Author Topic: January (2017)  (Read 1976 times)

Vermin King

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Re: January (2017)
« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2017, 11:45:12 AM »
January 9, 1965 Goldfinger



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On this day in 1965, the James Bond movie “Goldfinger,” which features the suave British super-spy driving an Aston Martin Silver Birch DB5 sports car, opens in theaters across the U.S. Aston Martins would go on to appear in a number of other Bond films.

Aston Martin’s roots date back to 1913, when Robert Bamford and Lionel Martin formed a company in London to sell Singer cars. The following year, the men changed the name of their business to Aston Martin (in honor of Lionel Martin’s successful performances at hill climb races at Aston Clinton in Buckinghamshire, England) and eventually began producing their own high-quality sports cars. By the 1920s, Aston Martin cars were racing in international competitions, including the French Grand Prix and the 24 Hours of Le Mans. In 1947, British industrialist David Brown bought Aston Martin and the next year launched the DB1 (the name comes from his initials). In 1959, an Aston Martin DBR1 took first place at the 24 Hours of Le Mans; the company also won the World Sports Car Championship that year. (Afterward, the company took a lengthy hiatus from racing, returning again in 2004.

In 1987, Ford Motor Company took a 75 percent stake in Aston Martin, which by then had gone through several owners; Ford assumed full ownership in 1994. In 2007, Ford sold Aston Martin to a group of investors for a reported $925 million. At the time, Aston Martin made around 5,000 cars per year, each carrying a price tag of more than $100,000.

The DB5 went into production in 1963 and the elegant coupe was featured in “Goldfinger,” which debuted in Great Britain in 1964. The DB5 also appeared in such movies as “Thunderball” and “GoldenEye.” “Die Another Day,” which premiered in 2002 and starred Pierce Brosnan, featured an Aston Martin V12 Vanquish. In 2006, “Casino Royale,” starring Daniel Craig, featured an Aston Martin DBS.

James Bond was the creation of British author Ian Fleming (1908-1964), whose first Bond book, “Casino Royale,” was published in 1953. Fleming, who came from a well-to-do family in London, worked as a foreign correspondent, stockbroker and personal assistant to Britain’s director of naval intelligence during World War II, experiences that would provide fodder for his best-selling Bond books. The first Bond film, “Dr. No,” was released in 1962 and starred Sean Connery, who also played Bond in “Goldfinger” (as well as five other movies). Since that time, five more actors–George Lazenby, Roger Moore, Timothy Dalton, Pierce Brosnan and Daniel Craig–have portrayed the world’s most famous fictional spy in what has become one of the most lucrative movie franchises in history. Fast cars and high-tech gadgetry have played a central role in all Bond films.
...History.com

They didn't mention Craig's Bond having the DB5 in storage...

Triple M's model is about as good as we can do on this, http://www.minimodel.cz/tm41-aston-martin-db-5.html

The more I look at this model, the more I realize how close it could be to a good model.  Fixing the hood and grill as a separate part would really help.  I might just build it and come up with a better hood/grill to glue on top.  hmmm
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Vermin King

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Re: January (2017)
« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2017, 11:34:48 AM »
January 10, 1964 B-52H Turbulence Test



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This Boeing B-52H Stratofortress, serial number 61-023, flown by Boeing test pilot Charles F. (“Chuck”) Fisher, was conducting structural testing in turbulence near East Spanish Peak, Colorado. The other crew members were pilots Richard V. Curry and Leo Coer, and navigator James Pittman. Dick Curry was flying the airplane and Chuck Fisher, the aircraft commander was in the co-pilot’s position. Pittman was on the lower deck.

The Boeing B-52 Stratofortress had been designed as a very high altitude penetration bomber, but changes in Soviet defensive systems led to a change to very low altitude flight as a means of evading radar. This was subjecting the airframes to unexpected stresses. “Ten-Twenty-Three” (its serial number was 61-023, shortened on the vertical fin to “1023”) had been returned to Boeing Wichita by the Air Force to be instrumented to investigate the effects of high-speed, low-altitude flight on the 245-ton bomber.

Flying at 14,300 feet (4,359 meters) and 345 knots (397 miles per hour, 639 kilometers per hour), indicated air speed, the airplane encountered severe clear air turbulence and lost the vertical stabilizer. Several B-52s had been lost under similar circumstances. (Another, a B-52D, was lost just three days later at Savage Mountain, Maryland.)

Chuck Fisher immediately took control of the B-52. He later reported, “As the encounter progressed, a very sharp- edged blow which was followed by many more. We developed an almost instantaneous rate of roll at fairly high rate. The roll was to the far left and the nose was swinging up and to the right at a rapid rate. During the second portion of the encounter, the airplane motions actually seemed to be negating my control inputs. I had the rudder to the firewall, the column in my lap, and full wheel, and I wasn’t having any luck righting the airplane. In the short period after the turbulence I gave the order to prepare to abandon the airplane because I didn’t think we were going to keep it together.”

A Boeing report on the incident, based on installed sensors and instrumentation aboard -023, said that the bomber had  “. . . flown through an area containing the combined effects of a (wind) rotor associated with a mountain wave and lateral shear due to airflow around a mountain peak. . . Gust initially built up from the right to a maximum of about 45 feet per second [13.7 meters per second] (TAS), then reversed to a maximum of 36 feet per second [11 meters per second] from the left, before swinging to a maximum of about 147 feet per second [44.8 meters per second] from the left followed by a return to 31 feet per second [9.5 meters per second].”

Fisher flew the bomber back to Wichita and was met by a F-100 Super Sabre chase plane. When the extent of the damage was seen, the B-52 was diverted due to the gusty winds in Kansas. Six hours after the damage occured, Chuck Fisher safely landed the airplane at Eaker Air Force Base, Blythville, Arkansas. He said it was, “the finest airplane I’ve ever flown.”
... This Day in Aviation



The B-52H is the only version still in service. 102 were built and 76 are still in service after more than 50 years.

You can find Gary Pilsworth's B52H at http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/vbdownloads.php?do=download&downloadid=700
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Vermin King

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Re: January (2017)
« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2017, 11:59:00 AM »
January 11, 1966 "Daktari" African adventure series premieres on CBS TV



Who can forget Clarence the Cross-Eyed Lion and Judy the Chimp, and the Zebra-striped Jeep Pickup.  They also had a lot of Landrovers to tool around in.


Well, it isn't a 1961 Defender or a Jeep pickup, but for the model, I'm going with Dave's Safari Defender, http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/promotional_free_paper_models.html
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Vermin King

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Re: January (2017)
« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2017, 11:56:03 AM »
January 12, 1879  British-Zulu War Begins



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The British-Zulu War begins as British troops under Lieutenant General Frederic Augustus invade Zululand from the southern African republic of Natal.

In 1843, Britain succeeded the Boers as the rulers of Natal, which controlled Zululand, the neighboring kingdom of the Zulu people. Boers, also known as Afrikaners, were the descendants of the original Dutch settlers who came to South Africa in the 17th century. Zulus, a migrant people from the north, also came to southern Africa during the 17th century, settling around the Tugela River region.

In 1838, the Boers, migrating north to elude the new British dominions in the south, first came into armed conflict with the Zulus, who were under the rule of King Dingane at the time. The European migrants succeeded in overthrowing Dingane in 1840, replacing him with his son Mpande, who became a vassal of the new Boer republic of Natal. In 1843, the British took over Natal and Zululand.

In 1872, King Mpande died and was succeeded by his son Cetshwayo, who was determined to resist European domination in his territory. In December 1878, Cetshwayo rejected the British demand that he disband his troops, and in January British forces invaded Zululand to suppress Cetshwayo. The British suffered grave defeats at Isandlwana, where 1,300 British soldiers were killed or wounded, and at Hlobane Mountain, but on March 29 the tide turned in favor of the British at the Battle of Khambula.

At Ulundi in July, Cetshwayo's forces were utterly routed, and the Zulus were forced to surrender to the British. In 1887, faced with continuing Zulu rebellions, the British formally annexed Zululand, and in 1897 it became a part of Natal, which joined the Union of South Africa in 1910.
... History.com

For the model, we'll use Zio's figures at http://web.archive.org/web/20150323091200/http://www.zioprudenzio.it/fok-sold.html
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Vermin King

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Re: January (2017)
« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2017, 01:13:43 PM »
January 13, 1977  Orlando Bloom Born



I thought there was a Legolas 1:6 model at Noturno Sukhoi, but didn't see it at a quick glance, so we'll go with JOssorio's Legolas at http://librosgratispapercraftymas.blogspot.com/2013/03/legolas-lord-of-ring.html

I must admit his thick flats look really good.  I also did some of his ancient coins a while back.
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Dave Winfield

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Re: January (2017)
« Reply #16 on: January 13, 2017, 01:28:43 PM »
Legolas?   Isn't that what you are when you run out of Lego?
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Vermin King

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Re: January (2017)
« Reply #17 on: January 14, 2017, 12:20:54 PM »
January 14, 1924 Guy Williams Born



Okay, I'm one of those guys that hurried home from school to catch Lost in Space.  And there are a number of LIS models out there.

B-9 Robot, http://jleslie48.com/gallery_models_scifi.html#m1
The space pod, http://web.archive.org/web/20120716060709/http://pendercrafts.com/rc.htm
Jupiter 2, http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/specialz.html
Chariot, http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/specialz.html
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Dave Winfield

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Re: January (2017)
« Reply #18 on: January 14, 2017, 09:54:44 PM »
I liked the concept of the original series, even if I didn't care for the series itself.
The cast was my main dislike.

I did enjoy the movie remake...a lot...except for that cgi monkey thing.

A  Lost In Space remake is in the works from Netflix.
Sounds like it might be something akin to the recent Westworld series.
Hopefully a proper adult show.
Netflix does produce some good stuff.

recent article here: https://www.cnet.com/news/parker-posey-cast-in-netflix-lost-in-space-remake/

Not much news about yet, and I have no idea of an actual air date.
But I am looking forward to this.






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Vermin King

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Re: January (2017)
« Reply #19 on: January 15, 2017, 01:36:06 PM »
January 15, 2009 Miracle on the Hudson



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At 3:25 p.m., Eastern Standard Time, U.S. Airways Flight 1549 departed from Runway 4 at LaGuardia International Airport (LGA) enroute to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA) with a stop at Charlotte, North Carolina (CLT). On board were 150 passengers and 5 crewmembers. The pilot-in-command was Captain Chesley Burnett Sullenberger III, and the co-pilot was First Officer Jeffrey B. Skiles.

Flight 1549 (radio call sign, “Cactus Fifteen-Forty-Nine”) was an Airbus Industrie A320-214, with registration N106US.

First Officer Skiles was the pilot flying on the first leg of the flight. The airliner was climbing and gaining airspeed, when at 3:27:11, it collided with a large flock of Canada Geese at an altitude of 2,818 feet (859 meters), approximately 4.5 miles (7.2 kilometers) from the runway. Birds were ingested in both engines which immediately lost thrust. Captain Sullenberger took over the controls while Skiles began the engine restart procedure.

Though air traffic controllers had made runways available at the three closest airports for an emergency landing, Flight 1549 had lost too much airspeed and altitude to reach any of them. Despite the best efforts of Captain Sullenberger and First Officer Skiles to restart the two damaged engines, there was no alternative but to ditch the airliner into the Hudson River.

The A320 hit the water in a slight nose-up attitude at approximately 130 knots (150 miles per hour, 241 kilometers per hour). The airliner quickly slowed then began drifting with the tide. The force of the impact had twisted the airframe and the cargo doors’ seals began to leak. N106US began to settle into the water.

Cabin attendants opened the doors and activated the emergency slides, which acted as flotation rafts. Passengers quickly evacuated the airliner and many of them stood on the wings to stay out of the frigid water.

Before he left his airplane, Captain Sullenberger twice went through the cabin to make sure than no one was left aboard. He was the last person to leave Flight 1549.

Rescue efforts were immediately under way. Everyone on board was saved, and there were just five serious injuries sustained during the emergency.

This accident is known as “The Miracle on the Hudson” and the crew of U.S. Airways Flight 1549 are regarded as national heroes.

This was the most successful ditching on an airliner since Pan American World Airways Flight 6, a Boeing 377 Stratocruiser named Sovereign of the Skies, went down in the Pacific Ocean, 15 October 1956.
... This Day in Aviation

You can find a model of this aircraft in the PM.com downloads, http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/vbdownloads.php?do=download&downloadid=1614

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Vermin King

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Re: January (2017)
« Reply #20 on: January 16, 2017, 10:20:30 AM »
January 16, 1919 Prohibition



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The 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, prohibiting the “manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors for beverage purposes,” is ratified on this day in 1919 and becomes the law of the land.

The movement for the prohibition of alcohol began in the early 19th century, when Americans concerned about the adverse effects of drinking began forming temperance societies. By the late 19th century, these groups had become a powerful political force, campaigning on the state level and calling for total national abstinence. In December 1917, the 18th Amendment, also known as the Prohibition Amendment, was passed by Congress and sent to the states for ratification.

Prohibition took effect in January 1919. Nine months later, Congress passed the Volstead Act, or National Prohibition Act, over President Woodrow Wilson’s veto. The Volstead Act provided for the enforcement of prohibition, including the creation of a special unit of the Treasury Department. Despite a vigorous effort by law-enforcement agencies, the Volstead Act failed to prevent the large-scale distribution of alcoholic beverages, and organized crime flourished in America. In 1933, the 21st Amendment to the Constitution was passed and ratified, repealing prohibition.
...History.com

They didn't mention that bootlegging eventually led to Nascar...

For the model, I'm going with Trent's Tommy Gun, https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-1-1928-thompson-smg-paper-model.html
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Vermin King

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Re: January (2017)
« Reply #21 on: January 17, 2017, 11:12:06 AM »
NBC Television Greenlights The Monkees

On this date, NBC orders 32 episodes of the show.  In its run it actually got two Emmy's.



And, of course, we have to use Dave's model again.



http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/starcarz.html#STARCARZ
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