Author Topic: May (2017)  (Read 868 times)

Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #22 on: May 19, 2017, 05:39:02 PM »
A Queen Victoria mask?
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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #23 on: May 20, 2017, 12:41:43 PM »
May 20, 1941  XP-51 Maiden Flight




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North American Aviation test pilot Robert C. Chilton takes the first XP-51 for its maiden flight. The fourth production Mustang Mk.I for the R.A.F., AG348, it was reassigned to the U.S. Army Air Force as XP-51 serial number 41-038 and sent to Wright Field for evaluation. Later it was extensively tested by NACA at Langley Field, Virginia. Today, the restored XP-51 is in the collection of the E.A.A. AirVenture Museum at Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

Two Mustang Mk.Is, AG348 and AG354, were taken from the first RAF production order and sent to Wright Field for testing by the U.S. Army Air Force. These airplanes, assigned serial numbers 41-038 and 41-039, were designated XP-51. They would be developed into the legendary P-51 Mustang. In production from 1941 to 1945, a total of 16,766 Mustangs of all variants were built.
...ThisDayinAviation

For the model, http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/vbdownloads.php?do=download&downloadid=621
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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #24 on: May 21, 2017, 09:59:21 AM »
May 21, 1927  Lindbergh Lands in Paris

After a 33 hour, 30 minute flight from Roosevelt Field, Long Island, New York, Charles A. Lindbergh lands his Spirit of St. Louis at Le Bourget Aerodrome, Paris, France. He is the first pilot to fly solo, non-stop, across the Atlantic Ocean.



Let's go with the Canon model at http://cp.c-ij.com/en/contents/CNT-0011913/index.html



Okay, I couldn't find the cartoon, but Robert Ripley created a hornets nest when he posted a congratulatory Believe It or Not on Lindbergh being the 67th person to cross the Atlantic by air.  (It may have been 63rd, which is why I was trying hard to find the cartoon).  It was almost three months later that he explained it:  two airships and three non-solo airplane flights, so the 67 must be correct.  I did find this one



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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #25 on: May 22, 2017, 09:16:29 AM »
May 22, 2017  Happy Victoria Day!
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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #26 on: May 22, 2017, 12:05:14 PM »
May 22, 1843 First Wagon Train on Oregon Trail Departs



Quote
A massive wagon train, made up of 1,000 settlers and 1,000 head of cattle, sets off down the Oregon Trail from Independence, Missouri. Known as the “Great Emigration,” the expedition came two years after the first modest party of settlers made the long, overland journey to Oregon.

After leaving Independence, the giant wagon train followed the Sante Fe Trail for some 40 miles and then turned northwest to the Platte River, which it followed along its northern route to Fort Laramie, Wyoming. From there, it traveled on to the Rocky Mountains, which it passed through by way of the broad, level South Pass that led to the basin of the Colorado River. The travelers then went southwest to Fort Bridger, northwest across a divide to Fort Hall on the Snake River, and on to Fort Boise, where they gained supplies for the difficult journey over the Blue Mountains and into Oregon. The Great Emigration finally arrived in October, completing the 2,000-mile journey from Independence in five months.

In the next year, four more wagon trains made the journey, and in 1845 the number of emigrants who used the Oregon Trail exceeded 3,000. Travel along the trail gradually declined with the advent of the railroads, and the route was finally abandoned in the 1870s.
... History.com



Since I live in Independence, I am somewhat of a history buff where it comes to the Westward Migration.  I'm not sure why Independence was really the Gateway to Westward Expansion, but the Santa Fe, California and Oregon Trails all started here.  Until the 1856 flood that changed the whole area around the Wayne City Landing, Wayne City was the main jumping off point.  Blue Mills Landing was on the other side of a bend to the east, which was an easier, but longer road to Independence, but until the flood, Wayne City Landing was the place to start.  There was a dip in the limestone bluffs there, so once you got to the top, you took River Road straight into Independence.  Wayne City was also the site of the first rail line west of the Mississippi.  Ox drawn.  I am really ticked off at Independence, though.  The old Weston wagon shop was leveled to build an expanded farmers market.  Why they didn't restore it, and make it into an admin office or something, I don't know.

Back to Wayne City Landing -- Lewis and Clark camped there, too.  This is the one place where four major trails intersect:  Lewis & Clark, Santa Fe, California and Oregon.



Last time I posted this I chose the FiddlersGreen covered wagon, but since I'm dealing more with the Wayne City Landing today, our model is one of the steamboats from Seite42, http://www.seite42.de/79_17e.htm

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Vermin King

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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #27 on: May 23, 2017, 01:17:54 PM »
May 23, 1953  Jackie Cochran Sets FAI Speed Record



23 May 1953: At Edwards Air Force Base, California, Jackie Cochran set another Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) speed record with the Canadair CL-13 Sabre Mk.3, No. 19200. Flying over a 500-kilometer closed circuit without payload, the Orenda-powered Sabre averaged 952.032 kilometers per hour (591.565 miles per hour).

Sabre Mk.3 No. 19200 was a one-of a kind CL-13 Sabre (an F-86E Sabre produced by Canadair Ltd. at Montreal, Quebec, under license from North American Aviation, Inc.) built to test the prototype Avro Canada Orenda 3 turbojet engine. Modifications to the airframe were required to install the larger engine. The Orenda produced 6,000 pounds of thrust, a 15% improvement over the J47-GE-13 engine installed in the standard F-86E.

After the speed records, No. 19200 was sent to North American Aviation for evaluation. Today, it is on static display outdoors at Wetaskiwin Regional General Airport (CEX3), Alberta, Canada.

You would have to mod your F-86 or CL-13, but a number of Sabres are available at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/catalogsearch/result/index/?p=4&q=Canadair+CL-13+Sabre.  Bruno even has a CL-13 in RCAF livery, but the record-breaker didn't have that
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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #28 on: May 24, 2017, 12:54:48 PM »
May 24, 1883 Brooklyn Bridge Opens



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After 14 years and 27 deaths while being constructed, the Brooklyn Bridge over the East River is opened, connecting the great cities of New York and Brooklyn for the first time in history. Thousands of residents of Brooklyn and Manhattan Island turned out to witness the dedication ceremony, which was presided over by President Chester A. Arthur and New York Governor Grover Cleveland. Designed by the late John A. Roebling, the Brooklyn Bridge was the largest suspension bridge ever built to that date.

John Roebling, born in Germany in 1806, was a great pioneer in the design of steel suspension bridges. He studied industrial engineering in Berlin and at the age of 25 immigrated to western Pennsylvania, where he attempted, unsuccessfully, to make his living as a farmer. He later moved to the state capital in Harrisburg, where he found work as a civil engineer. He promoted the use of wire cable and established a successful wire-cable factory.

Meanwhile, he earned a reputation as a designer of suspension bridges, which at the time were widely used but known to fail under strong winds or heavy loads. Roebling is credited with a major breakthrough in suspension-bridge technology: a web truss added to either side of the bridge roadway that greatly stabilized the structure. Using this model, Roebling successfully bridged the Niagara Gorge at Niagara Falls, New York, and the Ohio River at Cincinnati, Ohio. On the basis of these achievements, New York State accepted Roebling’s design for a bridge connecting Brooklyn and Manhattan–with a span of 1,595 feet–and appointed him chief engineer. It was to be the world’s first steel suspension bridge.

Just before construction began in 1869, Roebling was fatally injured while taking a few final compass readings across the East River. A boat smashed the toes on one of his feet, and three weeks later he died of tetanus. He was the first of more than two dozen people who would die building his bridge. His 32-year-old son, Washington A. Roebling, took over as chief engineer. Roebling had worked with his father on several bridges and had helped design the Brooklyn Bridge.

The two granite foundations of the Brooklyn Bridge were built in timber caissons, or watertight chambers, sunk to depths of 44 feet on the Brooklyn side and 78 feet on the New York side. Compressed air pressurized the caissons, allowing underwater construction. At that time, little was known of the risks of working under such conditions, and more than a hundred workers suffered from cases of compression sickness. Compression sickness, or the “bends,” is caused by the appearance of nitrogen bubbles in the bloodstream that result from rapid decompression. Several died, and Washington Roebling himself became bedridden from the condition in 1872. Other workers died as a result of more conventional construction accidents, such as collapses and a fire.

Roebling continued to direct construction operations from his home, and his wife, Emily, carried his instructions to the workers. In 1877, Washington and Emily moved into a home with a view of the bridge. Roebling’s health gradually improved, but he remained partially paralyzed for the rest of his life. On May 24, 1883, Emily Roebling was given the first ride over the completed bridge, with a rooster, a symbol of victory, in her lap. Within 24 hours, an estimated 250,000 people walked across the Brooklyn Bridge, using a broad promenade above the roadway that John Roebling designed solely for the enjoyment of pedestrians.

The Brooklyn Bridge, with its unprecedented length and two stately towers, was dubbed the “eighth wonder of the world.” The connection it provided between the massive population centers of Brooklyn and Manhattan changed the course of New York City forever. In 1898, the city of Brooklyn formally merged with New York City, Staten Island, and a few farm towns, forming Greater New York.
...History.com

The Brooklyn Bridge models leave a little bit to be desired (I wish Canon would do one), but the PaperToys model would look pretty good if printed on a light brown cardstock, http://papertoys.com/brooklyn-bridge.htm
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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #29 on: May 25, 2017, 10:12:15 AM »
May 25, 1977 Star Wars Opens



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On this day in 1977, Memorial Day weekend opens with an intergalactic bang as the first of George Lucas’ blockbuster Star Wars movies hits American theaters.

The incredible success of Star Wars–it received seven Oscars, and earned $461 million in U.S. ticket sales and a gross of close to $800 million worldwide–began with an extensive, coordinated marketing push by Lucas and his studio, 20th Century Fox, months before the movie’s release date. “It wasn’t like a movie opening,” actress Carrie Fisher, who played rebel leader Princess Leia, later told Time magazine. “It was like an earthquake.” Beginning with–in Fisher’s words–“a new order of geeks, enthusiastic young people with sleeping bags,” the anticipation of a revolutionary movie-watching experience spread like wildfire, causing long lines in front of movie theaters across the country and around the world.

With its groundbreaking special effects, Star Wars leaped off screens and immersed audiences in “a galaxy far, far away.” By now everyone knows the story, which followed the baby-faced Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) as he enlisted a team of allies–including hunky Han Solo (Harrison Ford) and the robots C3PO and R2D2–on his mission to rescue the kidnapped Princess Leia from an Evil Empire governed by Darth Vader. The film made all three of its lead actors overnight stars, turning Fisher into an object of adoration for millions of young male fans and launching Ford’s now-legendary career as an action-hero heartthrob.

Star Wars was soon a bona-fide pop culture phenomenon. Over the years it has spawned five more feature films, five TV series and an entire industry’s worth of comic books, toys, video games and other products. Two big-screen sequels, The Empire Strikes Back (1980) and The Return of the Jedi (1983), featured much of the original cast and enjoyed the same success–both critical and commercial–as the first film. In 1999, Lucas stretched back in time for the fourth installment, Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, chronologically a prequel to the original movie. Two other prequels, Attack of the Clones (2002) and Revenge of the Sith (2005) followed.

The latter Star Wars movies featured a new cast–including Ewan McGregor, Liam Neeson, Natalie Portman and Hayden Christensen–and have generally failed to earn the same amount of critical praise as the first three films. They continue to score at the box office, however, with Revenge of the Sith becoming the top-grossing film of 2005 in the United States and the second worldwide.
  ...History.com

And talk about all the Star Wars crap they were able to market...

I was going to post the Falcon, but SFPapercraft is evidently updating the model, so it is down, so here's R2, http://www7a.biglobe.ne.jp/~sf-papercraft/sf/r2d2.html

And don't forget Dave's speeder, http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/starcarz.html

And Chris's Homestead, http://www.papierschnitzel.com/lars-homestead-released/

And ...
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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #30 on: May 26, 2017, 12:29:56 PM »
May 26, 1897 Dracula Goes on Sale in London



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The first copies of the classic vampire novel Dracula, by Irish writer Bram Stoker, appear in London bookshops on this day in 1897.

A childhood invalid, Stoker grew up to become a football (soccer) star at Trinity College, Dublin. After graduation, he got a job in civil service at Dublin Castle, where he worked for the next 10 years while writing drama reviews for the Dublin Mail on the side. In this way, Stoker met the well-respected actor Sir Henry Irving, who hired him as his manager. Stoker stayed in the post for most of the next three decades, writing Irving’s voluminous correspondence for him and accompanying him on tours in the United States. Over the years, Stoker began writing a number of horror stories for magazines, and in 1890 he published his first novel, The Snake’s Pass.

Stoker would go on to publish 17 novels in all, but it was his 1897 novel Dracula that eventually earned him literary fame and became known as a masterpiece of Victorian-era Gothic literature. Written in the form of diaries and journals of its main characters, Dracula is the story of a vampire who makes his way from Transylvania–a region of Eastern Europe now in Romania–to Yorkshire, England, and preys on innocents there to get the blood he needs to live. Stoker had originally named the vampire “Count Wampyr.” He found the name Dracula in a book on Wallachia and Moldavia written by retired diplomat William Wilkinson, which he borrowed from a Yorkshire public library during his family’s vacations there.

Vampires–who left their burial places at night to drink the blood of humans–were popular figures in folk tales from ancient times, but Stoker’s novel catapulted them into the mainstream of 20th-century literature. Upon its release, Dracula enjoyed moderate success, though when Stoker died in 1912 none of his obituaries even mentioned Dracula by name. Sales began to take off in the 1920s, when the novel was adapted for Broadway. Dracula mania kicked into even higher gear with Universal’s blockbuster 1931 film, directed by Tod Browning and starring the Hungarian actor Bela Lugosi. Dozens of vampire-themed movies, television shows and literature followed, though Lugosi, with his exotic accent, remains the quintessential Count Dracula. Late 20th-century examples of the vampire craze include the bestselling novels of American writer Anne Rice and the cult hit TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer.
...History.com

For the model, I'm going with the vampire mask from Ravensblight, http://ravensblight.com/VampireMask.html
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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #31 on: May 26, 2017, 12:42:27 PM »
May 27, 1941 Bismarck Sunk



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On May 27, 1941, the British navy sinks the German battleship Bismarck in the North Atlantic near France. The German death toll was more than 2,000.

On February 14, 1939, the 823-foot Bismarck was launched at Hamburg. Nazi leader Adolf Hitler hoped that the state-of-the-art battleship would herald the rebirth of the German surface battle fleet. However, after the outbreak of war, Britain closely guarded ocean routes from Germany to the Atlantic Ocean, and only U-boats moved freely through the war zone.

In May 1941, the order was given for the Bismarck to break out into the Atlantic. Once in the safety of the open ocean, the battleship would be almost impossible to track down, all the while wreaking havoc on Allied convoys to Britain. Learning of its movement, Britain sent almost the entire British Home Fleet in pursuit. On May 24, the British battle cruiser Hood and battleship Prince of Wales intercepted it near Iceland. In a ferocious battle, the Hood exploded and sank, and all but three of the 1,421 crewmen were killed. The Bismarck escaped, but because it was leaking fuel it fled for occupied France. On May 26, it was sighted and crippled by British aircraft, and on May 27 three British warships descended on the Bismarck and finished it off.
...History.com

Going with Zio's Bismarck.  Had to go back to where it was stored in 2012, to find a working link, http://web.archive.org/web/20120209190344/http://www.zioprudenzio.it:80/fok-ship.html
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Re: May (2017)
« Reply #32 on: May 26, 2017, 12:46:43 PM »
May 28, 1935 BF-109 First Flight



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Bayerische Flugzeugwerke (BFW) test pilot Hans-Dietrich Knoetzsch to the prototype Bf 109 V1 fighter, civil registration D-IABI, on its first flight at Haunstetten, near Augsburg, Germany. The duration of the flight was twenty minutes.

The new fighter (which would be redesignated Me 109 after BFW became Messerschmitt AG in 1938) was designed by Wilhelm Emil Messerschmitt, Walter Rethel and Robert Lusser. It was a light weight, single seat, single-engine low-wing monoplane with retractable landing gear.

The first prototype, Versuchsflugzeug 1, was 8.884 meters (29.147 feet) long with a wingspan of 9.890 meters (32.448 feet). The empty weight was 1,404 kilograms (3,095 pounds) and the maximum weight was 1,800 kilograms (3,968 pounds).

Because the liquid-cooled Junkers Jumo 210 inverted V-12 engines planned for the new fighter were not yet available, a supercharged, liquid-cooled 1,295.88-cubic-inch-displacement (21.24 liter) Rolls-Royce Kestrel VI single overhead cam (SOHC) 60° V-12 was installed. This British engine produced 695 horsepower and turned a two-bladed, wooden, fixed-pitch Schwarz propeller.

V1’s maximum airspeed was 470 kilometers per hour (292 miles per hour) and its maximum altitude was 8,000 meters (26,247 feet).

No armament was installed on the prototype.

The Bf 109 V1 was tested for several months before being sent to the Luftwaffe test center at Rechlin for acceptance trials. The prototype’s landing gear collapsed while landing there.

The prototype Bf 109 was revealed to the public when D-IABI flew at the Games of the XI Olympiad (the 1936 Summer Olympics, held at Berlin, Germany). The Me 109 was produced from 1937 to 1945. Total production was 33,894 aircraft, which amounted to 57% of total fighter production for Germany. Seven plants produced the Me 109 during World War II. After the war ended, Czechoslovakia produced a variant until 1948. Another Spanish-built variant remained in production until 1958.
... This Day in Aviation

Jerry did a video of the build of the Modelik BF-109, but Modelik blocked it, so we'll go with the FG model, http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/Aircraft/Messerschmitt-Me109.html
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