Author Topic: March (2017)  (Read 1233 times)

Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #22 on: March 21, 2017, 01:06:15 PM »
March 21, 1962 Launch the Bear!



Quote
A black bear named “Yogi” was ejected from a supersonic Convair B-58 Hustler to test the B-58’s escape capsule. Ejected at 35,000 feet (10,668 meters) from a B-58 flying at Mach 1.3 (approximately 870 miles per hour/1,400 kilometers per hour), the bear landed unharmed 7 minutes, 49 seconds later.

Previous testing with human subjects had resulted in fatalities so it was decided to continue with animal subjects while problems were resolved. Black bears (Ursus americanus) were used for these tests because their internal organs are arranged similar to humans.

The rocket booster carried the capsule 225 feet (69 meters meters) above the B-58 before beginning its descent.

Regrettably, although the bears survived the ejection tests, they were killed so that their organs could be examined. This would not be acceptable today.
... This Day in Aviation

Okay, not a B-58 ejection capsule, but you could easily rig up a harness for this bear, http://www.town.yakumo.lg.jp/modules/museum/content0040.html
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #23 on: March 22, 2017, 03:05:35 PM »
March 22, 1983 HMMWV Contract Awarded



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On this day in 1983, the Pentagon awards a production contract worth more than $1 billion to AM General Corporation to develop 55,000 High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWV). Nicknamed the Humvee and designed to transport troops and cargo, the wide, rugged vehicles entered the spotlight when they were used by the American military during the 1989 invasion of Panama and the Persian Gulf War in the early 1990s.

In 1992, a civilian version of the Humvee, known as the Hummer, went on sale. The hulking, attention-grabbing road warrior tipped the scales at some 10,000 pounds and got less than 10 miles per gallon. It was an early hit with Hollywood celebrities such as Arnold Schwarzenegger, who went on to own a fleet of Hummers. In December 1999, when the economy was strong and gas prices were relatively low, General Motors purchased the rights from AM General to market and distribute the Hummer. In 2002, the Hummer H2, a smaller (some 8,600 pounds), less expensive version of the original model, debuted.

The Hummer became a symbol of America’s super-sized lifestyle; however, the gas-guzzling vehicle was also a target of heavy criticism from environmentalists. According to a 2008 report on Salon.com, in August 2003, “Hummer-hating eco-vandals [struck] four car dealerships in Southern California’s San Gabriel Valley, destroying, defacing and burning dozens of Hummers and other SUVs, while scrawling love notes like ‘Fat, Lazy Americans’ about the premises.”

In 2005, the Hummer H3, an even smaller (5,800 pounds), more fuel-efficient (16 to 20 miles per gallon) vehicle, was released. The following year, GM ended production of the original Hummer, due to low sales. In 2008, as Americans faced a growing economic crisis and rising gas prices, along with increasing environmental concerns, Hummer sales shrunk by more than 50 percent. In December 2008, GM, which was hard hit by the global recession and slumping auto sales, received a multi-billion-dollar federal bailout loan in order to stay afloat. On June 1, 2009, the auto giant, which until 2008 had been the world’s top-selling maker of cars and trucks, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. The following day, GM announced that as part of its reorganization plans it would sell the Hummer brand to a Chinese machinery company.
...History.com

Of course Dave has his Easy-Build Hummer at http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/promotional_free_paper_models.html

But my favorite Hummer is Yuthdaw's at http://mypapermodel.blogspot.com.br/2010/01/humvee-military-papercraft.html, if you are looking for one that is a bit more challenging
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #24 on: March 23, 2017, 11:58:29 AM »
March 23, 1998 Cameron's Titanic Wins Eleven Oscars



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By the time James Cameron took the stage to accept his Academy Award for Best Director on the night of March 23, 1998, the Oscar dominance of his blockbuster film Titanic was all but assured. Titanic tied the record for most Oscar nominations with 14—joining 1950’s All About Eve—and by night’s end would tie with Ben Hur (1959) for most wins by sweeping 11 categories, including the coveted Best Picture.

With Aliens, The Abyss and the first two Terminator movies under his belt, Cameron had already proved himself a master of the action-packed science-fiction blockbuster genre. His ambition reached new heights with Titanic, a retelling of the ill-fated 1912 voyage of the unparalleled passenger steamship, which sank in the North Atlantic after striking an iceberg. Cameron’s films were notorious for going long over schedule and way over budget, and Titanic was worse than most. Originally budgeted at $100 million, the film eventually topped out at about $200 million, more than any other film in history; it also missed its original release date, making the studio executives sweat as they envisioned another Heaven’s Gate (the infamous big-budget flop that sank United Artists in the early 1980s).

Personally, Cameron was known for his dictatorial style, hot temper and obsession with detail. For his reenactment of the historic ship’s sinking, the film’s crew constructed a 775-foot (90 percent scale) replica of the RMS Titanic and put it in a tank containing 17 million gallons of water. Production was done in Mexico, and members of the cast and crew later complained about the harsh conditions, including shooting days of more than 20 hours, much of that time spent standing in cold, murky Pacific Ocean water.

Released just before Christmas in 1997, Titanic became a monster hit and continued to earn steadily at the box office over the next six months until it became the first movie ever to gross more than $1 billion internationally. Critical response to the film was divided. Many reviews were positive, but some critics praised the visual effects and action sequences—especially the last hour of the three-hour-plus movie, which depicts the epic sinking of the luxury liner—even while pointing out the weakness of the screenplay, which Cameron penned himself. In one particularly memorable pan, Kenneth Turan of the Los Angeles Times wrote that the film “reeks of phoniness and lacks even minimal originality.” Cameron famously fired back in a letter to the editor, demanding (unsuccessfully) that the Times “impeach Kenneth Turan.”

On Oscar night, Cameron echoed Leonardo DiCaprio’s character in Titanic by shouting “I’m the king of the world!” upon accepting his Best Director statuette. While accepting Best Picture (as the film’s producer), the filmmaker was slightly more subdued, asking for a moment of silence in remembrance of the more than 1,500 people who drowned on the Titanic.
... History.com

I despised that movie.  Watched it twice, because girls wanted to see it.  Not seeing it again would be fine with me.

You can get Titanic and her sisters at http://www.currell.net/models/mod_free.htm?filter=ship
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #25 on: March 24, 2017, 01:16:02 PM »
March 24, 1930 Steve McQueen Born



I'm sure you can guess which model I'm going to link to today ...



http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/racerz.html
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #26 on: March 24, 2017, 09:16:42 PM »
March 25, 1979 Columbia Delivered to Kennedy Space Center



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The first fully functional Space Shuttle orbiter, Columbia, was delivered to the John F Kennedy Space Center to be prepared for its first launch on March 25, 1979.

Construction began on Columbia in 1975 at Rockwell International's principal assembly facility outside Los Angeles.

As the second orbiter to be constructed, yet the first able to fly into space, Columbia was roughly 8,000 lb heavier than subsequent orbiters such as Endeavour. Later orbiters were of a slightly different design and had benefited from advances in materials technology.

Columbia, NASA’s first fully functional Space Shuttle, was originally scheduled to lift off in late 1979, however the launch date was pushed back after problems with both the SSME components and the thermal protection system.

Columbia would take its first mission, STS-1, on April 12, 1981. In total, Columbia flew 28 flights, spent 300.74 days in space, completed 4,808 orbits, and flew 125,204,911 miles (201,497,772 km) in total, including its final mission.

Columbia was the only shuttle to have been space worthy during both the Shuttle-Mir and International Space Station (ISS) programs and yet to have never visited either Mir or ISS.

Columbia was destroyed on February 1, 2003, upon atmospheric re-entry. An independent panel commissioned by NASA determined that the accident was caused by foam insulation breaking off from the Shuttle, forming debris that damaged the wing. The problem of "debris shedding" was well known but considered "acceptable" by management.

Had Columbia not been destroyed, its career would have begun to wind down after STS-118, a 2007 mission to the ISS that was instead flown by the orbiter Endeavour. Also, Columbia was to service the Hubble Space Telescope two more times in 2004 and in 2005, but no more missions were planned for it again until 2009.
... http://www.edn.com/electronics-blogs/edn-moments/4410584/Space-Shuttle-Columbia-is-delivered--March-25--1979

You can grab your Columbia at http://www.delta7studios.com/columbia.htm
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #27 on: March 24, 2017, 09:18:30 PM »
March 26, 2010 How to Train Your Dragon Released



Frankly, when I was doing all those models for my cousin, I wish this one had been available



You can get it at http://tos-craft.blogspot.com/2014/10/toothless-how-to-train-your-dragon-2.html
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #28 on: March 27, 2017, 01:10:20 PM »
March 27, 1968 Gagarin Dies

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Colonel Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin was killed in the crash of a MiG-15UTI two-place trainer near the town of Kirzach, Vladamir Oblast, Russia.

Yuri Gagarin was the first human to fly into space when he orbited Earth aboard Vostok I, 12 April 1961.
... This Day in Aviation



You can find Vostok I at http://web.archive.org/web/20110202024733/http://www.ericksmodels.com/gallery/vostok/vostok.html
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #29 on: March 28, 2017, 11:57:20 AM »
March 28, 1930 Constantinople Officially becomes Istanbul

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Istanbul is widely recognized as the name of Turkey's most well known city, but it was not always this way, and even today some confusion over its proper name still exists. The confusion is rooted in the various names the city assumed under the Ottomans in the centuries after their conquest of the city in 1453. Although the Ottomans did not purposely change the city's name, they opted to make "Constantinople" into a more Turkish style name "Konstantiniye" (which loosely translates as "of Constantine"), however variations on Konstantiniye soon cropped up.

 "Stanbulin," (Greek for "to the city") once commonly found on road signs directing travelers to the capital, was punned by devout Turks into Islambol, where "Islam abounds." The names Islambol and Konstantiniye were used interchangeably in Ottoman documents up until the empire's demise in 1923. Westerners continued to refer to the city as Constantinople well into the 20th century. In the 19th century, however, the city's large foreign expatriate community took to calling the old city Stamboul. Western accounts of the old city during this period make regular references to the name

 The name controversy was assumed to be settled when Atatürk officially renamed the city Istanbul in the 1920s. It took Westerners a few decades to accept the name, as Constantinople continued to appear on maps well into the 1960s, when it began to appear in parentheses next to Istanbul. The Greeks still do not use the Turkish name, and Konstantinopolis ( Κωνσταντινούπολις) continues to be used on maps and road signs in Greece today.
...Answers.Yahoo.com

When I saw this, I had to post http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vsQrKZcYtqg

And we'll go to Canon for the model, http://cp.c-ij.com/en/contents/CNT-0010012/index.html
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #30 on: March 29, 2017, 12:23:39 PM »
March 29, 1974 Mariner 10 Visits Mercury



Quote
The unmanned U.S. space probe Mariner 10, launched by NASA in November 1973, becomes the first spacecraft to visit the planet Mercury, sending back close-up images of a celestial body usually obscured because of its proximity to the sun.

Mariner 10 had visited the planet Venus eight weeks before but only for the purpose of using Venus’ gravity to whip it toward the closest planet to the sun. In three flybys of Mercury between 1974 and 1975, the NASA spacecraft took detailed images of the planet and succeeded in mapping about 35 percent of its heavily cratered, moonlike surface.

Mercury is the second smallest planet in the solar system and completes its solar orbit in only 88 earth days. Data sent back by Mariner 10 discounted a previously held theory that the planet does not spin on its axis; in fact, the planet has a very slow rotational period that stretches over 58 earth days. Mercury is a waterless, airless world that alternately bakes and freezes as it slowly rotates. Highly inhospitable, Mercury’s surface temperature varies from 800 degrees Fahrenheit when facing the sun to -279 degrees when facing away. The planet has no known satellites. Mariner 10 is the only human-created spacecraft to have visited Mercury to date.
...History.com

You can get a model of Mariner 10 in 1:24 scale at http://jleslie48.com/gallery_models_postapollo.html.  You'll have to scroll down quite a ways
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #31 on: March 30, 2017, 12:56:04 PM »
March 30, 1950 Robbie Coltrane Born



You can get Rubeus Hagrid's hut at http://www.mascal.it/paper2_e.html
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Vermin King

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Re: March (2017)
« Reply #32 on: March 31, 2017, 11:22:54 AM »
March 31, 1889  Eiffel Tower Opens



On March 31, 1889, the Eiffel Tower is dedicated in Paris in a ceremony presided over by Gustave Eiffel, the tower's designer, and attended by French Prime Minister Pierre Tirard, a handful of other dignitaries, and 200 construction workers.

In 1889, to honor of the centenary of the French Revolution, the French government planned an international exposition and announced a design competition for a monument to be built on the Champ-de-Mars in central Paris. Out of more than 100 designs submitted, the Centennial Committee chose Eiffel's plan of an open-lattice wrought-iron tower that would reach almost 1,000 feet above Paris and be the world's tallest man-made structure. Eiffel, a noted bridge builder, was a master of metal construction and designed the framework of the Statue of Liberty that had recently been erected in New York Harbor.

You can get the model at http://cp.c-ij.com/en/contents/CNT-0010408/index.html

Make sure you cut out all the triangles...
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet