Author Topic: December (2016)  (Read 1503 times)

Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #22 on: December 20, 2016, 12:47:43 PM »
December 20, 1943 Medal of Honor



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MEDAL OF HONOR

VOSLER, FORREST L.

(Air Mission)

Rank and organization: Technical Sergeant, U.S. Army Air Corps. 358th Bomber Squadron, 303d Bomber Group.

Place and date: Over Bremen, Germany, December 20, 1943.

Entered service at: Rochester, New York. Born: July 29, 1923, Lyndonville, New York.

G.O. No.: 73, September 6, 1944.

Citation:

Forest Volser was the radio operator on the Boeing B-17F-65-BO Flying Fortress, 42-29664, the “Jersey Bounce Jr.” (U.S. Air Force)

For conspicuous gallantry in action against the enemy above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a radio operator-air gunner on a heavy bombardment aircraft in a mission over Bremen, Germany, on 20 December 1943. After bombing the target, the aircraft in which T/Sgt. Vosler was serving was severely damaged by antiaircraft fire, forced out of formation, and immediately subjected to repeated vicious attacks by enemy fighters. Early in the engagement a 20-mm. cannon shell exploded in the radio compartment, painfully wounding T/Sgt. Vosler in the legs and thighs. At about the same time a direct hit on the tail of the ship seriously wounded the tail gunner and rendered the tail guns inoperative. Realizing the great need for firepower in protecting the vulnerable tail of the ship, T/Sgt. Vosler, with grim determination, kept up a steady stream of deadly fire. Shortly thereafter another 20-mm. enemy shell exploded, wounding T/Sgt. Vosler in the chest and about the face. Pieces of metal lodged in both eyes, impairing his vision to such an extent that he could only distinguish blurred shapes. Displaying remarkable tenacity and courage, he kept firing his guns and declined to take first-aid treatment. The radio equipment had been rendered inoperative during the battle, and when the pilot announced that he would have to ditch, although unable to see and working entirely by touch, T/Sgt. Vosler finally got the set operating and sent out distress signals despite several lapses into unconsciousness. When the ship ditched, T/Sgt. Vosler managed to get out on the wing by himself and hold the wounded tail gunner from slipping off until the other crewmembers could help them into the dinghy. T/Sgt. Vosler’s actions on this occasion were an inspiration to all serving with him. The extraordinary courage, coolness, and skill he displayed in the face of great odds, when handicapped by injuries that would have incapacitated the average crew member, were outstanding.
... This Day in Aviation

You can grab your own B-17 from Fiddlers Green, http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/Aircraft/Boeing-B17.html
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #23 on: December 21, 2016, 11:37:44 AM »
December 21, 1967 "The Graduate' Opens



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On this day in 1967, the film "The Graduate" opens at two theaters in New York: the Coronet on Third Avenue and the Lincoln Art Theater on Broadway. The film, based on a 1963 novel by Charles Webb, had a simple premise: As its screenwriter explained it, "this kid graduates college, has an affair with his parents' best friend, and then falls in love with the friend's daughter." (It was, he added, "the best pitch I ever heard.") In other words, "The Graduate" was an uneasy exploration of what it meant to be young and adrift at a time of extraordinary confusion and upheaval. The film was a hit: The New Yorker called it "the biggest success in the history of movies," while The Saturday Review said it was "not merely a success; it has become a phenomenon." It earned $35 million in the first six months it was onscreen (by contrast, it cost just $3 million to make) and became the highest-grossing movie of 1968.

"The Graduate" made household names out of many of its stars. Though the young stage actor Dustin Hoffman had never been in a movie before, he rocketed to stardom thanks to his brilliant portrayal of the film's protagonist, the aimless Benjamin Braddock. At the same time, a marginally famous folk-pop duo called Simon & Garfunkel sold millions of records as a result of the film, which made their songs a part of its narrative in complex and sophisticated ways. (Some of those songs had already been released; others, like the movie's title tune, were brand-new.) In June 1968, the single "Mrs. Robinson" hit No. 1 on the pop chart, and that year the film's soundtrack album won a Grammy.

The movie also made a star out of Benjamin Braddock's graduation present: a bright-red Alfa Romeo Duetto Spider. Alfa Romeo had been making racecars for decades—even Enzo Ferrari drove an Alfa before he began building his own racers—but had never sold very many in the United States. (American customers preferred larger cars, and when they did buy smaller sports cars they tended to buy them from British manufacturers like MG and Triumph.) But the 1967 Duetto Spider, a two-seat convertible roadster, was a real beauty: It had a sharp nose and a rounded, tapered rear end, glass-covered headlights, and what designers called a "classic scallop" running down the side. It handled well, could go from 0 to 60 miles per hour in about 10 seconds, and got 23 miles per gallon of gas.

Though the Duetto Spider was a great car and a pop-culture icon, Americans still weren't interested in buying it. The model—with new names like the Spider Veloce, the Quadrifoglio and even the Graduate—stayed on the market until 1994, without much sales success. In 2007, the company's CEO announced that he might reintroduce the Duetto for Alfa Romeo's 100th anniversary in 2010.
... History.com

Last summer, I was going through a couple link sites, trying to flesh out my collections of car models.  There were several manufacturers that had very few models in my archives, including Alfa.  Thanks to Wayback Machine, you can have your own Red Duetto :  http://web.archive.org/web/20070309212839/http://members.at.infoseek.co.jp/papermodels/duetto/duetto.htm
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #24 on: December 22, 2016, 01:42:52 PM »
December 22, 1964 SR-71 First Flight



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Lockheed test pilot Robert J. “Bob” Gilliland made a solo first flight of the first SR-71A, 61-7950, at Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, California. The “Blackbird” flew higher than 45,000 feet (13,716 meters) and more than 1,000 miles per hour (1,609 kilometers per hour) before landing at Edwards Air Force Base, 22 Miles (35 kilometers) northeast, to begin the flight test program.

Bob Gilliland made the first flight of every Lockheed SR-71 as they were produced. It is reported that he has logged more flight time in excess of Mach 3 than any other pilot.
...This Day in Aviation

For the model, I'll point you to Ken West's model, https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-32-lockheed-sr-71-blackbird-paper-model.html.  Don't forget Dave's accessory kit when you get it.
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #25 on: December 23, 2016, 08:48:44 AM »
December 23, 1888 Van Gogh Chops Off Ear

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On this day in 1888, Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh, suffering from severe depression, cuts off the lower part of his left ear with a razor while staying in Arles, France.He later documented the event in a painting titled Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear. Today, Van Gogh is regarded as an artistic genius and his masterpieces sell for record-breaking prices; however, during his lifetime, he was a poster boy for tortured starving artists and sold only one painting.

Vincent Willem van Gogh was born on March 30, 1853, in the Netherlands. He had a difficult, nervous personality and worked unsuccessfully at an art gallery and then as a preacher among poor miners in Belgium. In 1880, he decided to become an artist. His work from this period–the most famous of which is The Potato Eaters (1885)–is dark and somber and reflective of the experiences he had among peasants and impoverished miners.

In 1886, Van Gogh moved to Paris where his younger brother Theo, with whom he was close, lived. Theo, an art dealer, supported his brother financially and introduced him to a number of artists, including Paul Gauguin, Camille Pisarro and Georges Seurat. Influenced by these and other painters, Van Gogh’s own artistic style lightened up and he began using more color.

In 1888, Van Gogh rented a house in Arles in the south of France, where he hoped to found an artists’ colony and be less of a burden to his brother. In Arles, Van Gogh painted vivid scenes from the countryside as well as still-lifes, including his famous sunflower series. Gauguin came to stay with him in Arles and the two men worked together for almost two months. However, tensions developed and on December 23, in a fit of dementia, Van Gogh threatened his friend with a knife before turning it on himself and mutilating his ear lobe. Afterward, he allegedly wrapped up the ear and gave it to a prostitute at a nearby brothel. Following that incident, Van Gogh was hospitalized in Arles and then checked himself into a mental institution in Saint-Remy for a year. During his stay in Saint-Remy, he fluctuated between periods of madness and intense creativity, in which he produced some of his best and most well-known works, including Starry Night and Irises.

In May 1890, Van Gogh moved to Auvers-sur-Oise, near Paris, where he continued to be plagued by despair and loneliness. On July 27, 1890, he shot himself and died two days later at age 37.
...History.com

For the model, I'm going with Mauther's Van Gogh Pop-Up Room, http://papermau.blogspot.com.br/2014/11/van-gogh-pop-up-room-paper-model-by.html

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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #26 on: December 23, 2016, 02:29:52 PM »
December 24, 1801 Richard Trevithick's Puffing Devil



... History.com

I think I've seen a model of the 1804, but can't find it now


I thought about doing a simplified model of the London Coach once
[imghttp://www.3wheelers.com/threthewick1.jpg][/img]

So, this is pretty much a call for help.  Does anyone know of a Trevithick model?
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #27 on: December 23, 2016, 02:51:44 PM »
Oh, what the heck, let's do the 25th, too.

December 25, 1984 Georgia Elizabeth Tennant, nee Moffett, Born



What with the Doctor Who Marathon going on, I was reminded of this.  Of course, she is the daughter of Peter Davidson, the Fifth Doctor, met her future husband, David Tennant, the Tenth Doctor, while playing his daughter.  Was there an 'Olive' in Doctor Who?  The reason I ask is that her first son was born before meeting David.  David and Georgia's first child is named Olive.  The next child is Wilfred (I hesitate to ask if his middle name is Mott) and their most recent daughter is Doris (possibly Doris Lethbridge-Stewart ?) But I don't remember an Olive in the Doctor Who story line.

For the model, let's go with Dave's (Winfield, not Tennant) Tardis, http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/specialz.html
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #28 on: December 28, 2016, 01:58:05 PM »
Well, since I always have a Holiday Break, I thought this year might be the year to have a post for each day.  Oops

December 26, 1956  Preston Tucker Dies



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On December 26, 1956, the visionary carmaker Preston Tucker dies of lung cancer. He was just 53 years old.

Tucker began his career in the auto industry as a mail messenger at General Motors. He quickly worked his way out of the mailroom, however, and before he turned 30 he was the vice president of a Packard dealership in Indianapolis. There, he befriended racecar designer Henry Miller, and the two men chatted often about how to build a truly great automobile. They teamed up to build racecars for Ford in the 1930s, but when the United States entered World War II, Tucker turned his attention to the war effort. He invented and manufactured a gun turret for Navy ships.

As soon as the war ended, however, Tucker was ready to start production on his own line of cars–cars that, unlike the recycled 1942 models that most car companies were turning out, were entirely new. With their low-slung, aerodynamic teardrop shape, Tucker cars looked like nothing anyone had ever seen. (“It looks,” wrote one reporter, “like it’s doing 90 even when it’s standing still.”) They drove that way, too: Their rear-mounted engines were modified helicopter engines, and they had disc brakes, fuel injection, specialized transmissions, and a third “Cyclops” headlight that was connected to the steering wheel and swiveled with the car’s wheels. Ahead-of-their-time safety features abounded: padded dashboards, “pop-out” safety glass windshields and a reinforced carbon frame. (The car was even supposed to have seatbelts, until one of Tucker’s assistants convinced him that they would make the car seem less sturdy and less safe than it was.)

To build this amazing “Tucker Torpedo,” the carmaker leased an old Dodge plant near Chicago from the federal War Assets Administration, which had been building B-29 bombers there. While they waited for the WAA to clear out, Tucker and his team hand-built 50 prototype cars by hand. (The first one, called the “Tin Goose,” was hammered out of sheet steel because engineers could not find enough clay for a full-scale mockup.) Meanwhile, because the company was almost completely broke, they solicited investors any way they could. First, they sold dealer franchises; then they sold stock to the public; then they began to sell car accessories like radios and seat covers, all before the Torpedo had hit the assembly line.

This was apparently the last straw for the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission, which launched an investigation in May 1948. The federal government’s argument was that Tucker never planned to build any cars–according to this line of reasoning, he was just going to bilk his investors and go out of business. As this was patently not the case, prosecutors struggled to convince the jury; in fact, the accusations were so specious that Tucker’s attorney did not even bother to mount a defense. Tucker was acquitted in January 1950, but the damage was already done: Tucker lost all his investors, had to fire all of his workers, and never built another Torpedo.

In 1988, director Francis Ford Coppola made a biographical movie called “Tucker: The Man and His Dream.” It received a good deal of critical praise, but–perhaps like Tucker’s cars–never really found its audience, and the studio ended up losing money on the film.
... History.com

For the Tucker Torpedo, go to http://hiperfanauto.blogspot.com.br/2013/04/paper-model-modelismo-em-papel.html
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #29 on: December 28, 2016, 02:09:00 PM »
December 27, 1900 Carrie A. Nation Smashes Bar



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Prohibitionist Carry Nation smashes up the bar at the Carey Hotel in Wichita, Kansas, causing several thousand dollars in damage and landing in jail. Nation, who was released shortly after the incident, became famous for carrying a hatchet and wrecking saloons as part of her anti-alcohol crusade.


Carry Amelia Moore was born in Kentucky in 1846. As a young woman, she married Charles Gloyd, whose hard-drinking soon killed him and left Nation alone to support their young child. The experience instilled in Nation a lifelong distaste for alcohol. She later married David Nation, who worked as a preacher and lawyer, and they eventually settled in Kansas. There, she was involved with the Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU). The WCTU was founded in 1874 by women “concerned about the problems alcohol was causing their families and society.” At the time, women lacked many of the same rights as men and their lives could be ruined if their husbands drank too much. In addition to alcohol prohibition, over the years the WCTU lobbied for a long list of social reforms, including women’s suffrage and the fight against tobacco and other drugs.


In 1880, Kansas became the first state to adopt a constitutional provision banning the manufacture and sale of alcohol. However, prohibition was enforced unevenly and with many saloon owners ignoring the ban completely, Nation came to believe she needed to abandon the nonviolent methods of the WCTU in order to make an impact. After the incident at the Carey Hotel, her fame increased as she continued her saloon-smashing campaign in other locations and traveled extensively to speak out in favor of temperance. She sold souvenir hatchets to help fund her activities and used the name Carry A. Nation. Some people viewed her as crusader, while others saw her as a crank.


Nation died in 1911, never living to see nationwide prohibition in America, which was established with the 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution and went into effect on January 16, 1920. Prohibition, considered a failure, was repealed on December 5, 1933, by the 21st Amendment.
...History.com

For the model, let's use Mauther's Red Dog Saloon, http://papermau.blogspot.com.br/2012/11/toys-in-attic-by-papermau-red-dog.html
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #30 on: December 28, 2016, 03:12:20 PM »
December28, 1922 Stan Lee Born



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Stan Lee (born Stanley Martin Lieber, December 28, 1922) is an American comic-book writer, editor, publisher, media producer, television host, actor, and former president and chairman of Marvel Comics. In collaboration with several artists, including Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, he created Spider-Man, the Hulk, Doctor Strange, the Fantastic Four, Iron Man, Daredevil, Thor, the X-Men, and many other fictional characters, introducing a thoroughly shared universe into superhero comic books. In addition, he challenged the comics' industry's censorship organization, the Comics Code Authority, forcing it to reform its policies. Lee subsequently led the expansion of Marvel Comics from a small division of a publishing house to a large multimedia corporation.

He was inducted into the comic book industry's Will Eisner Award Hall of Fame in 1994 and the Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1995. Lee received a National Medal of Arts in 2008.
... Wikipedia

OMG!  All the stuff he's done, and still working.

For the model, I decided to just post a 'Marvel' search on Mauther's blog.  I bet this list could keep a person busy all year, probably longer
http://papermau.blogspot.com/search?q=marvel
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #31 on: December 29, 2016, 10:32:28 AM »
December 29, 1935 Antoine de Saint Exupéry Crashes in the Sahara



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Early in the morning, Antoine Marie Jean-Baptiste Roger comte de Saint Exupéry took off from Aéroport de Paris – Le Bourget  enroute to Saïgon, Cochin-China, as a participant in the long distance Paris-to-Saïgon “raid,” or air race. The race was sponsored by the Aéro-Club de France, which had offered a prize of ₣1,200,000 (franc français), approximately £16,000 or $70,000, to the winner, providing the finishing time was less than 90 hours. The distance was estimated at 13,800 miles (22,209 kilometers). Any airplane type could be entered in the race as long as it had an official airworthiness certificate and a flight crew of two, or a single pilot with an autopilot.

Antoine de Saint Exupéry was accompanied by  André Prévot as the navigator and flight engineer. The airplane was a red and white Caudron C.630 Simoun, c/n 7042.20, which was registered to Saint Exupéry on  9 April 1935 and given civil registration F-ANRY, a representation of his name (“ANtoine de Saint ExupéRY”). He had flown the Simoun 8,000 miles (12,875 kilometers) in the eight months he had owned it, “. . .and her engine had not skipped a beat; not a bolt in her had loosened.”

After taking off at Paris, Saint Exupéry followed the Seine to the valley of the Loire and continued south, crossing the southern coast of France near Marseilles. The fliers had been over the Mediterranean Sea for a short while when they saw fuel leaking from the left wing. Prévot calculated that they had lost 20 gallons (76 liters) of fuel. The turned back and landed at Marignane to repair the leak and refuel before continuing.  Saint Exupéry wrote, “I drank a cup of coffee while the time lost hurt like an open wound.”

Once again heading across the Mediterranean toward Tunis, they encountered low clouds and heavy rain which forced them down to just 60 feet (18 meters) over the water. They flew along the coast of Sardinia as the weather improved.

F-ANRY crossed the coast of Africa at Bizerte, Tunisia, and about fifteen minutes later landed to refuel. With two hours of daylight remaining, Saint Exupéry and Prévot took off again, now heading toward Benghazi, Libya. They landed there at 11:00 p.m., local time, and in just twenty minutes the airplane had been refueled and once more, they were airborne.

Flying east after moonset, Saint Exupéry and Prévot were in total darkness. After three hours a faint glow of his navigation lights on the airplane’s wingtips told Saint Exupéry that he had flown into clouds, with visibility measured in just feet.

At a time when there were no navigation aids, pilots had to navigate by their compass, airspeed indicator and clock. Though Saint Exupéry had met with meteorologists to plan his flight, there was no way to update the weather information after takeoff. He had no way of knowing whether an expected tailwind had held, or if it had changed, was his speed across the ground faster or slower than planned? Had the wind blown him right or left of course? Had the atmospheric pressure changed, causing his altimeter to read higher or lower than the airplane actually was? Flying across the emptiness of the  Sahara Desert with no landmarks, in total darkness and now just a few feet of visibility, he and Prévot could only guess at their position.

4 hours, 15 minutes after taking off from Benghazi, the C.630 crashed into gently rising terrain at 170 miles per hour (274 kilometers per hour).

The airplane had slid 250 yards across the surface of the plateau and was heavily damaged, but Saint Exupéry and Prévot were unhurt. However, their water was lost. They were left with “. . . a pint of coffee in a battered thermos flask and half a pint of white wine. . . There were some grapes, too, and a single orange.”

Without food or water, Antoine de Saint Exupéry and Andre Prévot wandered across the desert searching for help. The followed mirages, and frequently recrossed their own tracks. They always returned to the wreck of the Simoun. They experienced delusions.

After four days, they were rescued by Bedouin tribesmen.

The location of the crash is uncertain, but is believed to be near Wadi el Natrun in Egypt, west of the Nile delta.

Saint Exupéry wrote about the experience in Wind, Sand and Stars, published in 1939. It was the basis for his famous novella, The Little Prince.
... This Day in Aviation

You can grab your Petit Prince paper toy at http://www.lepetitprince.com/paper-toy/
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2016)
« Reply #32 on: December 30, 2016, 10:24:54 AM »
December 30, 1816 Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin wed

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On this day, Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin wed. The pair had run away together in July 1814, but because Shelley was already married they were unable to marry for two years, until the death of Shelley's wife.

Shelley, the heir to his wealthy grandfather's estate, was expelled from Oxford when he refused to acknowledge authorship of a controversial essay. He eloped with his first wife, Harriet Westbrook, the daughter of a tavern owner, in 1811. However, just a few years later Shelley fell in love with the young Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, daughter of a prominent reformer and an early feminist writer. Shelley and Godwin fled to Europe and married in 1816.

Shelley's inheritance did not pay all the bills, and the couple spent much of their married life abroad, fleeing Shelley's creditors. While living in Geneva, the Shelleys and their dear friend Lord Byron challenged each other to write a compelling ghost story. Only Mary Shelley finished hers and later published the story as Frankenstein.

The Shelleys had five children, but only one lived to adulthood. After Shelley drowned in a sailing accident when Mary was only 24, she edited two volumes of his works. She lived on a small stipend from her father-in-law, Lord Shelley, until her surviving son inherited his fortune and title in 1844. She died at the age of 53. Although she was a respected writer for many years, only Frankenstein and her journals are still widely read.
... History.com

'Two vast and trunkless legs of stone...'  It's a shame that there is no Ozymandius paper models, so we will go with the vast and fertile territory of Frankenstein.



You can find this Frankenstein at http://bobcanada92.blogspot.com/2010/08/frankenstein-010-frankenstein.html

I wish the 100 Frankensteins Project was still going.  It was rather entertaining, http://bobcanada92.blogspot.com/search/label/100%20frankensteins%20project

It is an interesting blog for the most part, the latest posting is on movies from 1986, http://bobcanada92.blogspot.com/2016/12/1986-another-great-year-for-blockbusters.html
There are no strangers in this world ...
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