Author Topic: February (2017)  (Read 1386 times)

Vermin King

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February (2017)
« on: February 01, 2017, 12:32:19 PM »
February 1, 2004 Ford GT First TV Ad



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During the Super Bowl on this day in 2004, the first TV commercial airs for the Ford GT, a new, high-performance “supercar” based on Ford’s GT40 race car, which won the 24 Hours of Le Mans endurance race in France four years in a row starting in 1966. The TV ad for the two-seater Ford GT featured a driver’s eye view of the car noisily zooming around California’s Thunderhill Raceway, and ended with the tag line: “The Pace Car for an Entire Company.”

The history of the GT40 dates back to the early 1960s, when Henry Ford II (1917-1987), head of the Ford Motor Company and grandson of company founder Henry Ford (1863-1947), decided to launch a racing program in order to better promote his company. Ford set his sights on winning the prestigious 24 Hours of Le Mans race, which was dominated in the first half of the 1960s by Italian automaker Ferrari. Endurance racing tested the stamina of both car and driver, and a victory at Le Mans was considered as a testament to a car’s superior engineering. The first Le Mans race was held in 1923; Andre Lagache and Rene Leonard drove 1,373 miles in a Chenard & Walcker auto, for an average speed of 57 mph, to win the event. (Today, along with Le Mans, the 12 Hours of Sebring and the Rolex 24 at Daytona are known as the Triple Crown of endurance racing.)

In pursuit of his goal to win races, Henry Ford II attempted in the early 1960s to acquire Ferrari; however, company founder Enzo Ferrari (1898-1988) abruptly pulled out of the deal. Ford went on to invest millions developing its own racing program instead. In 1964, the Ford GT40 (the initials stood for Gran Turismo or Grand Touring; the number represented the car’s height in inches) participated in pre-race testing at Le Mans with lackluster results. Ford then hired car designer Carroll Shelby (1923-) to run its racing program. Shelby, a former race car driver, who in 1959 became just the second American to win Le Mans, oversaw improvements to the GT40, and in 1966, Ford’s race cars experienced major success, first at Sebring and Daytona, then Le Mans. That year in France, the team of Bruce McLaren and Chris Amon drove a GT40 MkII a distance of some 3,009 miles with an average speed of 125.39 mph to win the race. The following year, a GT40 Mk IV took first place at Le Mans, while a GT40 Mk I won in 1968 and 1969. Rule changes after the 1969 race ended the GT40’s four-year winning streak at Le Mans.

The Ford GT that appeared in the 2004 Super Bowl ad was a bigger version of its 1960s namesake and carried a price tag of around $150,000. Although the Ford GT generated great interest upon its debut, in 2006 the company announced it would discontinue the car, stating it was only intended to be built for two production years. In 2007, Ford shuttered the Wixom, Michigan, plant were the GT was built.
...History.com

Visual Spicer has a great model of this, but if you want a quick one, http://oniya.jp/pepakura/ford.htm#gt40
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Vermin King

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Re: February (2017)
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2017, 01:18:08 PM »
February 2, 1974 First Official Flight YF-16



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Test pilot Philip F. Oestricher made the “official” first flight of the General Dynamics YF-16 Light Weight Fighter prototype, 72-1567, at Edwards Air Force Base, California. During the 90-minute flight the airplane reached 400 knots (740.8 kilometers per hour) and 30,000 feet (9,144 meters).

Built at Fort Worth, Texas, the prototype rolled out 13 December 1973. It was loaded aboard a Lockheed C-5A Galaxy heavy-lift transport and was flown to Edwards. During high-speed taxi tests on 20 January 1974 the YF-16 began to oscillate in the roll axis, threatening to touch the wingtips to the ground. To prevent damage, Phil Oestricher lifted off to regain control and after six minutes, touched down again. The airplane had sustained minor damage and the official first flight was delayed until parts could be produced and installed.

The two YF-16 prototypes competed against the Northrop YF-17 for the role of the Air Force and NATO light weight fighter program. The YF-16 was selected and single-seat F-16A and two-seat F-16B fighters were ordered. The YF-17 was developed into the U.S. Navy’s F/A-18 Hornet.

The F-16 (now, a Lockheed-Martin product) remains in production, with more than 4,500 having been built in the United States and under license in Europe. The United States Air Force has more than 1,200 F-16s in service.
... This Day in Aviation

For a really impressive Stomp Rocket version (24 inches long, with paint scheme by Dave) you can go to https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/f-16-fighting-falcon-2-in-1-stomp-rocket-paper-model.html

For your desk you might try this one:  http://www.tamasoft.co.jp/pepakura/gallery/gallerydetails.php?id=16
Or one of Bruno's at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/catalogsearch/result/index/?p=1&q=f-16
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Vermin King

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Re: February (2017)
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2017, 12:33:51 PM »
February 3, 1946 TWA Inaugurates Non-Stop Service from LA to NY



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Transcontinental and Western Airlines (“The Trans World Airline”) inaugurated non-stop passenger service from Los Angeles to New York with it’s Lockheed L-049 Constellation, Star of California, NC86503.

Captain William John (“Jack”) Frye, president of the airline, and his co-pilot, Captain Lee Flanagin, T&WA’s Western Region Operations Manager, were at the controls with Captain Paul S. Frederickson and Captain A.O. Lundin aboard as relief pilots. Flight Engineers Paul Henry and E.T. Greene completed the flight crew. In the passenger cabin were flight attendants Dorraine Strole and Rita P. Crooks. The 44 passengers were primarily news reporters.

Star of California departed Lockheed Air Terminal, Burbank, California, at 12:59:12 a.m., Pacific Standard Time, and flew across the country at an altitude of 15,000–17,000 feet (4,572–5,182 meters), taking advantage of tailwinds throughout the flight. The Constellation crossed over LaGuardia Airport, New York, at 1,500 feet (457.2 meters) at 11:27 a.m., Eastern Standard Time.

The 2,474-mile (3,954.2 kilometer) Great Circle flight took 7 hours, 27 minutes, 48 seconds, averaging 329 miles per hour (529.5 kilometers per hour), setting a National Aeronautic Association transcontinental speed record for transport aircraft.

With 52 persons aboard, this was the largest number carried in commercial passenger service up to that time.

The four Duplex-Cyclone engines burned 450 gallons (1,703.4 liters) of gasoline per hour. On landing, 610 gallons (2,309.1 liters) of fuel remained.

The Lockheed Constellation first flew in 1942, and was produced for the U.S. Army Air Corps as the C-69. With the end of World War II, commercial airlines needed new airliners for the post-war boom. The Constellation had transoceanic range and a pressurized cabin for passenger comfort.

The Lockheed L-049 Constellation was operated by a flight crew of four and could carry up to 81 passengers. The airplane was 95 feet, 3 inches (29.032 meters) long with a wingspan of 123 feet (37.490 meters) and an overall height of 23 feet, 8 inches (7.214 meters). It had an empty weight of 49,392 pounds (22,403.8 kilograms) and maximum takeoff weight of 86,250 pounds (39,122.3 kilograms).

The L-049 was powered by four 3,347.662-cubic-inch-displacement (54.858 liter) air-cooled, supercharged, fuel-injected, Wright Aeronautical Division Cyclone 18 745C18BA3 (also known as the Duplex-Cyclone) two-row 18-cylinder radial engines with a compression ratio of 6.5:1. They were rated at 2,000 horsepower at 2,400 r.p.m., or 2,200 horsepower at 2,800 r.p.m. for takeoff, (five minute limit) and drove 15 foot, 2 inch (4.623 meter) diameter, three-bladed Hamilton Standard Hydromatic 43E60 constant-speed propellers through a 0.4375:1 gear reduction. The 745C18BA3 was 6 feet, 4.13 inches (1.934 meters) long, 4 feet, 7.78 inches (1.417 meters) in diameter and weighed 2,842 pounds (1,289.11 kilograms).

The L-049 had a cruise speed of 313 miles per hour (503.72 kilometers per hour) and a range of 3,995 miles (6,429.3 kilometers). Its service ceiling was 25,300 feet (7,711 meters).

22 C-69s and 856 Constellations of all types were built. Designed by the famous Kelly Johnson, the Lockheed Constellation was in production from 1943–1958 in both civilian airliner and military transport versions. It is the classic propeller-driven transcontinental and transoceanic airliner.

Jack Frye had founded the Aero Corporation of California, which would later become Transcontinental and Western, on 3 February 1926. He died at Tucson, Arizona on 3 February 1959 at the age of 55 years.
...ThisDayinAviation

For the model, I'm going to go with Bruno's TWA Constellation that you can get at http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/414849-post2037.html

I did that model for a good friend retired from TWA.  Gave it to him on his birthday He was 92 and in hospice.  He died five days later, but the model was his pride and joy, showing it off to everyone.  At his funeral, on the memorial table, the little gem was front and center.  Such a little thing that meant so much to so many.  Makes one humble
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Vermin King

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Re: February (2017)
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2017, 09:11:15 AM »
February 4, 1902 Charles Lindbergh Born



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Charles Augustus Lindbergh, Brigadier General, United States Air Force, Medal of Honor, was born at Detroit, Michigan. Certainly one of the world’s best known pilots, Lindbergh began flight training at the age of 20. In 1924 he was sent to San Antonio, Texas for a year of training at the United States Army flight schools at Brooks and Kelly Fields. He graduated at the top of his class, 5 March 1925, and was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Air Reserve Service. He became an Air Mail pilot and gained valuable flight experience.

On 20 May 1927, Lindbergh departed New York in his custom-built Ryan NYP monoplane, Spirit of St. Louis, and 33 hours, 30 minutes later, he landed at Paris, France, becoming the first person to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. When he returned to the United States, he was presented the Distinguished Flying Cross by President Coolidge. On 14 December 1927, by Act of Congress, Lindbergh was awarded the Medal of Honor: “For displaying heroic courage and skill as a navigator, at the risk of his life, by his nonstop flight in his airplane, the Spirit of St. Louis, from New York City to Paris, France, 20–21 May 1927, by which Capt. Lindbergh not only achieved the greatest individual triumph of any American citizen but demonstrated that travel across the ocean by aircraft was possible.”

In the late 1930s, as a colonel in the Army Air Corps, he had various assignments, including evaluating new aircraft at Wright Field. During World War II, he served as a civilian adviser and flew the Chance-Vought F4U Corsair in combat missions with Marine fighter squadrons VMF-216 and VMF-222. He also flew the Lockheed P-38 Lightning with the Army Air Force 433rd Fighter Squadron.
... This Day in Aviation

Okay, we all know about the Spirit of St. Louis, but I didn't know he got the medal of honor for it, much less the Distinguished Flying Cross.  Nor did I know that he flew Corsairs and a Lightning in WWII.  Since I've posted the Spirit of St. Louis (probably more than once) and I've also posted Corsairs,  I'm going with the Lightning.  I don't believe I have ever posted a link to one and I always thought they had a certain 'cool' factor.

You can get your lightning at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-50-lockheed-p-38j-lightning.html
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Re: February (2017)
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2017, 08:38:05 PM »
February 5, 1940 H.R. Giger Born



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5 February 1940 – 12 May 2014) was a Swiss surrealist painter, sculptor and set designer. He was part of the special effects team that won an Academy Award for Best Achievement in Visual Effects for their design work on the film Alien. He was named to the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2013
... Wikipedia

Frankly, I was not aware of this artist until the movie Alien.  Very interesting art.

For the model, let's go with this guy from Alien



You can find him at http://firefox24680.blogspot.de/2012/03/alien.html
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Re: February (2017)
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2017, 12:44:51 PM »
February 6, 1946 TWA -- La Guardia to Paris



Yeah, I know, same model from a few days back ...

Quote
Transcontinental and Western Airlines—TWA—”The Trans World Airline”, flew its first revenue international passengers on a scheduled transatlantic flight from La Guardia Field, New York, to Aéroport de Paris-Orly, Paris. The airplane was a Lockheed L-049 Constellation, NC86511, named Star of Paris.
... This Day in Aviation

Okay, it's NC86505, not NC86511, but Bruno's little TWA Connie is close.  You can get it at http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/aviation/25109-one-model-per-non-working-day-204.html#post414849
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Re: February (2017)
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2017, 12:36:52 PM »
February 7, 1964  The Beatles Arrive in the U.S.



On February 7, 1964, Pan Am Yankee Clipper flight 101 from London Heathrow lands at New York's Kennedy Airport--and "Beatlemania" arrives. It was the first visit to the United States by the Beatles, a British rock-and-roll quartet that had just scored its first No. 1 U.S. hit six days before with "I Want to Hold Your Hand." At Kennedy, the "Fab Four"--dressed in mod suits and sporting their trademark pudding bowl haircuts--were greeted by 3,000 screaming fans who caused a near riot when the boys stepped off their plane and onto American soil.

Well, I didn't find the Pan Am Yankee Clipper, so you will have to settle for the boys.



You can find them at http://www.paper-replika.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=6614%3Athe-beatles-figurine-paper-craft&catid=39&Itemid=200144&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Paper-replikacomFeedNews+%28Paper-replika.com+Feed+News%29
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Vermin King

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Re: February (2017)
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2017, 11:33:22 AM »
February 8, 1933 First Flight of Boeing 247



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8 February 1933: Boeing test pilot Leslie R. (“Les”) Tower and United Air Lines Captain Louis C. Goldsmith made the first flight of the Boeing Model 247, NX13300, a twin-engine airline transport, at Boeing Field, Seattle, Washington. The first flight lasted 40 minutes and Tower was quite pleased with the airplane. He took it up a second time later in the day.
The 247 is considered to be the first modern airliner because of its all-metal semi-monocoque construction, cantilevered wing and retractable landing gear. It was 50 mph faster than its contemporaries, and could climb on one engine with a full load.
  ... ThisDayinAviation

You can find your own Skymaster at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/catalogsearch/result/?q=%27Boeing+247%27&x=17&y=9
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Vermin King

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Re: February (2017)
« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2017, 10:08:30 AM »
February 9, 1846  Wilhelm Maybach Born



Automotive industry pioneer Wilhelm Maybach, who founded the luxury car brand bearing his name, is born on February 9, 1846, in Heilbronn, Germany.

From the late 19th century Wilhelm Maybach, together with Gottlieb Daimler, developed light, high-speed internal combustion engines suitable for land, water, and air use. These were fitted to the world's first motorcycle, motorboat, and after Daimler's death, to a new automobile introduced in late 1902, the Mercedes model, built to the specifications of Emil Jellinek.

Maybach rose to become technical director of the Daimler Motoren Gesellschaft, or DMG, (and never known by the English name of the quite separate English business, The Daimler Motor Company) but he did not get on well with its chairmen. As a result Maybach left DMG in 1907 to found Maybach-Motorenbau GmbH together with his son Karl in 1909; they manufactured Zeppelin engines. After the signing of the Versailles Treaty in 1919 the company started producing large luxury vehicles, branded as "Maybach".

DaimlerChrysler brought back the brand and one of their concepts, the Maybach Exelero is available from Streetpaper.

You can find it here:  http://www.racepaper.de/street/pkw/maybach.htm

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Vermin King

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Re: February (2017)
« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2017, 01:12:39 PM »
February 10, 1994 First Woman Selected by Air Force to Train as Combat Pilot Completes Training



First Lieutenant Jean Marie (“Jeannie”) Flynn, United States Air Force, the first woman selected by the Air Force for training as a combat pilot, completed six months of training on the McDonnell Douglas F-15E Strike Eagle with the 555th Fighter Wing (“Triple Nickel”) at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. Her call sign is “Tally”.

Another one of those days where you know there is a model, or used to be.  Lots of dead links that Wayback Machine did not help on.  You can find an F-15 at http://www.mod.go.jp/j/kids/equipment/img/index.html

You know, that little 'toy' looks like it would build well.  I'd probably do some Gimp work on it because it looks like there will be some tabs that should be body color, but it doesn't look too bad
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Vermin King

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Re: February (2017)
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2017, 12:22:33 PM »
February 11, 1861 President-elect Lincoln Leaves Springfield for Washington

I really like how History.com has this, so I'm going to pretty much use the whole thing (correcting their spelling)

On this day in 1861, President-elect Abraham Lincoln leaves home in Springfield, Illinois, and embarks on his journey to Washington, D.C.

On a cold, rainy morning, Lincoln boarded a two-car private train loaded with his family's belongings, which he himself had packed and bound. His wife, Mary Todd Lincoln, was in St. Louis on a shopping trip, and joined him later in Indiana. It was a somber occasion. Lincoln was leaving his home and heading into the maw of national crisis. Since he had been elected, seven Southern states had seceded from the Union. Lincoln knew that his actions upon entering office would likely lead to civil war. He spoke to a crowd before departing: "Here I have lived a quarter of a century, and have passed from a young man to an old man. Here my children have been born, and one is buried. I now leave, not knowing when, or whether ever, I may return, with a task before me greater than that which rested upon Washington. Without the assistance of that Divine Being... I cannot succeed. With that assistance, I cannot fail... To His care commending you, as I hope in your prayers you will commend me, I bid you an affectionate farewell."

A bystander reported that the president-elect's "breast heaved with emotion and he could scarcely command his feelings." Indeed, Lincoln's words were prophetic—a funeral train carried him back to Springfield just over four years later.


You can download the station where he boarded, the family home he left, and the Lincoln Tomb at https://www2.illinois.gov/ihpa/Preserve/Pages/construct_mainstreet.aspx




There are no strangers in this world ...
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