Author Topic: June (2017)  (Read 729 times)

Vermin King

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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #11 on: June 12, 2017, 10:08:14 AM »
June 12, 1987 'Tear Down This Wall' Speech



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On this day in 1987, in one of his most famous Cold War speeches, President Ronald Reagan challenges Soviet Leader Mikhail Gorbachev to “tear down” the Berlin Wall, a symbol of the repressive Communist era in a divided Germany.

In 1945, following Germany’s defeat in World War II, the nation’s capital, Berlin, was divided into four sections, with the Americans, British and French controlling the western region and the Soviets gaining power in the eastern region. In May 1949, the three western sections came together as the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany), with the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) being established in October of that same year. In 1952, the border between the two countries was closed and by the following year East Germans were prosecuted if they left their country without permission. In August 1961, the Berlin Wall was erected by the East German government to prevent its citizens from escaping to the West. Between 1949 and the wall’s inception, it’s estimated that over 2.5 million East Germans fled to the West in search of a less repressive life.

With the wall as a backdrop, President Reagan declared to a West Berlin crowd in 1987, “There is one sign the Soviets can make that would be unmistakable, that would advance dramatically the cause of freedom and peace.” He then called upon his Soviet counterpart: “Secretary General Gorbachev, if you seek peace–if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe–if you seek liberalization: come here, to this gate. Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate. Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall.” Reagan then went on to ask Gorbachev to undertake serious arms reduction talks with the United States.

Most listeners at the time viewed Reagan’s speech as a dramatic appeal to Gorbachev to renew negotiations on nuclear arms reductions. It was also a reminder that despite the Soviet leader’s public statements about a new relationship with the West, the U.S. wanted to see action taken to lessen Cold War tensions. Happily for Berliners, though, the speech also foreshadowed events to come: Two years later, on November 9, 1989, joyful East and West Germans did break down the infamous barrier between East and West Berlin. Germany was officially reunited on October 3, 1990.

Gorbachev, who had been in office since 1985, stepped down from his post as Soviet leader in 1991. Reagan, who served two terms as president, from 1981 to 1989, died on June 5, 2004, at age 93.
... History.com

You can get Bryan Tan's Berlin Wall Section at http://rocketmantan.deviantart.com/art/Berlin-Wall-Papercraft-275462938
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Dave Winfield

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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #12 on: June 12, 2017, 11:35:51 PM »

Okay, I know several folks would like to have a paper model of this car (hint, hint), but I've had no luck in finding it.
 Dave does have Steve McQueen's Porsche from the Le Mans movie, though.  You can find it at http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/showrodz.html#RACERZ

If we had Newman's Porsche, it could be a set of Actor/Driver Le Mans Porsche's.

I agree...and it would be of interest to me too, since I am such a big Porsche fan.
Not sure why I have not looked at this car.
I will definitely do a bit of research, and put it on my to-do list.
No promises (timewise) though.

1979 Porsche 935 SOLD $4,840,000: http://www.goodingco.com/vehicle/1979-porsche-935/
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Vermin King

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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #13 on: June 13, 2017, 08:50:55 AM »
Oo, doggies, that 1979 would have been a great investment in 1979
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Vermin King

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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #14 on: June 13, 2017, 12:10:12 PM »
June 13, 1381, Peasant Army Marches on London



Quote
During the Peasants’ Revolt, a large mob of English peasants led by Wat Tyler marches into London and begins burning and looting the city. Several government buildings were destroyed, prisoners were released, and a judge was beheaded along with several dozen other leading citizens.

The Peasants’ Revolt had its origins in a severe manifestation of bubonic plague in the late 1340s, which killed nearly a third of the population of England. The scarcity of labor brought on by the Black Death led to higher wages and a more mobile peasantry. Parliament, however, resisted these changes to its traditional feudal system and passed laws to hold down wages while encouraging landlords to reassert their ancient manorial rights. In 1380, peasant discontent reached a breaking point when Parliament restricted voting rights through an increase of the poll tax, and the Peasants’ Revolt began.

In Kent, a county in southeast England, the rebels chose Wat Tyler as their leader, and he led his growing “army” toward London, capturing the towns of Maidstone, Rochester, and Canterbury along the way. After he was denied a meeting with King Richard II, he led the rebels into London on June 13, 1381, burning and plundering the city. The next day, the 14-year-old king met with peasant leaders at Mile End and agreed to their demands to abolish serfdom and restrictions on the marketplace. However, fighting continued elsewhere at the same time, and Tyler led a peasant force against the Tower of London, capturing the fortress and executing the archbishop of Canterbury.

On June 15, the king met Tyler at Smithfield, and Tyler presented new demands, including one calling for the abolishment of church property. During the meeting, the mayor of London, angered at Tyler’s arrogance in the presence of the king, lunged at the rebel leader with a sword, fatally wounding him. As Tyler lay dying on the ground, Richard managed to keep the peasant mob calm until the mayor returned with armed troops. Hundreds of rebels were executed and the rest dispersed. During the next few days, the Peasant Revolt was put down with severity all across England, and Richard revoked all the concessions he had made to the peasants at Mile End. For several weeks, Wat Tyler’s head was displayed on a pole in a London field.
... History.com

I never knew that the Tower of London was ever out of the Crown's control until last year.  As this was something new to me, I did a little more research, and depending on your political views, this is either a huge turning point, or just a sad state of events.  After the Black Death, as many as 50% of the population died.  The Lords had all this land with less people to work it.  Not only were laws passed to return wages to pre-plague levels, they even passed a law that made it illegal to turn down work, even if you already had employment.  I'm just thankful I didn't live back then

For the model, let's go to Canon, http://cp.c-ij.com/jp/contents/CNT-0011749/index.html
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Vermin King

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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #15 on: June 14, 2017, 12:54:10 PM »
June 14, 1846 Bear Flag Revolt



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Anticipating the outbreak of war with Mexico, American settlers in California rebel against the Mexican government and proclaim the short-lived California Republic.

The political situation in California was tense in 1846. Though nominally controlled by Mexico, California was home to only a relatively small number of Mexican settlers. Former citizens of the United States made up the largest segment of the California population, and their numbers were quickly growing. Mexican leaders worried that many American settlers were not truly interested in becoming Mexican subjects and would soon push for annexation of California to the United States. For their part, the Americans distrusted their Mexican leaders. When rumors of an impending war between the U.S. and Mexico reached California, many Americans feared the Mexicans might make a preemptive attack to forestall rebellion.

In the spring of 1846, the American army officer and explorer John C. Fremont arrived at Sutter’s Fort (near modern-day Sacramento) with a small corps of soldiers. Whether or not Fremont had been specifically ordered to encourage an American rebellion is unclear. Ostensibly, Fremont and his men were in the area strictly for the purposes of making a scientific survey. The brash young officer, however, began to persuade a motley mix of American settlers and adventurers to form militias and prepare for a rebellion against Mexico.

Emboldened by Fremont’s encouragement, on this day in 1846 a party of 33 Americans under the leadership of Ezekiel Merritt and William Ide invaded the largely defenseless Mexican outpost of Sonoma just north of San Francisco. Fremont and his soldiers did not participate, though he had given his tacit approval of the attack. Merritt and his men surrounded the home of the retired Mexican general, Mariano Vallejo, and informed him that he was a prisoner of war. Vallejo, who was actually a strong supporter of American annexation, was more puzzled than alarmed by the rebels. He invited Merritt and a few of the other men into his home to discuss the situation over brandy. After several hours passed, Ide went in and spoiled what had turned into pleasant chat by arresting Vallejo and his family.

Having won a bloodless victory at Sonoma, Merritt and Ide then proceeded to declare California an independent republic. With a cotton sheet and some red paint, they constructed a makeshift flag with a crude drawing of a grizzly bear, a lone red star (a reference to the earlier Lone Star Republic of Texas), and the words “California Republic” at the bottom. From then on, the independence movement was known as the Bear Flag Revolt.

After the rebels won a few minor skirmishes with Mexican forces, Fremont officially took command of the “Bear Flaggers” and occupied the unguarded presidio of San Francisco on July 1. Six days later, Fremont learned that American forces under Commodore John D. Sloat had taken Monterey without a fight and officially raised the American flag over California. Since the ultimate goal of the Bear Flaggers was to make California part of the U.S., they now saw little reason to preserve their “government.” Three weeks after it had been proclaimed, the California Republic quietly faded away. Ironically, the Bear Flag itself proved far more enduring than the republic it represented: it became the official state flag when California joined the union in 1850.
... History.com

You can find a mirror image of General Vallejo's home at http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/buildings/homestd.html

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Vermin King

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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #16 on: June 15, 2017, 11:37:01 AM »
June 15, 1986 Richard Petty's 1000th Start



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On this day in 1986, driving legend Richard Petty makes the 1,000th start of his National Association for Stock Car Racing (NASCAR) career, in the Miller American 400 in Brooklyn, Michigan. He became the first driver in NASCAR history to log 1,000 career starts.

Petty grew up on the NASCAR circuit: His father was Hall of Fame driver Lee Petty, one of stock car racing’s pioneers and a three-time winner of the Grand National championship in the 1950s. At the age of 12, young Richard became his father’s crew chief, but he was not allowed to drive until 1958, when he turned 21. Richard and Lee Petty both raced in the inaugural Daytona 500 the following year; Lee won the event, while Richard’s engine blew after only eight laps. By the late 1960s, however, Richard Petty had become the dominant figure in stock car racing. He won his first Daytona 500 in 1964, two years after his father was knocked out of racing after a near-fatal crash. In 1967, Petty won 27 of the 48 races he started–including a record 10 straight victories–and finished in the top five of 11 others to capture the Grand National title for a second time.

During the 1970s, Petty won five Winston Cups and four Daytona 500s, and was known for his fierce rivalry with the driver David Pearson, who edged Petty out after a collision in the last lap at Daytona in 1976. Ulcers caused Petty to have 40 percent of his stomach removed in late 1978; he came back to win another Daytona 500 two months later. He scored his last career victory–his 200th–at the Firecracker 400 in 1984, two days after his 47th birthday.

On June 15, 1986, at the Michigan International Speedway, Bill Elliott beat Harry Gant (who had come back from serious injuries after a crash a week earlier) to win the Miller American 400. The race will go down in history, however, as Richard Petty’s 1000th career start. (Some controversy exists as to whether the race was his 1,000th or 999th career start, due to varied record keeping and statistics procedures over the years.)

Dubbed “The King,” the enormously popular Petty retired in 1992, having racked up a dominant list of records including first all-time in wins (200), races started (1,184), top-five finishes (555), top-10 finishes (712), pole positions (126), laps completed (307,836), laps led (52,194), races led (599), and consecutive races won (10).
...History.com

Shoot!  Wasn't even able to identify any photos of the car he drove in that race.  So for the model, I'm going with the movie 'Cars' tribute to the King from Webdude's archive, https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0By3a5MPIUqbOczZzVmF4SFlIQm8&usp=sharing&tid=0By3a5MPIUqbOejhGUHc0dkdOMUk

And, yes, that is from his archive posted on PM.com a year or so ago, so it isn't pirated.  The pirated versions are easier to locate, unless you know where to look...
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Dave Winfield

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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #17 on: June 15, 2017, 11:53:23 AM »
The car is the "aero Grand Prix".
Basically just a 86 Pontiac Grand prix with a bubbled rear glass.
It was a production car, but maybe only for that year? I don't know.
I never saw one in my shop, but they were not uncommon in Ontario (Canada).
Not sure I've ever seen a model of it though.
A Grand Prix stocker could easily be modified.

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Vermin King

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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #18 on: June 16, 2017, 09:30:10 AM »
Jun 16, 1858 Lincoln's House Divided Speech



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On June 16, 1858, more than 1,000 Republican delegates met in the Springfield, Illinois, statehouse for the Republican State Convention. At 5:00 p.m. they chose Abraham Lincoln as their candidate for the U.S. Senate, running against Democrat Stephen A. Douglas. At 8:00 p.m. Lincoln delivered this address to his Republican colleagues in the Hall of Representatives. The title reflects part of the speech's introduction, "A house divided against itself cannot stand," a concept familiar to Lincoln's audience as a statement by Jesus recorded in all three synoptic gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke).

 Even Lincoln's friends regarded the speech as too radical for the occasion. His law partner, William H. Herndon, believed Lincoln was morally courageous but politically incorrect. Lincoln read the speech to him before delivering it, referring to the "house divided" language this way: "The proposition is indisputably true ... and I will deliver it as written. I want to use some universally known figure, expressed in simple language as universally known, that it may strike home to the minds of men in order to rouse them to the peril of the times."

 Reflecting on it several years later, Herndon said, "Through logic inductively seen, Lincoln as a statesman, and political philosopher, announced an eternal truth -- not only as broad as America, but covers the world."

 Another lawyer, Leonard Swett, said the speech defeated Lincoln in the Senate campaign. In 1866 he wrote to Herndon complaining, "Nothing could have been more unfortunate or inappropriate; it was saying first the wrong thing, yet he saw it was an abstract truth, but standing by the speech would ultimately find him in the right place."
...abrahamlincolnonline.org

You can find your own Illinois Statehouse at https://www2.illinois.gov/ihpa/Preserve/Pages/construct_OSC.aspx
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Vermin King

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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #19 on: June 16, 2017, 02:15:40 PM »
June 17, 1898  Maurits Cornelius Escher Born



MC Escher has been my favorite artist for as long as I can remember.  His woodcuts and drawings definitely represent an expanding of one's senses.

There are a number of paper models out there showing his illusions and his interlocking forms, there are also several that use his artwork in different forms, but this one seems to me to be the best tribute to his work.  Done by Bryan Peele, it honors the lithograph Relativity from 1953.  You can find it here:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/crackpotcreative/2714678437/in/photostream/

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Vermin King

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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #20 on: June 16, 2017, 03:01:57 PM »
June 18, 1812 War of 1812 Begins



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The day after the Senate followed the House of Representatives in voting to declare war against Great Britain, President James Madison signs the declaration into law–and the War of 1812 begins. The American war declaration, opposed by a sizable minority in Congress, had been called in response to the British economic blockade of France, the induction of American seaman into the British Royal Navy against their will, and the British support of hostile Indian tribes along the Great Lakes frontier. A faction of Congress known as the “War Hawks” had been advocating war with Britain for several years and had not hidden their hopes that a U.S. invasion of Canada might result in significant territorial land gains for the United States.

In the months after President Madison proclaimed the state of war to be in effect, American forces launched a three-point invasion of Canada, all of which were decisively unsuccessful. In 1814, with Napoleon Bonaparte’s French Empire collapsing, the British were able to allocate more military resources to the American war, and Washington, D.C., fell to the British in August. In Washington, British troops burned the White House, the Capitol, and other buildings in retaliation for the earlier burning of government buildings in Canada by U.S. soldiers.

In September, the tide of the war turned when Thomas Macdonough’s American naval force won a decisive victory at the Battle of Plattsburg Bay on Lake Champlain. The invading British army was forced to retreat back into Canada. The American victory on Lake Champlain led to the conclusion of U.S.-British peace negotiations in Belgium, and on December 24, 1814, the Treaty of Ghent was signed, formally ending the War of 1812. By the terms of the agreement, all conquered territory was to be returned, and a commission would be established to settle the boundary of the United States and Canada.

British forces assailing the Gulf Coast were not informed of the treaty in time, and on January 8, 1815, the U.S. forces under Andrew Jackson achieved the greatest American victory of the war at the Battle of New Orleans. The American public heard of Jackson’s victory and the Treaty of Ghent at approximately the same time, fostering a greater sentiment of self-confidence and shared identity throughout the young republic.
...History.com



For the model, I'm going with the little one from papertoys, http://www.papertoys.com/white-house.htm

As a side note:

Quote
The War of 1812 was a bizarre episode in U.S. History. Both nations went into the war with few clear objectives. Neither were prepared. The campaigns are a litany of tragic, botched efforts resulting in pointless bloodshed. And in the end, everything returning to status quo ante bellum, that is, as they were prior to the war.

It raises the question, “Why did we fight?” That large topic is not the subject of this post. I’ll simply say (and perhaps will go more in depth on the matter in a future post) that the war had more to do with western territory than anything else, setting up a pattern for all U.S. wars in the 19th century. The traditional interpretation which, many of us were taught, focuses on the issue of sovereignty on the high seas and the notion of the War of 1812 as the “Second War of Independence.” This misses the point. We had our independence. Our independence was not incomplete nor was it in jeopardy. If shipping rights were the issue then why did the land campaigns focus almost exclusively on our western frontier?…But, I digress.

Back to the tornado. A curious story and almost eerie in its timing.

By the summer of 1814, two years into the war, the United States was in trouble. There had been numerous bungled attempts to invade Canada (the objective seemingly to occupy what is now eastern Ontario…though I’m not sure that objective was ever really understood or articulated by American leaders). There had been a successful campaign under Major General William Henry Harrison in Canada, but unfortunately the War Department refused to fully support it. Harrison therefore gave his resignation and his success came to nothing.

Things got worse in April 1814. Great Britain, to our advantage, had been fighting two wars at once. But when Napoleon surrendered to the Russians and was exiled to Elba, the Napoleonic Wars had, for the time being, ended. Now Great Britain could devote tens of thousands of battle-hardened veterans to the war against the United States. Thus far, we had been fighting demoralized British troops stationed in Upper Canada, many of them eager to desert. Now, grizzled men who had served under Wellington and fought against Napoleon would be invading our shores. This was a very different type of soldier. With this influx of veterans, Great Britain would finally go on the offensive.

One of the first targets in August 1814 was primarily a psychological one. Many British officers were pushing for the burning of Washington D.C. There were certainly more important strategic objectives. But there was a desire to avenge the plundering that Americans had committed in York (now Toronto) and strike a massive blow to American morale.

Landing in Benedict, Maryland on August 19, 1814, a British force of roughly 5,000 men marched towards Washington. An American force of roughly 7,000 led by Brigadier General William Winder made a largely pathetic attempt to stop the British at the Battle of Bladensburg, Maryland on August 24. I hesitate to use that word because there was some courageous fighting there on the part of some Americans. But the battle was so poorly planned, the American forces so confused, it turned into an awful rout very quickly. And the road to Washington lay wide open to the British.

Once in Washington, the British burned the White House (after sitting down to eat a large feast that Dolly Madison and her staff had prepared for cabinet members before they were all forced to flee). The War Department, the State Department, the Treasury department and many other government offices were burned. And, of course, the Capitol building, with the original Library of Congress, was destroyed.

The policy was to leave private property alone. However, the conflagration of many public buildings threatened to spread out of control. The city was in jeopardy.

The next day, August 25, as fires still raged, a massive storm hit Washington. The driving rain put out most of the fires threatening the city. Perhaps more important, the invading British were so battered and demoralized, the storm played a large role in the decision to cut short the occupation of Washington.

The storm was so fierce that it tore buildings apart, literally lifting them off their foundations. The winds uprooted trees and knocked men to the ground. A number of houses collapsed, killing the British soldiers taking shelter therein. One British officer reported seeing cannons lifted off the ground and thrown through the air. Redcoats out on the streets of Washington, trying to enforce a curfew, were forced to lie prostrate in the mud.

Based on the first hand accounts, weather historians generally agree that the storm that struck Washington on August 25, 1814 sparked one or more tornadoes. I can’t possibly imagine being one of these soldiers, completely exposed, with no choice but to cling to mother earth in the midst of a tornado.

As the storm began to subside, one of the British officers in command of the invasion emerged from his shelter and said to one of the inhabitants of Washington, “Great God, Madam, is this the kind of storm to which you are accustomed in this infernal country?!”

She responded, “No, sir, this is a special interposition of Providence to drive our enemies from the city.”

The quick-witted officer shot back, “Not so Madam. It is rather to aid your enemies in the destruction of your city.”

I don’t know about Providence. But there can be no doubt that the tornado that struck Washington that day did more to save the capital than the United States Army ever did. The fires were largely extinguished. And the British limped back to their ships.
  ... HistoricalDigression.com
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Vermin King

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Re: June (2017)
« Reply #21 on: June 19, 2017, 12:44:59 PM »
June 19, 1992 Batman Returns Opens



Okay, time to 'fess up'.  Yes, I took my son to see this on opening day.  Little did I know how dark and discombobulated this movie was going to be.  Too many stories in one movie.  We did go out and buy the missile-launching penguins and had a lot of fun with those, though.

It did result in a memorable paper model, however.



You can find Phillipe's model of the catwoman at https://web.archive.org/web/20160409053420/http://ph3dm.maquettes-papier.net/index.php?category/Maquettes-papier/Figurines/Catwoman

While there, check out his concept cars and other models

Another blog that died ... thank goodness for Wayback Machine
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