ocean’s surface.

The landing had a high degree of accuracy, coming within 4.0 miles (6.44 kilometers) of the recovery ship, the aircraft carrier USS Ticonderoga (CVS-14).

The flight crew was picked up by a Sikorsky SH-3G Sea King helicopter, Bu. No. 149930, of HC-1, and transported to Ticonderoga. The three astronauts, Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald A. Evans and Harrison H. Schmitt, stepped aboard the aircraft carrier 52 minutes after splashdown.

The splashdown of Apollo 17 brought to an end the era of manned exploration of the Moon which had begun just 3 years, 3 days, 5 hours, 52 minutes, 59 seconds earlier with the launch of Apollo 11.

Just 12 men have set foot on the Moon. In 42 years, no human has returned.
... This Day in Aviation

You can find many Apollo-related models at http://jleslie48.com/gallery_models_real.html
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet