Author Topic: June (2017)  (Read 870 times)

Vermin King

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June (2017)
« on: May 31, 2017, 10:52:15 PM »
June 1, 1939 FW 190 V1 First Flight



Quote
At Bremen, Germany, Focke-Wulf Flugzeugbau AG chief test pilot Flugkapitän Hans Sander took the first prototype of a new fighter, Fw 190 V1, W.Nr. 0001, registration D-OPZE, for its first flight.

The Fw 190 was designed as a fast light-weight fighter with a powerful engine, easy to maintain under field conditions and able to absorb a reasonable amount of combat damage. The landing gear had a wide track which improved ground handling and was an advantage when operating on unimproved airfields. The mechanism used the gear’s own weight to lower it into place. Another interesting feature was to use of pushrods and bearings in place of the common cables and pulleys used to operate the flight controls. This gave a more precise, responsive operation. Also, the recent introduction of vacuforming allowed a large one piece “bubble” canopy to be used rather than the plexiglas/metal framework which was used in other fighters, such as the Messerschmitt Bf 109.

After testing by Focke-Wulf at Bremen, Fw 190 V1 was flown to the Luftwaffe test site at Rechlin-Lärz Airfield. Its identification markings were changed to FO+LY. Later, they were changed again to RM+CA. V1 continued to be used for testing until 29 March 1943.

The Fw 190 was the most effective of Germany’s world War II fighters. More than 20,000 were built in 16 variants. The Focke-Wulf factory at Marienburg and the AGO Flugzeugwerke at Oschersleben were frequently attacked by Allied bombers.
... This Day in Aviation

You can grab your own FW 190 at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-50-focke-wulf-fw-190a-5-paper-model.html
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Vermin King

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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2017, 10:36:55 AM »
June 2, 1943 ‘Battle in the Bay’ – Sunderland v Ju 88s





Quote
The aircraft of RAF Coastal Command were spread far and wide as the Allies sought to extend their surveillance of the seas. In turn of course the Germans were intent on fighting back. They attempted to arm their U-boats with better anti-aircraft guns. And they brought in more aircraft to take on the U-boat hunters.

No sea area was contested more fiercely than the Bay of Biscay. Here RAF aircraft were proving remarkably successful in catching U-boats as they departed from their French bases or returned from patrols. But the hunters soon became the hunted as the Luftwaffe brought more planes back to the area.

On 2nd June 1943 a Sunderland of 461 Squadron R.A.A.F took on eight Ju 88 and won. It was a remarkable air battle, memorably recorded by Ivan Southall, a member of the Squadron at the time:


1855 hours. The turrets moved slowly while eyes strained in the sunlight. This was indeed the Tiger Country, a slaughteryard, a stage for a play of suspense and savagery, where all men at one time or another knew the meaning of fear. Here there were no parachutes and no patriots in the back country.

1900 hours. Goode, swinging his tail turret to the right, suddenly stopped. His eyes widened and his heart missed a beat:
“Tail to Control,” he barked.“Eight aircraft. Thirty degrees on the port quarter. Six miles. Up one thousand feet.”
Pause. Electric silence. A moment or two of shock. Simpson suddenly jumped to the astrodome. Walker rammed his throttles wide and sounded the alarm. Dowling hauled on the pitch levers and the engines howled at twenty-six hundred revolutions a minute.
“Control to Tail. Can you identify those aircraft?”
 “Twin-engined,” said Goode. “Probably Junkers 88’s.”
They were. They came sweeping in at high speed.

“Captain to Wireless Operator.” Walker’s voice was sharp and urgent.
“Message to Group. O/A Priority. Attacked by eight JU-88s . . . . How’s that inner engine, Engineer?”
 “No worse, Captain. No better.”
 “Captain to Galley. Have you got the bomb-racks out?”
 “Ready, Captain.”
 “Right. Bombs gone. You’ve got to work fast. Run in the racks, close the doors, and get cracking with the galley guns. Who’s down there to man them?”
 “Miles on the starboard, sir. Lane on the port.”
 “Thanks.”
 “Control to all positions.” That was Simpson again. “They’ve spread all round us. Hold your fire until they’re in range. Don’t shoot before six hundred yards. Three are on the Starboard beam; three port beam; one on each quarter. Range fifteen hundred yards; fifteen hundred feet up.”
Simpson paused and they all waited. Suddenly his voice was there again, precise, calm, yet – underlaid with urgency.
“Okay. They’re coming. One peeling off from each beam. Prepare to corkscrew. Twelve hundred yards. One thousand yards. They’re firing. Prepare to corkscrew to starboard. Eight hundred yards. Corkscrew starboard. Go!”
Walker jammed over the wheel with a violent thrust of strength. The Sunderland screwed steeply down. Shell and tracer blasted right through it. “Corkscrew port. Port. Now port. Go!”
Walker savagely reversed controls. The boat shuddered with shock and climbed giddily to the left. The port-outer engine burst into flames. Smoke and fire scattered over the wing. Incendiary bullets ripped up the cockpit. Walkers compass blew up and sprayed him with blazing alcohol. Liquid fire splashed across the bridge and poured down the companionway into the bow compartment.

Through a confusion of sound and vibration and choking smoke Walker heard Simpson urging him to straighten up. But two more 88’s were on the way in. They had blooded. They had scored in the first attack. They were screaming in for the kill. Walker yelled at Dowling.
“Take over! Fly it! We’ve got to get these fires out!”
Amiss wrenched the extinguisher from its bracket on the bulkhead and turned it full onto the captain, because Walker was burning. Simpson’s calm voice still was coming through the earphones.
“Eight hundred yards,” he was saying. “Corkscrew port . . . Corkscrew port . . . .”
And Walker was hearing it but seeing nothing, only smelling the smoke and the extinguishing fluid, and now the Sunderland was plunging down again and Dowling was fighting the controls. Amiss, hanging on his extinguisher and clinging for support to anything he could hold, was chasing the fires. Walker pressed the Graviner switch to extinguish the blazing engine. The fire snuffed out into clouds of white smoke which the aircraft left behind it as a billowing trail. The engine was finished. The airscrews windmilled and dragged and Dowling was up against it. Walker swung on Amiss again.
“Give the wireless operator a message for Group, On Fire.”

The 88’s were still coming in, again and again. They pressed home their attacks with increasing fury and reckless courage and Dowling could, scarcely hold his aircraft. It was pulling like a mad thing to port into the dead engine. He wound the trimming tabs over as fast as his hand could fly, but it still didn’t take up the pressure; he still had full weight jammed against the rudder pedal to hold it in control. Simpson’s voice suddenly dropped in pitch.
“They’re reforming. They’ve returned to the quarters and the beams.”
There was a pause, a breather for a few seconds. Amiss overcame the fires on the bridge and Walker again took the controls. There was a brief silence on the intercom. They were in terrible trouble, and there wasn’t a man aboard who tried to deceive himself into believing that they weren’t. Suddenly a new voice came over the intercom. It was Fuller in the midships turret, up there on top in the weakening sunlight. He was singing:
“Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition, Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition.”
 “They’re coming,” said Simpson. “One from port and one from starboard."
...ww2today.com

This event took place the day after BOAC Flight 777-A was shot down over the Bay of Biscay in which the actor Leslie Howard was killed.  German Intelligence considered it a 'high probability' that Winston Churchill was on that plane.  It would appear that things were really getting tight there as the British U-Boat hunting efforts were seeing success and the Germans were attempting to stop it. 

You can find your own Sunderland Short at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-48-a26-short-sunderland-nj184-raaf.html
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Vermin King

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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2017, 11:34:42 AM »
June 3, 1947  John Charles Dykstra Born



Okay, I'm sure that there will be many asking 'John Dykstra who?'

He is a pioneer of movie special effects.  Godzilla, X-Men: First Class, Hancock, Spider-Man I and II, Batman & Robin, Batman Forever, My Stepmother is an Alien, Invaders from Mars, Alice in Wonderland [1985 – TV], Lifeforce, Firefox, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, Battlestar Galactica, Star Wars: Episode IV, Silent Running

You can check out his awards at http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0004375/awards?ref_=nm_awd

Look at that list.  Which model to choose?  Hmmm.  Well since Lucas and he had a falling out, we won't use Star Wars, so let's go with Battlestar Galactica.  http://stevespaper.com/?page_id=66

I'd go with one of the Raptors myself

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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2017, 07:30:06 AM »
June 4, 1942 The Battle of Midway Begins



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On this day in 1942, Japanese Admiral Chuichi Nagumo, commander of the fleet that attacked Pearl Harbor, launches a raid on Midway Island with almost the entirety of the Japanese navy.

As part of a strategy to widen its sphere of influence and conquest, the Japanese set their sights on an island group in the central Pacific, Midway, as well as the Aleutians, off the coast of Alaska. They were also hoping to draw the badly wounded U.S. navy into a battle, determined to finish it off.

The American naval forces were depleted: The damaged carrier Yorktown had to be repaired in a mere three days, to be used along with the Enterprise and Hornet, all that was left in the way of aircraft carriers after the bombing at Pearl Harbor.

On the morning of June 4, Admiral Nagumo launched his first strike with 108 aircraft, and did significant damage to U.S. installations at Midway. The Americans struck back time and again at Japanese ships, but accomplished little real damage, losing 65 of their own aircraft in their initial attempts. But Nagumo underestimated the tenacity of both Admiral Chester Nimitz and Admiral Raymond Spruance, commanders of the American forces. He also miscalculated tactically by ordering a second wave of bombers to finish off what he thought was only a remnant of American resistance (the U.S. forces had been able to conceal their position because of reconnaissance that anticipated the Midway strike) before his first wave had sufficient opportunity to rearm.

A fifth major engagement by 55 U.S. dive-bombers took full advantage of Nagumo’s confused strategy, and sunk three of the four Japanese carriers, all cluttered with aircraft and fuel trying to launch another attack against what they now realized—too late—was a much larger American naval force than expected. A fourth Japanese carrier, the Hiryu was crippled, but not before its aircraft finished off the noble American Yorktown.

The attack on Midway was an unmitigated disaster for the Japanese, resulting in the loss of 322 aircraft and 3,500 men. They were forced to withdraw from the area before attempting even a landing on the island they sought to conquer.
... History.com

I was hoping to find a model of the Yorktown.  I rarely get to post ship models.  But my search for 'Yorktown' led me to two models on Ecardmodels:  Grumman Hellcat in Yorktown livery and the Nakajima B5N1 which took part in disabling the Yorktown.

You can find them at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/catalogsearch/result/?q=yorktown
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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2017, 01:10:45 PM »
June 5, 1944  D-Day Paratroopers Take Off





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Beginning in the late evening, 821 C-47 Skytrain twin-engine transports and 516 Waco and Horsa gliders of the IXth Troop Carrier Command airlifted 13,348 paratroopers of the 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions, United States Army, and another 7,900 men of the British Army 6th Airborne Division and the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion.

The airplanes flew in a Vee-of Vees formation, nine airplanes abreast, 100 feet from wing tip to wing tip, 1,000 feet in trail, stretching for over 300 miles. They flew in darkness at an altitude of 500 to 1,000 feet.

Their mission was to drop the paratroopers behind the invasion beaches of Normandy during the hours before the amphibious assault began on D-Day.
...ThisDayinAviation

You can pick up your own C-47 at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-50-c-47-skytrain-in-four-liveries.html

I almost did the Six-Day War again, http://cutandfold.info/cutandfoldforum/index.php?topic=620.msg6786#msg6786, but last fall, one of the insurance agents that I assist passed away, Howard Newman.  He was part of this necessary mess.  His group was not very close to their target when they landed, and they got caught in some winds that threw them into some cliffs instead of their drop zone.  Not very many of his group made it to the bridge that was their target.  They weren't able to destroy the bridge, but they were able to damage it to keep it from being very usable.  He ended up with a broken shoulder and leg from the cliff, but he made it.  Howard was a pain in the neck, but he will be missed.
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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2017, 02:18:02 PM »
June 6, 1944 Operation Overlord -- D-Day

Although there are many interesting events for June 6, this one has had the most effect.



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Although the term D-Day is used routinely as military lingo for the day an operation or event will take place, for many it is also synonymous with June 6, 1944, the day the Allied powers crossed the English Channel and landed on the beaches of Normandy, France, beginning the liberation of Western Europe from Nazi control during World War II. Within three months, the northern part of France would be freed and the invasion force would be preparing to enter Germany, where they would meet up with Soviet forces moving in from the east.

With Hitler's armies in control of most of mainland Europe, the Allies knew that a successful invasion of the continent was central to winning the war. Hitler knew this too, and was expecting an assault on northwestern Europe in the spring of 1944. He hoped to repel the Allies from the coast with a strong counterattack that would delay future invasion attempts, giving him time to throw the majority of his forces into defeating the Soviet Union in the east. Once that was accomplished, he believed an all-out victory would soon be his.

On the morning of June 5, 1944, U.S. General Dwight D. Eisenhower, the supreme commander of Allied forces in Europe gave the go-ahead for Operation Overlord, the largest amphibious military operation in history. On his orders, 6,000 landing craft, ships and other vessels carrying 176,000 troops began to leave England for the trip to France. That night, 822 aircraft filled with parachutists headed for drop zones in Normandy. An additional 13,000 aircraft were mobilized to provide air cover and support for the invasion.

By dawn on June 6, 18,000 parachutists were already on the ground; the land invasions began at 6:30 a.m. The British and Canadians overcame light opposition to capture Gold, Juno and Sword beaches; so did the Americans at Utah. The task was much tougher at Omaha beach, however, where 2,000 troops were lost and it was only through the tenacity and quick-wittedness of troops on the ground that the objective was achieved. By day's end, 155,000 Allied troops--Americans, British and Canadians--had successfully stormed Normandy’s beaches.

For their part, the Germans suffered from confusion in the ranks and the absence of celebrated commander Field Marshal Erwin Rommel, who was away on leave. At first, Hitler, believing that the invasion was a feint designed to distract the Germans from a coming attack north of the Seine River, refused to release nearby divisions to join the counterattack and reinforcements had to be called from further afield, causing delays. He also hesitated in calling for armored divisions to help in the defense. In addition, the Germans were hampered by effective Allied air support, which took out many key bridges and forced the Germans to take long detours, as well as efficient Allied naval support, which helped protect advancing Allied troops.

Though it did not go off exactly as planned, as later claimed by British Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery--for example, the Allies were able to land only fractions of the supplies and vehicles they had intended in France--D-Day was a decided success. By the end of June, the Allies had 850,000 men and 150,000 vehicles in Normandy and were poised to continue their march across Europe.
... History.com

In honor of the actions at the beaches, today's model is the LCM from papertigerarmaments.

https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-72-lcm-3-medium-gray-paper-model.html
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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #6 on: June 07, 2017, 11:32:52 AM »
June 7, 1917 Dean Martin Born



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Dino Paul Crocetti was born in Steubenville, Ohio.  He was an American singer, actor, comedian, and film producer.

One of the most popular and enduring American entertainers of the mid-20th century, Martin was nicknamed the "King of Cool" for his seemingly effortless charisma and self-assuredness. He was a member of the "Rat Pack" and a star in concert stage/nightclubs, recordings, motion pictures, and television. He was the host of the television variety program The Dean Martin Show (1965–1974) and The Dean Martin Celebrity Roast (1974–1985).

Martin's relaxed, warbling crooning voice earned him dozens of hit singles including his signature songs "Memories Are Made of This", "That's Amore", "Everybody Loves Somebody", "You're Nobody till Somebody Loves You", "Sway", "Volare", and "Ain't That a Kick in the Head?".
...Wikipedia

Other than the Martin and Lewis Comedies, I particularly enjoyed his Matt Helm movies.  He helped make the Thunderbird a cool car.  And he always had to have a drink handy.



You can find Dean and the other Rat Pack members at http://www.paper-toy.fr/2011/10/23/dean-martin-by-luis-renato-kriegel/


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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2017, 10:27:33 PM »
June 8, 1984 Ghostbusters Released



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On this day in 1984, the now-classic comedy Ghostbusters is released in theaters across the United States.

Produced and directed by Ivan Reitman, Ghostbusters starred Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis as disgraced parapsychology professors in New York City who turn to “paranormal investigation”–hunting down and capturing ghosts—to make money after Columbia University yanks their research grants. Suddenly overwhelmed by the demand for their services, they hire a fourth team member (Ernie Hudson) who predicts that the increased supernatural activity is building to a catastrophic Judgement Day-like scenario. His fears turn out to be right on target, and all hell breaks loose after a skeptical government official (William Atherton) pulls the plug on the ghostbusters’ containment system. Sigourney Weaver and Rick Moranis co-starred as Manhattan apartment dwellers possessed by followers of a long-dead deity, Gozer, with whom the ghostbusters must wage a climactic battle.

Aykroyd and Ramis co-wrote the script for the film, which Aykroyd had originally conceived as a vehicle for himself and John Belushi, his co-star in TV’s Saturday Night Live and The Blues Brothers (1980). Belushi died of a drug overdose in 1982, however, and the part was later rewritten extensively to accommodate the unique talents of Bill Murray, another SNL alum known for his work in Meatballs (1979), Caddyshack (1980) and Stripes (1980).

Despite its hefty $30 million production budget–an unprecedented amount for a comedy–Ghostbusters was a box-office hit by any standards, beating out Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom to become the second-highest-grossing movie of the year with $229 million, behind only Beverly Hills Cop ($235 million). It was equally well-received by critics; Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times, for one, called it “an exception to the general rule that big special effects can wreck a comedy…one of those rare movies where the original, fragile comic vision has survived a multimillion-dollar production.” Ghostbusters spawned a hit 1989 sequel, Ghostbusters II, also co-written by Aykroyd and Ramis, and two animated television series. In the fall of 2008, Variety reported that Columbia Pictures had hired writers to produce a script for a long-awaited third Ghostbusters installment.
... History.com

We'll use the Paper Replika version of Ecto-1 this time, http://paper-replika.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=9332
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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2017, 12:12:11 PM »
June 9, 1961 Michael J. Fox Born



Iconic car for an iconic movie

http://paperinside.com/delorean/
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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #9 on: June 09, 2017, 11:05:00 PM »
June 10, 1979 Paul Newman Takes Second at Le Mans



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Paul Newman, the blue-eyed movie star-turned-race car driver, accomplishes the greatest feat of his racing career on this day in 1979, roaring into second place in the 47th 24 Hours of Le Mans, the famous endurance race held annually in Le Mans, France.

Newman emerged as one of Hollywood’s top leading men in the 1960s, with acclaimed performances in such films as “The Hustler” (1961), “Cool Hand Luke” (1967) and “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” (1969). Also in 1969, he starred in “Winning” as a struggling race car driver who must redeem his career and win the heart of the woman he loves–played by Newman’s real-life wife, Joanne Woodward–at the Indianapolis 500. To prepare for the movie, Newman attended racing school, and he performed many of the high-speed racing scenes in the movie himself, without a stunt double. In 1972, Newman began his own racing career, winning his first Sports Club Car of America (SCCA) race driving a Lotus Elan. He soon moved up to a series of Datsun racing sedans and won four SCCA national championships from 1979 to 1986.

Newman’s high point at the track came in June 1979 at Le Mans, where he raced a Porsche 935 twin-turbo coupe on a three-man team with Dick Barbour and Rolf Stommelen. His team finished second; first place went to two brothers from Florida, Don and Bill Whittington, and their teammate, Klaus Ludwig. Drama ensued during the last two hours of the race, when the Whittingtons’ car–also a Porsche 935–was sidelined with fuel-injection problems and it looked like Newman’s team could overtake them to grab the win. In the end, however, they had trouble even clinching second due to a dying engine. The Whittington team covered 2,592.1 miles at an average speed of 107.99 mph, finishing 59 miles ahead of Newman, Barbour and Stommelen.

After the race, The New York Times quoted the 54-year-old Newman as saying he might not race at Le Mans again: “I’m getting a bit long in the tooth for this. And my racing here places an unfortunate emphasis on the team. It takes it away from the people who really do the work.” In fact, he continued racing into his eighties, making his last start at the Rolex 24 at Daytona International Speedway in 2006. He also found success as a race car owner, forming a team with Carl Haas that became one of the most enduring in Indy car racing. Newman died in September 2008 at the age of 83.
... History.com

Okay, I know several folks would like to have a paper model of this car (hint, hint), but I've had no luck in finding it.  Dave does have Steve McQueen's Porsche from the Le Mans movie, though.  You can find it at http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/showrodz.html#RACERZ

If we had Newman's Porsche, it could be a set of Actor/Driver Le Mans Porsche's.
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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2017, 09:35:17 AM »
June 11, 1926 Ford Trimotor First Flight



Quote
The Ford 4-AT-A Trimotor, serial number 4-AT-1, flew for the first time at Dearborn, Michigan. It was registered NC2435.

Designed as a commercial passenger transport, the Ford Trimotor could carry up to 8 passengers in a completely enclosed cabin, and had a crew of 3.  A distinctive feature of its construction was the corrugated metal skin which was used to provide strength and rigidity. Changes came quickly and no two of the early Trimotors were alike. The second variant, the 4-AT-B, was 49 feet, 10 inches (15.189 meters) long with a wingspan of 74 feet (22.555 meters) and height of 12 feet, 8 inches (3.861 meters). It had an empty weight of 6,169 pounds (2,798.2 kilograms) and gross weight of 10,130 pounds (4,594.9 kilograms). The 4-AT-A was powered by three 787.4-cubic-inch-displacement (12.9 liter) air-cooled Wright R-790 J-4 Whirlwind 9-cylinder radial engines producing 200 h.p. each and turning two-bladed propellers, while the 4-AT-B had completely redesigned Wright J-5 Whirlwind engines which produced 220 horsepower. The Trimotor 4-AT-B could cruise at 95 miles per hour (152.9 kilometers per hour) and it’s maximum speed was 114 miles per hour (183.5 kilometers per hour). It’s service ceiling was 12,000 feet (3,657.6 meters) and it had a range of 530 miles (852.9 kilometers).

This airplane was very popular at the time and was the foundation for many commercial airlines.  Several were also in military service. Between 1926 and 1933, Ford built 199 Trimotors. Though advances in aeronautics quickly made the Trimotor obsolete, its ruggedness and simplicity kept it in service around the world for decades.

The very first Ford Trimotor was operated by Ford’s airline, Ford Air Transport Service. It was re-registered NC1492. At 8:45 a.m., 12 May 1928, 4-AT-1 stalled on takeoff at Dearborn. The airliner crashed and caught fire. Pilots William Munn and E.K. Parker were killed.
... This Day in Aviation

For the model, you can pick up Peter Zorn's Tri-motor at http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/vbdownloads.php?do=download&downloadid=927
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