Author Topic: March (2017)  (Read 1234 times)

Vermin King

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March (2017)
« on: March 01, 2017, 11:02:04 AM »
March 1, 1925 First Regularly Scheduled Airline Passenger Service



... from the collection of Craig Morris

Quote
Ryan Airlines began the first regularly-scheduled passenger airline service flown within the mainland United States. The airline connected San Diego and Los Angeles, the two largest cities in southern California.

These photographs from the collection of the San Diego Air and Space Museum show opening day activities at Dutch Flats, near the current intersection of Midway Drive and Barnett Avenue, in the city of San Diego.
...This Day in Aviation

Pretty important deal here, but I couldn't even find the name given the aircraft or a model of it.  Any help would be appreciated.

On the other hand, I learned a great deal about T.C. Ryan and his various ventures.  Must have been a very interesting character.

Coincidentally, two years later this story was published in the San Diego Union, March 1, 1927

Quote
The thrilling and fascinating spectacle of a San Diego-built plane, piloted by a famous army and air mail aviator, racing across the Atlantic Ocean . . .  will be witnessed this summer.  A contract for the construction of a monoplane for his proposed New York to Paris non-stop flight was awarded to the Ryan Aircraft Company of this city yesterday by Capt. Charles A. Lindbergh.

So not wanting to leave you without a model, we'll do the Canon Spirit of St. Louis again, http://cp.c-ij.com/jp/contents/CNT-0011915/index.html
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yukonjohn

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2017, 02:52:02 PM »

Quote
Ryan Airlines began the first regularly-scheduled passenger airline service flown within the mainland United States. The airline connected San Diego and Los Angeles, the two largest cities in southern California.

Pretty important deal here, but I couldn't even find the name given the aircraft or a model of it.  Any help would be appreciated.

On the other hand, I learned a great deal about T.C. Ryan and his various ventures.  Must have been a very interesting character.

Coincidentally, two years later this story was published in the San Diego Union, March 1, 1927

Quote
The thrilling and fascinating spectacle of a San Diego-built plane, piloted by a famous army and air mail aviator, racing across the Atlantic Ocean . . .  will be witnessed this summer.  A contract for the construction of a monoplane for his proposed New York to Paris non-stop flight was awarded to the Ryan Aircraft Company of this city yesterday by Capt. Charles A. Lindbergh.

So not wanting to leave you without a model, we'll do the Canon Spirit of St. Louis again, http://cp.c-ij.com/jp/contents/CNT-0011915/index.html

And same answer as last year  ;D ...

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryan_Airline_Company:
... Service was provided by a Standard J-1, a World War I training aircraft (not widely liked by pilots) which they modified with a four-passenger closed cabin in the forward front cockpit area. ...
and a picture of the modified J-1 on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_J

Sure sign of old age, or too much on the mind, when you start repeating questions  ;D

Regards,
John

Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2017, 03:24:11 PM »
Oops.  missed it.  Thank you
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2017, 01:41:02 PM »
March 2, 1969 Concorde First Flight



Quote
At Aéroport de Toulouse – Blagnac, Toulouse, France, the first supersonic airliner prototype, Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde Aircraft 001, registration F-WTSS, made its first flight. On the flight deck were Major André Edouard Turcat, Henri Perrier, Michel Retif and Jacques Guinard. The flight lasted 29 minutes.

During its testing, 001 flew a total of 812 hours, 19 minutes, including 254 hours 49 minutes supersonic.
... This Day in Aviation

You can get your own Concorde at http://www.currell.net/models/concorde.htm
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2017, 12:16:45 PM »
March 3, 1969  Apollo 9 Launched



3 March 1969: At 11:00:00 a.m. Eastern Standard Time (15:00:00 UTC), Apollo 9 Saturn V (SA-504), the second manned Saturn V rocket, is launched from Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. Aboard are astronauts James A. McDivitt, David R. Scott and Russell L. Schweickart. The 10-day Earth orbital mission is used to test docking-undocking with the lunar module, and to certify the LM as flight-worthy. This was necessary before the program could proceed to the next phase: The Moon.

Actually, this is a model of the rocket from the moon-landing mission, but it's close:  http://paper-replika.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=8892:saturn-v-rocket-and-launch-pad-paper-model&catid=139:space&Itemid=206494

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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2017, 11:15:35 AM »
March 4, 1936 Maiden Flight of Hindenburg



Quote
The airship Hindenburg (D–LZ 129) made its first flight at Friedrichshafen, on the north shore of Lake Constance in southern Germany. In command was Dr. Hugo Eckener, chairman of Luftschiffbau Zeppelin GmbH. There were 87 passengers and crew aboard.

The airship was operated by a flight crew of 40, with 12 stewards and cooks. There were 50 passenger sleeping berths in private cabins, with large public areas on the upper, “A” deck, with crew quarters, galley, a public bar and smoking lounge on the lower “B” deck. The ship’s control station was located in a gondola below the forward part of the hull.
... This Day in Aviation

I think we'll use Bryan Tan's model today, http://rocketmantan.deviantart.com/art/LZ-129-Hindenburg-Airship-paper-model-312181994
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2017, 02:09:57 PM »
March 5, 1962 Operation Heat Rise



Quote
Two Convair B-58 Hustler supersonic bombers from the 65th Bombardment Squadron, 43rd Bombardment Wing, Carswell Air Force Base, Texas, took off at sunrise and headed west to Los Angeles, California. Off the Pacific coast they refueled from a Boeing KC-135A Stratotanker, then headed east at maximum speed. They were to enter a radar starting gate at Los Angeles, but the radar did not pick them up so they returned to the tanker, topped off the fuel tanks again, then proceeded east once again. This time their entry was visually confirmed.

Both B-58s had been assigned a block altitude of Flight Level 250 to Flight Level 500 (between 25,000 and 50,000 feet (7,620 to 15,240 meters) by the FAA and all other aircraft were cleared from those altitudes along the course. The flight outbound from Los Angeles was at 50,000 feet (15,240 meters) at speeds above Mach 2.

Under normal conditions, the maximum speed of the B-58 was limited to a skin temperature of 115 °C., to prevent the aluminum honeycomb skin panels from delaminating. For this speed run, Convair engineers had authorized a temperature of 125 °C., which would allow the two bombers to exceed 1,400 miles per hour (2,253 kilometers per hour). Sensors were placed in the skin to monitor the temperature rise (which gave the operation is name: “Heat Rise”).

The first B-58, call sign “Tall Man Five Five,” had a problem with the navigation radar and had some difficulty locating their tanker, but finally were able to. The B-58s descended to 25,000 feet over Kansas for the third refueling and over a 21-minute period, took on 85,000 gallons (321,760 liters) of fuel, climbed back to 45,000 feet (13,716 meters) then continued on to New York.

The Cowtown Hustler crossed the radar gate at New York with an elapsed time of 2:00:58.71 for the West-to-East flight, averaging 1,214.65 miles per hour (1,954.79 kilometers per hour). The second B-58, Tall Man Five Six, was one minute behind.

Passing New York, the two B-58 Hustlers proceeded over the Atlantic Ocean and rendezvoused with tankers for a fourth aerial refueling, then headed back west to Los Angeles. Shortly after passing New York, Tall Man Five Six developed mechanical troubles and had to withdraw from the round-trip record attempt.

Once again over Kansas, Cowtown Hustler refueled for a fourth time then continued back to Los Angeles. The East-to-West leg from New York to Los Angeles was completed in an elapsed time of 2:15:50.08, averaging 1,081.81 miles per hour (1,741.00 kilometers per hour).

The total elapsed time, Los Angeles–New York–Los Angeles, was 4 hours, 41 minutes, 14.98 seconds (4:41:14.98)  for an average speed of 1,044.97 miles per hour (1,681.71 kilometers per hour) The crew and the airplane established three National Aeronautic Association speed records for Speed Over A Recognized Course.

At Los Angeles the crew, Captain Robert G. Sowers, Pilot, Captain Robert MacDonald, Navigator, and Captain John T. Walton, were congratulated by General Thomas S. Power, Chief of Staff, Strategic Air Command, and each airman was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

For the eastbound transcontinental flight, the crew won the Bendix Trophy, and for “the most meritorious flight of the year,” they were also awarded the MacKay Trophy. Their records still stand.

Reportedly, the U.S. Air Force received more than 10,000 damage claims for windows that were broken by the sonic booms created by the two B-58 Hustlers as they flew across the country.

Today, the record-setting, trophy-winning airplane, Convair B-58A-10-CF 59-2458, the Cowtown Hustler, is on display at the National Museum of the United States Air Force, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.
...This Day in Aviation



Not that I'm pushing Dayton, Ohio-related paper models ...

You can get a Convair B-58 Hustler at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-32-b-58-hustler.html
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #7 on: March 06, 2017, 09:14:46 AM »
March 6, 1475 Michelangelo Buonarroti Born



Quote
Michelangelo Buonarroti, the greatest of the Italian Renaissance artists, is born in the small village of Caprese on March 6, 1475. The son of a government administrator, he grew up in Florence, a center of the early Renaissance movement, and became an artist’s apprentice at age 13. Demonstrating obvious talent, he was taken under the wing of Lorenzo de’ Medici, the ruler of the Florentine republic and a great patron of the arts. For two years beginning in 1490, he lived in the Medici palace, where he was a student of the sculptor Bertoldo di Giovanni and studied the Medici art collection, which included ancient Roman statuary.

With the expulsion of the Medici family from Florence in 1494, Michelangelo traveled to Bologna and Rome, where he was commissioned to do several works. His most important early work was the Pieta (1498), a sculpture based on a traditional type of devotional image that showed the body of Christ in the lap of the Virgin Mary. Demonstrating masterful technical skill, he extracted the two perfectly balanced figures of the Pieta from a single block of marble.

With the success of the Pieta, the artist was commissioned to sculpt a monumental statue of the biblical character David for the Florence cathedral. The 17-foot statue, produced in the classical style, demonstrates the artist’s exhaustive knowledge of human anatomy and form. In the work, David is shown watching the approach of his foe Goliath, with every muscle tensed and a pose suggesting impending movement. Upon the completion of David in 1504, Michelangelo’s reputation was firmly established.

That year, he agreed to paint a mural for the Florence city hall to rest alongside one being painted by Leonardo da Vinci, another leading Renaissance artist and an influence on Michelangelo. These murals, which depicted military scenes, have not survived. In 1505, he began work on a planned group of 12 marble apostles for the Florence cathedral but abandoned the project when he was commissioned to design and sculpt a massive tomb for Pope Julius II in Saint Peter’s Basilica in Rome. There were to have been 40 sculptures made for the tomb, but the pope soon ran out of funds for the project, and Michelangelo left Rome.

In 1508, he was called back to Rome to paint the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel–the chief consecrated space in the Vatican. Michelangelo’s epic ceiling frescoes, which took several years to complete, are among his most memorable works. Central in a complex system of decoration featuring numerous figures are nine panels devoted to biblical world history. The most famous of these is The Creation of Adam, a painting in which the arms of God and Adam are outstretched toward each other.

In 1512, Michelangelo completed the Sistine Chapel ceiling and returned to his work on Pope Julius II’s tomb. He eventually completed a total of just three statues for the tomb, which was eventually placed in the church of San Pietro in Vincoli. The most notable of the three is Moses (1513-15), a majestic statue made from a block of marble regarded as unmalleable by other sculptors. In Moses, as in David, Michelangelo infused the stone with a powerful sense of tension and movement.

Having revolutionized European sculpture and painting, Michelangelo turned to architecture in the latter half of his life. His first major architectural achievement was the Medici chapel in the Church of San Lorenzo in Florence, built to house the tombs of the two young Medici family heirs who had recently died. The chapel, which he worked on until 1534, featured many innovative architectural forms based on classical models. The Laurentian Library, which he built as an annex to the same church, is notable for its stair-hall, known as the ricetto, which is regarded as the first instance of mannerism as an architectural style. Mannerism, a successor to the Renaissance artistic movement, subverted harmonious classical forms in favor of expressiveness.

In 1534, Michelangelo left Florence for the last time and traveled to Rome, where he would work and live for the rest of his life. That year saw his painting of the The Last Judgment on a wall above the altar in the Sistine Chapel for Pope Paul III. The massive painting depicts Christ’s damnation of sinners and blessing of the virtuous, and is regarded as a masterpiece of early mannerism. During the last three decades of his life, Michelangelo lent his talents to the design of numerous monuments and buildings for Rome, which the pope and city leaders were determined to restore to the grandeur of its ancient past. The Capitoline Square and the dome of St. Peter’s, designed by Michelangelo but not completed in his lifetime, remain two of Rome’s most famous visual landmarks.

Michelangelo worked until his death in 1564 at the age of 88. In addition to his major artistic works, he produced numerous other sculptures, frescoes, architectural designs, and drawings, many of which are unfinished and some of which are lost. He was also an accomplished poet, and some 300 of his poems are preserved. In his lifetime, he was celebrated as Europe’s greatest living artist, and today he is held up as one of the greatest artists of all time, as exalted in the visual arts as William Shakespeare is in literature or Ludwig van Beethoven is in music.
... History.com

There are parts of that narrative that do not match with what I learned in the past (I was under the impression he was the son of a small banker, i.e.), but he was quite a remarkable man who is not well remembered in the paper model community.  Many of you are familiar with J Ossorio.  It would be wonderful if he did some of his little models of the Pieta, Moses and David.  I could see Mauther doing one of his pop-ups of the Sistine Chapel.  Tatebanko versions of some of his paintings would be cool.  Or PaperPino could do some of his Christmas ornament globes of some of his paintings.

But since these don't exist, we will go with Canon's model of St. Peter's, http://cp.c-ij.com/jp/contents/CNT-0011409/index.html

Even though the dome wasn't completed until after his death, the lower sections and securing rings were done prior.  I'm not sure if the tour guide was correct, but she stated that the previous architect's design for the dome was deemed 'unsupportive', and would have led to the collapse of the whole structure.  Michelangelo's design is still standing to this day.  And most of the Western end of St. Peter's still shows Michelangelo's design for the structure.
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2017, 11:19:23 AM »
March 7, 1999 Stanley Kubrick Dies



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American  filmmaker Stanley Kubrick dies in Hertfordshire, England, at the age of 70. One of the most acclaimed film directors of the 20th century, Kubrick’s 13 feature films explored the dark side of human nature.

Born in New York City in 1928, Kubrick took up photography in high school and became a staff photographer for Look magazine at age 17. A photo assignment on boxing inspired him to make The Day of the Fight, a short documentary film about boxing, in 1951. The short was bought by a news service, and he made two more documentaries before making a short feature-length film, Fear and Desire (1953), which dealt with war. The movie, produced independently, received little attention outside New York, where critics praised Kubrick’s directorial talents.

Kubrick’s next two feature films, Killer’s Kiss (1955) and The Killing (1956), brought him to the attention of Hollywood, and in 1957 he directed actor Kirk Douglas in Paths of Glory, a story of military injustice in the French army during World War I. Douglas later enlisted Kubrick to take over production of Spartacus (1960), a historical epic about the slave rebellion led by the Roman slave Spartacus in 73 B.C. The film was a box office smash and won four Academy Awards, including Best Cinematography, which was attributed to Russell Metty but was largely Kubrick’s work. Behind the scenes, the director’s characteristic obsession with detail created some tension with the cast and crew.

After Spartacus, he moved permanently to England, where he directed Lolita (1962), based on the controversial novel by Vladimir Nabokov. Two years later, Kubrick scored another major critical and commercial hit with Dr. Strangelove, or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. Starring Peter Sellers and George C. Scott, Dr. Strangelove was a dark comedy about the nuclear arms race that earned Oscar nominations for Best Picture, Best Direction, Best Screenplay, and Best Actor (Peter Sellers).

Kubrick spent four years working on his next film, 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), co-written with English writer Arthur C. Clarke. Now widely regarded as the greatest science fiction film ever made, 2001: A Space Odyssey won Kubrick a well-deserved Best Visual Effects Academy Award. Kubrick followed up 2001 with A Clockwork Orange (1971), a controversial social commentary set in the near future. It was given an X rating in the United States for its extreme violence and banned in the United Kingdom, but nonetheless received four Oscar nominations including Best Picture.

Barry Lyndon (1975) was a picturesque movie based on the 19th-century novel by William Thackeray. Kubrick, who had become famous for his perfectionist tendencies, took a record 300 days just to shoot the film. The Shining (1980), starring Jack Nicholson as the caretaker of a mountain resort who goes insane, was hailed as a masterpiece of the horror genre. Full Metal Jacket (1987) addressed the Vietnam War and was another critical and commercial success. In 1997, after a 10-year absence from filmmaking, Kubrick began work on Eyes Wide Shut (1999), an enigmatic thriller starring Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman. The director died soon after turning in his final cut of the film.
... History.com

Hmm, of course there are 2001 models, and I posted Dr. Strangelove not too long ago, but it's been a while since I watched Full Metal Jacket, so I wouldn't want to post the wrong helicopter.  Couldn't find anything for The Shining or Clockwork Orange, so I guess I'll go with Eyes Wide Shut ... just kidding.

Of course there are Uhu02's models that are beyond my abilities, so I am going with Gary Pilsworth's Moonbus at http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/vbdownloads.php?do=download&downloadid=86
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2017, 12:14:09 PM »
Using Dave's post from a few years back.

Mar 8 1862...launch of the unfinished CSS Virginia into the battle of Hampton Roads (American Civil War)



The Battle of Hampton Roads began on March 8, 1862, when Virginia engaged the blockading Union fleet. Despite an all-out effort to complete her, the new ironclad still had workmen on board when she sailed into Hampton Roads with her flotilla of five CSN support ships: Raleigh (serving as Virginia's tender) and Beaufort, Patrick Henry, Jamestown, and Teaser.


Model of the Merrimac (CSS Virginia) here at the PaperShipWright:
https://www.papershipwright.co.uk/css-virginia/

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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2017, 11:53:48 AM »
March 9, 1918 First U.S. Airman Killed in Combat



Quote
Captain James Ely Miller, commanding officer, 95th Aero Squadron, 1st Pursuit Group, American Expeditionary Force, accepted the invitation of Major Davenport Johnson to join him and Major Harmon for a short patrol over the lines in three SPAD VII C.1 fighters borrowed from a French squadron.

Major Harmon’s SPAD had engine trouble and he turned back. Major Johnson and Captain Miller continued and encountered four German fighters. Shortly after the air battle began, Major Johnson abandoned the fight, leaving Captain Miller on his own. Captain Miller was shot down.

The German pilot who downed Miller and a German intelligence officer who had rushed to the crash scene witnessed Captain Miller’s dying words in which he cursed Major Davenport Johnson for leaving him during the air battle.

On 12 March, Major Johnson assumed command of the 95th.

Captain Miller was the first United States airman killed in combat. In 1919, Miller Field, Staten Island, New York, was named in his honor.

The airplane in this photograph is a SPAD VII C.1, serial number A.S. 94099, built by Société Pour L’Aviation et ses Dérivés, and restored by the 1st Fighter Wing, Selfridge Air Force Base, Michigan. It is in the collection of the National Museum of the United States Air Force, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.
... ThisDayinAviation



You can get your own SPAD VII C at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-100-spad-sa2-french-national-colors-paper-model.html
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