Author Topic: May (2017)  (Read 876 times)

Vermin King

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May (2017)
« on: May 01, 2017, 08:54:09 AM »
May 1, 1989 MGM Studios Theme Park Opens



I'm glad I didn't have tickets that day...

Quote
Welcome to the Disney MGM Studios! Not only was it announced after the Universal Studios park, it managed to open a full year before. Quite a reversal from 2014, where we wait half a decade for a Seven Dwarfs coaster to appear while Universal rattles off Harry Potter Land 2 in the span of a few months. Here’s your Opening Day list of attractions.
1.The Great Movie Ride
2.The Magic of Disney Animation Tour
3.SuperStar Television
4.The Monster Sound Show
5.The Backstage Studio Tour
6.Hollywood! Hollywood! A Star Studded Spectacular!

Whoa, and you thought Animal Kingdom was light on things to do! It’s a little misleading. The two tour based attractions were rather long. And of course so is the Great Movie Ride and SuperStar Television. And let’s not forget about all those celebrities you were bound to see, what with all the actual movies being filmed there.
... Parkeology.com

Later in the year they started adding attractions, some of which are still going today.

For the models, go to Disney Experience and take a good look around.  I'm going to recommend the Big Thunder Mountain Railroad, though, http://www.disneyexperience.com/models/bigthunder_model.php

Or you can get the Liberty Square Haunted Mansion at http://www.haunteddimensions.raykeim.com/index301.html
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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2017, 01:23:33 PM »
May 2, 2008 Iron Man Released



You can get the model at http://rgatt.blogspot.com.br/2008/02/iron-paper-man.html
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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2017, 09:41:44 AM »
May 3, 1923  First Non-Stop Transcontinental Flight Completed



2–3 May 1923: United States Army Air Service pilots Lieutenant John Arthur Macready and Lieutenant Oakley George Kelly made the first non-stop transcontinental flight with a Fokker T-2 single-engine monoplane. The two aviators took off from Roosevelt-Hazelhurst Field, Long Island, New York, at 12:30 p.m. Eastern Time and landed at Rockwell Field (now, NAS North Island), San Diego, California, the next day at 12:26 p.m., Pacific Time. They had flown 2,470 miles (3,975 kilometers) in 26 hours, 50 minutes, 38.8 seconds, for an average speed of 92 miles per hour (148 kilometers per hour).

The United States Army transferred Fokker T-2 A.S. 64223, to the Smithsonian Institution in January 1924. It is on display at the National Air and Space Museum.



You can get yours at http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/aircraft/Fokker-T2.html

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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2017, 12:08:06 PM »
May 4, 1865  Abraham Lincoln Buried at Springfield, Illinois



On this day in 1865, Abraham Lincoln is laid to rest in his hometown of Springfield, Illinois.



His funeral train had traveled through 180 cities and seven states before reaching Springfield. At each stop, mourners paid their respects to Lincoln, who had been assassinated on April 14. Lincoln's son Willie, who died at age 11 from typhoid fever in 1862 and had originally been buried in Washington while Lincoln was serving as president, was interred next to his father in the family plot that same day.

The Lincoln Tomb Monument was completed in 1874.  Mary Todd Lincoln and three of his four sons are also buried there. (Robert Todd Lincoln is buried in Arlington National Cemetery at Arlington, Virginia).

You can download and build your own model of the Lincoln Tomb from https://www2.illinois.gov/ihpa/Preserve/Pages/construct_mainstreet.aspx#BYOL

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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2017, 11:17:30 AM »
May 5, 1961 Freedom 7



Quote
At 09:34:13 a.m., EST, 5 May 1961, Commander Alan Bartlett Shepard, Jr., United States Navy, was launched aboard Mercury-Redstone 3 from Launch Complex 5 at Cape Canaveral, Florida. The Mercury space craft, Freedom 7, was a one-man capsule built by McDonnell Aircraft. The Redstone MRLV rocket was a highly-modified version of a liquid-fueled U.S. Army ballistic missile, combining the first stage of a Jupiter C with the Rocketdyne AL-7 engine of the Redstone. This was the very first time that an American had been carried into space aboard a rocket and came 23 days after Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin had completed one orbit of the Earth.
... This Day in Aviation

You can get Ton's Mercury capsule at http://jleslie48.com/gallery_models_apollo.html

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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2017, 09:59:40 AM »
May 6, 1937 Hindenburg Disaster



Quote
The Hindenburg disaster took place on Thursday, May 6, 1937, as the German passenger airship LZ 129 Hindenburg caught fire and was destroyed during its attempt to dock with its mooring mast at the Lakehurst Naval Air Station, which is located adjacent to the borough of Lakehurst, New Jersey. Of the 97 people on board (36 passengers and 61 crewmen), there were 35 fatalities. There was also one death of a ground crewman.

The disaster was the subject of spectacular newsreel coverage, photographs, and Herbert Morrison's recorded radio eyewitness reports from the landing field, which were broadcast the next day. A variety of hypotheses have been put forward for both the cause of ignition and the initial fuel for the ensuing fire. The incident shattered public confidence in the giant, passenger-carrying rigid airship and marked the end of the airship era.
...History.com

You can download Bryan Tan's LZ129 Airship at http://rocketmantan.deviantart.com/art/LZ-129-Hindenburg-Airship-paper-model-312181994


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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2017, 10:05:11 AM »
May 7, 1958 F-104A Establishes Altitude Record



Quote
7 May 1958: Major Howard C. Johnson, United States Air Force, the operations officer of the 83rd Fighter Interceptor Squadron, 78th Fighter Group, based at Hamilton Air Force Base, California, zoom-climbed a Lockheed F-104A Starfighter, serial number 55-2957, to an altitude of 91,243 feet (27,811 meters) over Edwards Air Force Base, establishing a new Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) altitude record.

Major Johnson was part of a group of engineers and pilots awarded the Robert J. Collier Trophy by the National Aeronautic Association in 1958 for “the greatest achievement in aeronautics” because of their involvement in the Lockheed F-104 program.

Using techniques developed by Lockheed aerodynamicists, Major Johnson climbed to 41,000 feet (12,497 meters) and accelerated to the Starfighter’s maximum speed in level flight. He then started to climb, maintaining a steady 2.5 G load, until he reached the optimum climb angle. A piece of masking tape applied to the side of the cockpit canopy at the predetermined angle gave Johnson a visual reference during his climb. At approximately 77,000 feet (23,470 meters) the F-104’s J79 turbojet engine had to be shut down to prevent overheating in the thin high-altitude atmosphere. The interceptor continued from that point on a ballistic trajectory until it reached the peak altitude. On the descent, the engine was restarted and Johnson flew the Starfighter back to Edwards Air Force Base.

Major Johnson had broken the altitude record set just 17 days earlier by Lieutenant Commander George C. Watkins, U.S. Navy, flying an experimental Grumman F11F-1F Tiger. The Lockheed F-104 beat the Grumman F11F by 4,362 meters (14,311 feet).
...ThisDayinAviation

You can find a number of F-104 Stomp Rockets (graphics by Dave), as well as several models by Bruno at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/catalogsearch/result/?q=f-104&x=11&y=14

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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #7 on: May 08, 2017, 03:17:16 PM »
May 8, 2009 JJ Verse Star Trek Opens



Regardless of what you think of the reboot, it is a notable film, and I spent WAY to much time looking for the model, so I am posting Rawen's version from the film.  http://prmodels.webnode.cz/products/uss-enterprise-star-trek-and-star-trek-into-darkness-version-made-by-rawen/
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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2017, 12:11:47 PM »
May 9, 1914  President Wilson Issues Proclamation Making Mother's Day a National Holiday

Quote
The modern American holiday of Mother's Day was first celebrated in 1908, when Anna Jarvis held a memorial for her mother in Grafton, West Virginia. Her campaign to make "Mother's Day" a recognized holiday in the United States began in 1905, the year her beloved mother, Ann Reeves Jarvis, died. Anna’s mission was to honor her own mother by continuing work she had started and to set aside a day to honor mothers, "the person who has done more for you than anyone in the world." Anna's mother, Ann Jarvis, was a peace activist who had cared for wounded soldiers on both sides of the Civil War and created Mother’s Day Work Clubs to address public health issues.

Due to the campaign efforts of Anna Jarvis, several states officially recognized Mother's Day, the first in 1910 being West Virginia, Jarvis’ home state. In 1914 Woodrow Wilson signed the proclamation creating Mother’s Day, the second Sunday in May, as a national holiday to honor mothers. In a thank-you note to Wilson Jarvis wrote of a “great Home Day of our country for sons and daughters to honor their mothers and fathers and homes in a way that will perpetuate family ties and give emphasis to true home life.”
...History.com
It's not too late to hop over to the Canon site and make Mom something special for her day.
http://cp.c-ij.com/en/search/index.html?q=mother's%20day&categoryIndex=0
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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2017, 12:15:01 PM »
May 10, 1941  Hess Parachutes into Scotland



One year to the day after Germany invaded Holland and Belgium and Winston Churchill became Prime Minister, Rudolf Hess parachutes into Scotland in an attempt to negotiate a truce between Britain and Germany

On May 10, the day Hitler planned to invade Russia, and German bombs dropped on London in a spring "blitz," Hess parachuted into Scotland, hoping to negotiate peace with Britain, in the person of the Duke of Hamilton, whom Hess claimed to have met at the 1936 Berlin Olympics. Such a peace would have prevented Germany from fighting on two fronts and greatly increased Hess's own prestige within the Nazi regime.

He did, in fact, find peace—in the Tower of London, where the British imprisoned him, the last man ever to be held there under lock and key.  He wasn't there long.

A Messerschmitt Bf 110 would be an appropriate model, but we will have to settle for the Tower of London.  http://cp.c-ij.com/en/contents/CNT-0011747/index.html



No 'in quotes' on this one, because when I originally posted this a couple years back, there were many glorious rabbit trails.  So I referred to many articles to put it together.

Yes, I realize that I seem to recycle a lot of posts these days, but when I look to see what was already posted, I see if something interests me.  Then, since the internet is fluid, I find new images to replace the ones that don't show up on that date any more, and check to see if the links to the models have changed.  I then fix the old post with current links and copy to the current day's post.  I sometimes wonder if it would be easier to just do a new post rather than recycling, but this process helps to keep the old posts current, too
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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2017, 01:03:05 PM »
May 11, 1981  Bob Marley Dies



Quote
In what would prove to be the next to the last concert of his tragically short life, Bob Marley shared the bill at Madison Square Garden with the hugely popular American funk band The Commodores. With no costumes, no choreography and no set design to speak of, "The reggae star had the majority of his listeners on their feet and in the palm of his hand," according to New York Times critic Robert Palmer. "After this show of strength, and Mr. Marley's intense singing and electric stage presence, the Commodores were a letdown." Only days after his triumphant shows in New York City, Bob Marley collapsed while jogging in Central Park and later received a grim diagnosis: a cancerous growth on an old soccer injury on his big toe had metastasized and spread to Marley's brain, liver and lungs. Less than eight months later, on May 11, 1981, Bob Marley, the soul and international face of reggae music, died in a Miami, Florida, hospital. He was only 36 years old.
...History.com

No great models, but you can find a cube here:  http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5053/5550661813_23b7731213.jpg

There are no strangers in this world ...
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