Author Topic: July (2017)  (Read 668 times)

Vermin King

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July (2017)
« on: June 30, 2017, 07:55:20 PM »
July 1, 1863 Battle of Gettysburg Begins



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The largest military conflict in North American history begins this day when Union and Confederate forces collide at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The epic battle lasted three days and resulted in a retreat to Virginia by Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia.

The Lutheran Theological Seminary served Union and then Confederate soldiers as both an observation tower and field hospital during the three days battle. Brigadier General John Buford would at times watch the days action from the Seminary's cupola. Along Seminary Ridge, during the latter half of July 1st, the remaining men of the Iron Brigade attempted another stand during their fighting withdrawal from Major General Dorsey Pender's Division of Lt. General A. P. Hill's Corps. General Pender's men would contribute to spurring the Union retreat in this afternoon's fighting but the next day, a shell fragment would slash the general's leg.  He would die July 18, 1863.

Ironically, the Seminary's founder, Samuel Simon Schmucker, was a staunch abolitionist who could not have predicted the role these buildings and grounds would play in the largest battle ever fought on North American soil. He did however use the Seminary, along with hidden rooms in his own basement, as a stop on the Underground Railroad, providing temporary safety for slaves fleeing bondage. Union soldiers destroyed anti-slavery materials found there to avoid their falling into Confederate hands. For two months after this horrific battle, soldiers from North and South attempted to recover within the sturdy walls of the Seminary now turned hospital.
...History.com



You can find a model of the seminary at http://gamerarchitect.blogspot.com/2011/12/paper-building-15mm-acw-gattysburg.html

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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2017, 08:15:12 PM »
July 2, 1943 First Tuskegee Airman Shoots Down Enemy Plane



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1st Lieutenant Charles B. Hall, USAAF, 99th Fighter Squadron, was the first of the famous “Tuskegee Airman” to shoot down an enemy airplane during World War II. At the time the 99th was based at El Haouaria Airfield in Tunisia and was patrolling the coast of Sicily. The squadron’s primary mission was ground attack.

On 2 July, however, they were escorting North American B-25 Mitchell medium bombers near Castelventrano, Italy. Enemy fighters intercepted the flight.

“It was my eighth mission and the first time I had seen the enemy close enough to shoot him. I saw two Focke-Wulfs following the bombers just after the bombs were dropped. I headed for the space between the fighters and bombers and managed to turn inside the Jerries. I fired a long burst and saw my tracers penetrate the second aircraft. He was turning to the left, but suddenly fell off and headed straight into the ground. I followed him down and saw him crash. He raised a big cloud of dust.”

Charles Hall was flying a Curtiss P-40L Warhawk, a variant of the famous fighter that was produced in limited numbers.
...ThisDayinAviation

Where there are a lot of P-40 models out there, I am not finding this variant.  If you would like to build a P-40, you can find one at http://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/catalogsearch/result/index/?p=5&q=curtiss+p+40&x=10&y=14, or http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/aircraft/Curtiss-P40-Warhawk.html

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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2017, 08:27:48 PM »
July 3, 1915 First Intentional Loop and Stall



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At San Diego, California, Lieutenant Byron Quinby Jones, Signal Corps, United States Army, intentionally executed a loop and a stall from which he successfully recovered, the first Army pilot to do so.
... This Day in Aviation

According to Wikipedia, he was also the first to execute a tail spin later that year.  In both of these exercises, he used a Curtiss J.

I find it very interesting to see this guy's story and how he fit in with the development of the use of aircraft in the military.  Interesting guy that I'd never heard of.  You can find a brief synopsis at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byron_Q._Jones.

For the model, I'll go with the Curtiss J from Fiddlers Green, http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/aircraft/Curtiss-MailJenny.html
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2017, 08:29:11 PM »
July 4, 1776  The United States Declare Their Independence

I'm in a bit of a hurry as I am heading out of town for the long weekend, so today's model is Gary Dare's Fourth of July P-51 from Fiddlers Green.



You can find it at http://cardmodelers.net/models/july4th/july4th-p51.html

See you again Tuesday
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2017, 11:39:13 AM »
July 5, 1927 FAI Altitude Record


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Less than one year after learning to fly an airplane, Lady Bailey, with Mrs. Geoffrey de Havilland (the former Miss Louise Thomas) as a passenger, took off from the de Havilland airfield at Stag Lane, Edgeware, London, England, and climbed to an altitude of 5,268 meters (17,283 feet) setting a Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) World Record for multi-place light aircraft. (Mrs. de Havilland is listed as “crew” in the FAI record.)

Lady Bailey was flying Captain Geoffrey de Havilland’s personal airplane, a DH.60X Moth, construction number 276, registration G-EBQH.

FAI Record File Num #8221 [Direct Link]
 Status: ratified – superseded since approved
 Region: World
 Class: C (Powered Aeroplanes)
 Sub-Class: C 1st category 1927-1931 (Multiplaces < 400 kg, Light Landplane)
 Category: General
 Group: Not applicable
 Type of record: Altitude
 Performance: 5 268 m
 Date: 1927-07-05
 Course/Location: Edgware (UK)
 Claimant The Hon. Bailey (GBR)
 Crew Mrs G. DE HAVILLAND
 Aeroplane: De Havilland DH Moth
 Engine: 1 Cirrus Engines Cirrus II

Lady Bailey was born Mary Westenra, daughter of the 5th Baron Rossmore. She married Sir Abe Bailey at the age of 20. Soon after becoming a licensed pilot in early 1927, she flew across the Irish Sea, the first woman to do so. After her World Record altitude flight, she set several long distance solo flight records, including an 8,000-mile flight from Croydon, South London to Cape Town, South Africa with a DH.60 Cirrus II Moth, G-EBSF, and an 18,000-mile return flight made with another DH.60 (after G-EBSF was damaged). These were the longest solo flight and the longest flight by a woman to that time.

Lady Bailey was twice awarded the Harmon Trophy. In 1930, she was created Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire. During World War II, The Hon. Dame Mary Bailey, DBE, served with the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force with the rank Section Officer. She died 29 July 1960 at the age of 70.

G-EBQH was a prototype for the de Havilland DH.60 Cirrus II Moth, and was powered by an air-cooled, normally-aspirated 304.66-cubic-inch-displacement (4.993 liter) A.D.C. Cirrus Mark II four-cylinder vertical inline engine. This was a right-hand tractor, direct-drive, overhead-valve engine with two valves per cylinder and a compression ratio of 4.9:1. It had a normal power rating of 75 horsepower at 1,800 r.p.m. and a maximum power rating of 80 horsepower at 2,000 r.p.m. It drove a two-bladed, fixed-pitch propeller. The Cirrus Mk.II was 3 feet, 9.3 inches (1.151 meters) long, 1 foot, 7 inches wide (0.483 meters) and 2 feet, 11.6 inches (0.904 meters) high. It weighed 280 pounds (127 kilograms).

G-EBQH was used as a factory demonstrator and test aircraft. The DH.60X crashed in February 1928 but was rebuilt and later sold. It was flown in the King’s Cup Air Races of 1927, 1928 and 1929 by Alan S. Butler, the chairman of de Havilland. The prototype was modified to a single-place configuration with a Cirrus Mark III engine, and was known as the Moth Special. In the 1929 race, it set the fastest time for a light aircraft.

Records indicate that G-EBQH changed ownership a number of times. Its Certificate of Airworthiness expired in 1937 and its status is not known.
...This Day in Aviation



For the model, https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-48-d-h-60-cirrus-moth-g-eblv.html
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2017, 11:41:21 AM »
July 6, 1946 Sylvester Stallone Born



And, of course, My three favorite models from Judge Dredd are by Jan Rukr, http://aliens.humlak.cz/aliens/aliens_papirove_modely/bonus-lawgiver_gb.html

The 1:1 Lawgiver, a badge and the Book of Law


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Dave Winfield

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2017, 06:18:02 PM »
Nice gun!!!
I might just try to build this.

I wonder if Jan would like to try designing Deckard's Blaster from Blade Runner?
Uhu's model is stupidly difficult with no instructions.
I'd like one that is buildable.
DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!

Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2017, 07:48:13 PM »
You never know.  Since he had a kid, he doesn't seem to have as much time for design, and he seems to like doing the larger projects, though
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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2017, 12:41:38 PM »
July 7, 1946 XF-11 First Flight



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At the Hughes Aircraft Company’s private airport, Culver City, California, the first of two prototype XF-11 photographic reconnaissance airplanes took of on its first flight. In the cockpit was Howard Robard Hughes, Jr.

The Hughes XF-11 was designed to be flown by a pilot and a navigator/photographer. Its configuration was similar to the Lockheed P-38 Lightning and Northrop P-61 Black Widow, as well as the earlier Hughes D-2. The prototype was 65 feet, 5 inches (19.939 meters) long with a wingspan of 101 feet, 4 inches (30.886 meters) and height of 23 feet, 2 inches (7.061 meters). The empty weight was 37,100 pounds (16,828.3 kilograms) and maximum takeoff weight was 58,300 pounds (26,444.4 kilograms). The XF-11 was powered by two 4,362.5 cubic-inch-displacement (71.489 liter) Pratt and Whitney R-4360-31 Wasp Major air-cooled, supercharged 28-cylinder four-row radial engines producing 3,000 horsepower, each. The engines drove a pair of counter-rotating four-bladed propellers. The planned maximum speed was 450 miles per hour (724.2 kilometers per hour), service ceiling 44,000 feet (13,411.2 meters) and planned range was 5,000 miles (8,046.7 kilometers).

After about an hour of flight, a hydraulic fluid leak caused the rear propeller of the right engine to go into reverse pitch. Rather than shutting the engine down and feathering the propellers to reduce aerodynamic drag, Hughes maintained full power on the right engine but reduced power on the left, attempting to limit adverse yaw to the right side.

Unable to make it back to the Culver City airport, Hughes planned to land at the Los Angeles Country Club. At 7:20 p.m., the airplane crashed into three houses on North Whittier Drive, Beverly Hills, California. The fire destroyed the prototype and one of the houses and heavily damaged the others. Howard Hughes was seriously injured in the crash.


The investigating board criticized Hughes for not following the flight test plan, staying airborne too long, and deviating from a number of standard test flight protocols. The cause of the actual crash was determined to be pilot error.

A second XF-11 was completed and flew in April 1947, again with Hughes in the cockpit. The project was cancelled however, in favor of the Northrop F-15 Reporter and Boeing RB-50 Superfortress, which were reconnaissance aircraft based on existing combat models already in production.
... This Day in Aviation

You can get Tekzo's model of the XF-11 at http://myhobbycraft.blogspot.com/2009/10/xr-11-1100.html
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2017, 01:34:59 PM »
July 8, 1980 Prototype F-15 Strike Eagle First Flight



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The prototype McDonnell Douglas F-15 Strike Eagle, a fighter-bomber variant converted from the second two-seat F-15B Eagle trainer, F-15B-4-MC 71-0291, made its first flight.

The Strike Eagle was begun as a private venture by McDonnell Douglas. Designed to be operated by a pilot and a weapons system officer (WSO), the airplane can carry bombs, missiles and guns for a ground attack role, while maintaining its capability as an air superiority fighter.
... This Day in Aviation History

I really like that European 1 livery, but if you want it, you are going to have to get out a paint program.  Actually, I couldn't find many F-15's, and most of those were in Japanese colors and only one F-15E.  So here's a link to an F-15E, and let's see who can mod this up.  http://paper-replika.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=5906:f-15e-idolmaster-chihaya-kisaragi-papercraft&catid=132:aircraft&Itemid=206833

I wonder why the forum software no longer resizes images ...
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #10 on: July 09, 2017, 02:12:58 PM »
July 9, 1956 Tom Hanks Born



"Houston we have a problem"

Apollo 13 is one of my favorite movies that I haven't seen in a long, long time.

Several versions of Ton's Apollo Service and Command Modules can be found at Lower Hudson Valley, http://jleslie48.com/gallery_models_apollo.html

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