Author Topic: May (2017)  (Read 867 times)

Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #11 on: May 12, 2017, 12:13:42 PM »
May 12, 1937 George Carlin Born



Man, will he ever be missed.

But you can have Rufus' time machine (and the telephone booth version) from http://www.chthulhu.com/models/rtm.html

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Dave Winfield

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #12 on: May 12, 2017, 12:59:12 PM »
Yes, I realize that I seem to recycle a lot of posts these days, but when I look to see what was already posted, I see if something interests me.  Then, since the internet is fluid, I find new images to replace the ones that don't show up on that date any more, and check to see if the links to the models have changed.  I then fix the old post with current links and copy to the current day's post.  I sometimes wonder if it would be easier to just do a new post rather than recycling, but this process helps to keep the old posts current, too

There is absolutely no reason to apologize for recycling earlier posts.
The amount of work you put into this is incredible and nobody can fault you for your efforts.

Since many of the posts are forgotten,  its good to be reminded of them.
And for those who showed up late to the show, these are all new posts anyway!
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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #13 on: May 12, 2017, 09:19:23 PM »
May 13, 2005 Final Episode of Star Trek: Enterprise Airs



The show is set in the nearby regions of the Milky Way galaxy around the year 2150, nearly one century before the original Star Trek series, aboard the starship Enterprise NX-01, Earth's first warp 5 capable ship which was designed for long-range exploration of the galaxy and captained by Jonathan Archer. The NX designation indicates that this Enterprise is an experimental prototype.

My one gripe is that as far as Species types, the prequel here is more diverse than either the original series, the Next Generation, or the movies.  I thought for the most part it was pretty good.

You can find the cleversantoro model at https://cleverpapermodel.com/startrek/
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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #14 on: May 12, 2017, 09:26:49 PM »
May 14, 1954 Dash-80 Rolls Off Line



Quote
The Boeing Model 367-80 prototype, N70700, was rolled out at the Boeing plant at Renton Field, south of Seattle, Washington. Boeing’s founder, William Edward Boeing (1881–1956) was present. The prototype made its first flight 15 July 1954 with Boeing test pilots Alvin M. “Tex” Johnston and Richard L. “Dix” Loesch. The prototype was painted brown and yellow.

Originally planned as a jet engine-powered development of the Boeing KC-97 Stratotanker, the Model 367, the 367-80 was the 80th major design revision. It is called the “Dash 80″.

Boeing had risked $16,000,000 in a private venture to build the Dash 80 in order to demonstrate its capabilities to potential civilian and military customers, while rivals Douglas and Lockheed were marketing their own un-built jet airliners. Put into production as the U.S. Air Force KC-135 Stratotanker air refueling tanker and C-135 Stratolifter transport, a civil variant was also produced as the Boeing 707 Stratoliner, the first successful jet airliner. Though they look very similar, the 707 is structurally different than the KC-135 and has a wider fuselage. The C-135 airframe was also used for the military E-3A Sentry AWACS command-and-control aircraft, the E-6 Mercury airborne command post, and other versions for reconnaissance, weather, and communications. 820 of the C-135 series and 1,010 Model 707 aircraft were built from 1957–1979.


The prototype Boeing Model 367-80 was operated by a pilot, co-pilot and flight engineer. The airplane’s wing was mounted low on the fuselage and the engine nacelles were mounted on pylons under the wing, as they were on Boeing’s B-47 Stratojet and B-52 Stratofortress. The wings and tail surfaces were swept to 35°. The Dash 80 was 127 feet 10 inches (38.964 meters) long with a wingspan of 129 feet, 8 inches (39.522 meters) and overall height of 38 feet (11.582 meters). Its empty weight was 92,100 pounds (41,775.9 kilograms) and loaded weight was 190,000 pounds (86,182.6 kilograms).

N70700 was powered by four Pratt and Whitney JT3 turbojet engines which produced 10,000 pounds of thrust, each. These gave the 367-80 a cruise speed of 550 miles per hour (885.2 kilometers per hour) and a maximum speed of 582 miles per hour (936.6 kilometers per hour) at 25,000 feet (7,620 meters). The service ceiling was 43,000 feet (13,106.4 meters). Its range was 3,530 miles (5,680.9 kilometers).

Boeing continued to use the 367–80 for testing, finally retiring it 22 January 1970. At that time, its logbook showed 2,346 hours, 46 minutes of flight time (TTAF). It was flown to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Tucson, Arizona, and placed in storage. In 1990, Boeing returned it to flyable condition and flew it back it to Renton where a total restoration was completed. Many of those who had worked on the Dash 80, Including Tex Johnston, were aboard.

The pioneering airplane was presented to the Smithsonian Institution and is on display at the National Air and Space Museum, Steven V. Udvar-Hazy Center.
... This Day in Aviation

You can find Aaron's 367-80 prototype at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-100-boeing-367-80-prototype-dash-80-paper-model.html
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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #15 on: May 15, 2017, 12:40:12 PM »
May 15, 1942 First Ford-Built B-24 Rolls Off Assembly Line




Quote
15 May 1942: The first Ford-built B-24 Liberator long range heavy bomber came off the assembly line at the Willow Run Airplane Plant. 6,971 more would follow, along with assembly kits for another 1,893, before production came to an end, 28 June 1945.
...ThisDayinAviation

You can find your own Liberator at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/catalogsearch/result/?q=b-24+liberator

(Thanks, Dave)
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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #16 on: May 16, 2017, 01:11:20 PM »
May 16, 1943 Operation Chastise



Quote
Nineteen modified Avro Lancaster B.III Special long-range heavy bombers of No. 617 Squadron, Royal Air Force, carried out Operation Chastise, a low-level night attack on four German hydroelectric dams in the Ruhr Valley.

The purpose of the attack was to disrupt German steel production. It was estimated that 8 tons of water were required to produce 1 ton of steel. Breaching the dams would reduce the available water and hydroelectric power, disrupt transportation of materials on the rivers and flood iron ore and coal mines and power plants. If the dams were destroyed, it was believed that the effects would be the same as attacks against 26 categories of industrial targets further down the Ruhr Valley.

Led by 24-year-old Wing Commander Guy Penrose Gibson, DSO and Bar, DFC and Bar, a veteran of 172 combat missions, the aircrews of No. 617 Squadron dropped a spinning cylindrical bomb, code-named “Upkeep”, from a height of just 60 feet (18.3 meters) over the reservoirs behind the dams, while flying at precisely 240 miles per hour (386.2 kilometers per hour).

The 9,250-pound (4,195.8 kilogram) Vickers Type 464 bomb, code-named “Upkeep,” was designed to skip along the surface and to strike the dam, and then sink to the bottom. There, a pressure detonator exploded the 6,600 pound (2,994 kilogram) Torpex charge directly against the wall with the water pressure directing the energy through the wall.

Nineteen Lancasters took off from RAF Scampton beginning at 9:28 p.m. on the 16th, and flew across the North Sea at only 100 feet (30.5 meters) to avoid being detected by enemy radar. The bombers succeeded in destroying the Möhne and Eder dams and damaging the Sorpe. A fourth dam was attacked but not damaged. The last surviving bomber returned to base at 6:15 a.m. on the 17th.

Of the nineteen Lancasters launched, two were damaged and turned back before reaching the targets. Six were shot down and two more collided with power lines during the low-level night flight. Of 133 airmen participating in the attack, 53 were killed.
... This Day in Aviation

You can get your Dambuster at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-56-dambuster-avro-lancaster-paper-model.html
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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2017, 01:04:46 PM »
May 17, 1942 First U.S. Army Helicopter Delivered



Quote
After a 761 mile (1,224.7 kilometer) flight over five days, test pilot Charles Lester (“Les”) Morris and Igor Sikorsky arrived at Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio, to deliver the U.S. Army’s first helicopter, the Sikorsky XR-4. Morris hovered directly up to the base administration building and landed there. He and Sikorsky were greeted by a large group of people which included Lieutenant Colonel Hollingsworth Franklin (“Frank”) Gregory, the Army’s designated rotorcraft expert, and pioneer aviator Orville Wright.
...ThisDayinAviation

You can get your own at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-50-sikorsky-r-4b-hoverfly-paper-model.html

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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #18 on: May 18, 2017, 02:27:30 PM »
May 18, 1958 Team Lotus Makes Formula 1 Debut



On May 18, 1958, Team Lotus made its first entry in the Formula One circuit, entering two single-seat Type 12s, driven by Cliff Allison and Graham Hill, into the Monaco Grand Prix. Though Ferrari was the favorite going into the race, British-made cars dominated the qualifying rounds, with Vanwall, British Racing Motors (BRM) and Cooper all finishing in front of Ferrari. In the main event, Maurice Trintignant (driving a Cooper) took first place after Ferrari's Mike Hawthorn, that year's eventual Formula One champion, was forced to stop with a broken fuel pump. Allison finished sixth in his Lotus, 13 laps behind the leader; Hill finished in 26th place.

Over the next four decades, Team Lotus will go on to become one of the most successful teams in Formula One history.

Paper Models of the Type 12 escape me, but there are many other Lotus models, including a transport over at Ichiyama's site:  http://www.geocities.jp/mekr200/f160/pg30.html#Lotus%20Transporter



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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #19 on: May 19, 2017, 01:51:07 PM »
May 19, 2007 Smart Launches US Road Show



Quote
Los Angeles, California, is the first stop on a cross-country road show launched on this day in 2007 by Smart USA to promote the attractions of its “ForTwo” microcar, which it had scheduled for release in the United States in 2008.

In the early 1990s, Nicholas Hayek of Swatch, the company famous for its wide range of colorful and trendy plastic watches, went to German automaker Mercedes-Benz with his idea for an “ultra-urban” car. The result of their joint venture was the diminutive Smart (an acronym for Swatch Mercedes ART) ForTwo, which debuted at the Frankfurt Motor Show in 1997 and went on sale in nine European countries over the next year. Measuring just over eight feet from bumper to bumper, the original ForTwo was marketed as a safe, fuel-efficient car that could be maneuvered easily through narrow, crowded city streets. Despite its popularity among urban Europeans, Smart posted significant losses, and Swatch soon pulled out of the joint venture.

Undaunted, Mercedes maker DaimlerChrysler (now Daimler AG) launched the Smart ForTwo in Canada in 2004 as an initial foray into the North American market. In June 2006, DaimlerChrysler chairman Dieter Zetsche announced that the Smart would make its U.S. debut in early 2008. Between 2003 and 2006, as reported by the German newspaper Handelsblatt, DaimlerChrysler took a loss of some 3.9 billion euros (around $5.2 billion) on the Smart brand, and the company looked to the U.S. market as a way to bring the brand into profitability.

The cross-country road show that began in May 2007 allowed consumers in 50 cities nationwide to test-drive the ForTwo. On each stop on the tour, a large truck served as a mobile exhibit dedicated to the microcar, complete with interactive displays and virtual demonstrations. As Dave Schembri, president of Smart USA, put it: “The Smart ForTwo is all about urban independence and freeing people from the constraints of city driving.” Under normal driving conditions, the ForTwo was designed to achieve 40 plus miles per gallon. The show was presumably a success: By September 2007, according to an article in MarketWatch, Smart USA said it had already received more than 30,000 registrations from potential buyers. The FortTwo went on sale in the United States in January 2008, at prices ranging from around $12,000 to around $21,000.
... History.com

I remember the first time I got into one at the Kansas City Auto Show.  Unfortunately the display was across the aisle from the Dodge trucks.  I thought this isn't made for folks with large feet as I maneuvered into the drivers seat.  Checked out the dashboard, then was checking the visibility.  One look in the rearview mirror of the lower half of the grill and the front bumper of the Dodge 1500 behind me made me realize that this car would never be for me.

But Julius made a couple great models, http://paper-replika.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=8132:mercedes-benz-smart-cabrio-paper-model&catid=124:transportation&Itemid=207624

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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #20 on: May 19, 2017, 02:13:04 PM »
Okay, I'm a bit miffed.  As I was scrolling through old posts, I noticed that Monday will be the anniversary of the first wagon train on the Oregon Trail.  The post is from a few years back, and in there was a reference to the Weston Wagon Shop, which was still standing (probably) when I posted.  This spring, I took a day to visit some of the pre-Civil War spots in town, and when I got to the location of the Weston shop, it is now gone.  The city demolished it to expand the Farmers' Market.

The shop that built so many of the wagons for the Oregon, California and Santa Fe trails is gone.  How can our city leaders be so stupid ...
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Dave Winfield

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #21 on: May 19, 2017, 03:44:54 PM »
Monday is Victoria Day in Canada, if that helps? lol
Although I have no clue what model to suggest.

Victoria Day in Canada is celebrated wildly by all Canadians even though they have little knowledge of who Victoria is.
Sometimes referred to as "Fireworks Day", it is most commonly referred to as "May Two Four Weekend".
Two-Four referring to the 24th of May, or the closest weekend...and a Two-Four of Beer. (Case of 24)
Since May 2-4 is the first "long weekend" (holiday) marking the beginning of the Summer and an excuse to quaff excessive amounts of wobbly pops.

Happy May 2-4 eh?!!!

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DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!