Author Topic: June (2017)  (Read 869 times)

Dave Winfield

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2585
  • Kudos 47
    • Dave's Card Creations
Re: June (2017)
« Reply #33 on: June 29, 2017, 09:02:45 AM »
In a Lotus Europa it is...but I understand your point.
I always referred to Smart cars as "half a car".
I would ask "when does the rest of the car show up?"

I have always loved the look of the Lotus Europa...but they were considered extremely dangerous
being so small and low to the ground.
With an outside roof height of only 42", you are literally sitting on the tarmac.
And I heard they were banned in some areas because they could actually get wedged under Truck chassis!

But I would still love to own one!
Now you've made me add the Europa to my KoolWheelz list!!


DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2422
  • Kudos 26
Re: June (2017)
« Reply #34 on: June 29, 2017, 09:32:11 AM »
I'd like to see that.  Frankly, working out the headlights and front fenders would get me a lot closer to the headlights and front fenders of the Bond Aston Martin project that I shelved.

Unless you'd like to pick it up... hint, hint
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2422
  • Kudos 26
Re: June (2017)
« Reply #35 on: June 29, 2017, 02:36:21 PM »
June 29, 1613 Globe Theatre Burns



Quote
The Globe Theater, where most of Shakespeare’s plays debuted, burned down on this day in 1613.

The Globe was built by Shakespeare’s acting company, the Lord Chamberlain’s Men, in 1599 from the timbers of London’s very first permanent theater, Burbage’s Theater, built in 1576. Before James Burbage built his theater, plays and dramatic performances were ad hoc affairs, performed on street corners and in the yards of inns. However, the Common Council of London, in 1574, started licensing theatrical pieces performed in inn yards within the city limits. To escape the restriction, actor James Burbage built his own theater on land he leased outside the city limits. When Burbage’s lease ran out, the Lord Chamberlain’s men moved the timbers to a new location and created the Globe. Like other theaters of its time, the Globe was a round wooden structure with a stage at one end, and covered balconies for the gentry. The galleries could seat about 1,000 people, with room for another 2,000 “groundlings,” who could stand on the ground around the stage.

The Lord Chamberlain’s men built Blackfriars theater in 1608, a smaller theater that seated about 700 people, to use in winter when the open-air Globe wasn’t practical.
... History.com

The Papertoys version of the Globe is easy and attractive, you can find it at http://www.papertoys.com/globe.htm

Okay, we all 'know' what the Globe looked like from the reconstruction in London and illustrations done within the last 100 years, but why don't they look like illustrations done before and after the fire?


They all show the Globe being taller than wide, and a lot more windows.  Of course, if you built something like that, no one would know what it was.

That map is very interesting to me.  Look how close the Globe was to London Bridge and the Tower of London
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Dave Winfield

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2585
  • Kudos 47
    • Dave's Card Creations
Re: June (2017)
« Reply #36 on: June 29, 2017, 03:27:00 PM »
What Bond Aston Martin project??!

Do I know about this?

Tell me/show me more!  (in another thread?)


I won't show you this then: http://cutandfold.info/cutandfoldforum/index.php?topic=8.msg7741#new

DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2422
  • Kudos 26
Re: June (2017)
« Reply #37 on: June 29, 2017, 05:52:42 PM »
It actually didn't get very far.  The hood/fender/lights/grill geometry would always get messed up.  I'd fix something and mess up two others
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Burning Beard

  • Verified Member
  • *
  • Posts: 81
  • Kudos 5
Re: June (2017)
« Reply #38 on: June 29, 2017, 06:12:59 PM »
A Smart car is positively tall compared to my old Bugeye. 

Beard

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2422
  • Kudos 26
Re: June (2017)
« Reply #39 on: June 29, 2017, 09:34:04 PM »
June 30, 1894 Tower Bridge Opens



Quote
In the second half of the 19th century, an advertisement in the East End of London led to a hiring for a new river crossing downstream of London Bridge. A traditional fixed bridge at street level could not be built because it would cut off access by sailing ships to the port facilities in the Pool of London, between London Bridge and the Tower of London.

A Special Bridge or Subway Committee was formed in 1877, chaired by Sir Albert Joseph Altman, to find a solution to the river crossing problem. It opened the design of the crossing to public competition.[citation needed] Over 50 designs were submitted, including one from civil engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette. Bazalgette's design was rejected because of a lack of sufficient headroom, and design was not approved until 1884, when it was decided to build a bascule bridge.Sir John Wolfe Barry was appointed engineer with Sir Horace Jones as architect (who was also one of the judges). An Act of Parliament was passed in 1885 authorising the bridge's construction. It specified the opening span must give a clear width of 61 metres (200 ft) and a headroom of 41 metres (135 ft). Construction had to be in a Gothic style.

Barry designed a bascule bridge with two bridge towers built on piers. The central span was split into two equal bascules or leaves, which could be raised to allow river traffic to pass. The two side-spans were suspension bridges, with the suspension rods anchored both at the abutments and through rods contained within the bridge's upper walkways.

Construction started in 1886 and took eight years with five major contractors – Sir John Jackson (foundations), Baron Armstrong (hydraulics), William Webster, Sir H.H. Bartlett, and Sir William Arrol & Co. – and employed 432 construction workers. E W Crutwell was the resident engineer for the construction.

Two massive piers, containing over 70,000 tons of concrete, were sunk into the riverbed to support the construction. Over 11,000 tons of steel provided the framework for the towers and walkways. This was then clad in Cornish granite and Portland stone, both to protect the underlying steelwork and to give the bridge a pleasing appearance.

Jones died in 1886 and George D. Stevenson took over the project. Stevenson replaced Jones's original brick façade with the more ornate Victorian Gothic style, which makes the bridge a distinctive landmark, and was intended to harmonise the bridge with the nearby Tower of London. The total cost of construction was £1,184,000 (equivalent to £122 million in 2015).

The bridge was officially opened on 30 June 1894 by The Prince of Wales (the future King Edward VII), and his wife, The Princess of Wales (Alexandra of Denmark).

The bridge connected Iron Gate, on the north bank of the river, with Horselydown Lane, on the south – now known as Tower Bridge Approach and Tower Bridge Road, respectively. Until the bridge was opened, the Tower Subway – 400 m to the west – was the shortest way to cross the river from Tower Hill to Tooley Street in Southwark. Opened in 1870, Tower Subway was among the world's earliest underground ("tube") railways, but it closed after just three months and was re-opened as a pedestrian foot tunnel. Once Tower Bridge was open, the majority of foot traffic transferred to using the bridge, there being no toll to pay to use it. Having lost most of its income, the tunnel was closed in 1898.

The high-level open air walkways between the towers gained an unpleasant reputation as a haunt for prostitutes and pickpockets; as they were only accessible by stairs they were seldom used by regular pedestrians, and were closed in 1910.
...Wikipedia

Going with the big Canon model, http://cp.c-ij.com/en/contents/CNT-0009944/index.html
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

madbrit

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 9
  • Kudos 1
Re: June 30, Tower Bridge
« Reply #40 on: June 30, 2017, 01:23:07 AM »
The walkways are now enclosed and , when I was last there, had an exhibition on the history of The Bridge. I don't recall using an elevator so , if memory serves, it was a long trek up late Victorian iron stairs.

Derek