Author Topic: July (2017)  (Read 671 times)

Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2017, 03:32:38 PM »
July 10, 1940  Battle of Britain Begins



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The Battle of Britain (German: Luftschlacht um England, literally "Air battle for England") is the name given to the Second World War air campaign waged by the German Air Force (Luftwaffe) against the United Kingdom during the summer and autumn of 1940. The name is derived from a famous speech delivered by Prime Minister Winston Churchill in the House of Commons: "... the Battle of France is over. I expect that the Battle of Britain is about to begin."

After the occupation of France by Germany, Britain knew it was only a matter of time before the Axis power turned its sights across the Channel. And on July 10, 120 German bombers and fighters struck a British shipping convoy in that very Channel, while 70 more bombers attacked dockyard installations in South Wales. Although Britain had far fewer fighters than the Germans–600 to 1,300–it had a few advantages, such as an effective radar system, which made the prospects of a German sneak attack unlikely. Britain also produced superior quality aircraft. Its Spitfires could turn tighter than Germany's ME109s, enabling it to better elude pursuers; and its Hurricanes could carry 40mm cannon, and would shoot down, with its American Browning machine guns, over 1,500 Luftwaffe aircraft. The German single-engine fighters had a limited flight radius, and its bombers lacked the bomb-load capacity necessary to unleash permanent devastation on their targets. Britain also had the advantage of unified focus, while German infighting caused missteps in timing; they also suffered from poor intelligence.

But in the opening days of battle, Britain was in immediate need of two things: a collective stiff upper lip–and aluminum. A plea was made by the government to turn in all available aluminum to the Ministry of Aircraft Production. "We will turn your pots and pans into Spitfires and Hurricanes," the ministry declared. And they did.
...military.wikia.com/wiki/Battle_of_Britain

Dave has some Spits at http://www.papermodelshop.com/html/spitfire.html
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2017, 12:11:30 PM »
July 11, 1979 Skylab Crashes to Earth



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Parts of Skylab, America's first space station, come crashing down on Australia and into the Indian Ocean five years after the last manned Skylab mission ended. No one was injured.

Launched in 1973, Skylab was the world's first successful space station. The first manned Skylab mission came two years after the Soviet Union launched Salynut 1, the world's first space station, into orbit around the earth. However, unlike the ill-fated Salynut, which was plagued with problems, the American space station was a great success, safely housing three separate three-man crews for extended periods of time.

Originally the spent third stage of a Saturn 5 moon rocket, the cylindrical space station was 118 feet tall, weighed 77 tons, and carried the most varied assortment of experimental equipment ever assembled in a single spacecraft to that date. The crews of Skylab spent more than 700 hours observing the sun and brought home more than 175,000 solar pictures. They also provided important information about the biological effects of living in space for prolonged periods of time.

Five years after the last Skylab mission, the space station's orbit began to deteriorate--earlier than was anticipated--because of unexpectedly high sunspot activity. On July 11, 1979, Skylab made a spectacular return to earth, breaking up in the atmosphere and showering burning debris over the Indian Ocean and Australia.
  History.com

https://www.space.com/21122-skylab-space-station-remains-museum.html

I particularly got a kick out of the oversized check on display.  The good folks of Esperanza fined NASA for littering, and a radio station sent them a check to pay the fine that NASA ignored.

John J.'s version of Skylab can be found at http://jleslie48.com/gallery_models_apollo.html

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #13 on: July 12, 2017, 01:31:55 PM »
July 12, 2013 Dave Releases RCAF P-51C Mustang



July 12th has always been a troublesome date for history that matches up with available models.  Some time ago, I started a personal project of listing model releases by Dave and others (which is far from complete) with the goal of mixing model releases with my typical posts.  I hope that this is okay with everyone that follows these posts.

You can see Dave's original post here:  http://cutandfold.info/cutandfoldforum/index.php?topic=238.msg2671#msg2671

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #14 on: July 13, 2017, 11:51:45 AM »
July 13, 1942 Harrison Ford Born



Almost went with Cheech Marin this year, but ... Star Wars, Indiana Jones, Ender’s Game, Cowboys & Aliens, Blade Runner

Let's go with Indiana Jones this year

You can find Indiana at http://ninjatoes.wordpress.com/2007/10/31/indiana-jones/

Headpiece of the Staff of Ra is at http://tektonten.blogspot.com/2009/02/indiana-jones-papercraft-ra-staff.html

Webley Mk VI Revolver is at http://tektonten.blogspot.com/2012/01/indiana-jones-papercraft-webley-mk-vi.html

Petra Treasury is at http://papermau.blogspot.com/2012/04/petra-treasure-jordania-by-papermau.html

BV-38 Flying Wing is at http://myhobbycraft.blogspot.com/2010/05/bv-38-flying-wing-172.html

That should keep everyone busy for a while

I'll also throw in Deckard's car at http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/starcarz.html
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #15 on: July 14, 2017, 01:24:11 PM »
14 July 1789 Revolutionaries Storm the Bastille



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Parisian revolutionaries and mutinous troops storm and dismantle the Bastille, a royal fortress that had come to symbolize the tyranny of the Bourbon monarchs. This dramatic action signaled the beginning of the French Revolution, a decade of political turmoil and terror in which King Louis XVI was overthrown and tens of thousands of people, including the king and his wife Marie Antoinette, were executed.

The Bastille was originally constructed in 1370 as a bastide, or “fortification,” to protect the walled city of Paris from English attack. It was later made into an independent stronghold, and its name–bastide–was corrupted to Bastille. The Bastille was first used as a state prison in the 17th century, and its cells were reserved for upper-class felons, political troublemakers, and spies. Most prisoners there were imprisoned without a trial under direct orders of the king. Standing 100 feet tall and surrounded by a moat more than 80 feet wide, the Bastille was an imposing structure in the Parisian landscape.

By the summer of 1789, France was moving quickly toward revolution. There were severe food shortages in France that year, and popular resentment against the rule of King Louis XVI was turning to fury. In June, the Third Estate, which represented commoners and the lower clergy, declared itself the National Assembly and called for the drafting of a constitution. Initially seeming to yield, Louis legalized the National Assembly but then surrounded Paris with troops and dismissed Jacques Necker, a popular minister of state who had supported reforms. In response, mobs began rioting in Paris at the instigation of revolutionary leaders.

Bernard-René Jordan de Launay, the military governor of the Bastille, feared that his fortress would be a target for the revolutionaries and so requested reinforcements. A company of Swiss mercenary soldiers arrived on July 7 to bolster his garrison of 82 soldiers. The Marquis de Sade, one of the few prisoners in the Bastille at the time, was transferred to an insane asylum after he attempted to incite a crowd outside his window by yelling: “They are massacring the prisoners; you must come and free them.” On July 12, royal authorities transferred 250 barrels of gunpowder to the Bastille from the Paris Arsenal, which was more vulnerable to attack. Launay brought his men into the Bastille and raised its two drawbridges.

On July 13, revolutionaries with muskets began firing at soldiers standing guard on the Bastille’s towers and then took cover in the Bastille’s courtyard when Launay’s men fired back. That evening, mobs stormed the Paris Arsenal and another armory and acquired thousands of muskets. At dawn on July 14, a great crowd armed with muskets, swords, and various makeshift weapons began to gather around the Bastille.

Launay received a delegation of revolutionary leaders but refused to surrender the fortress and its munitions as they requested. He later received a second delegation and promised he would not open fire on the crowd. To convince the revolutionaries, he showed them that his cannons were not loaded. Instead of calming the agitated crowd, news of the unloaded cannons emboldened a group of men to climb over the outer wall of the courtyard and lower a drawbridge. Three hundred revolutionaries rushed in, and Launay’s men took up a defensive position. When the mob outside began trying to lower the second drawbridge, Launay ordered his men to open fire. One hundred rioters were killed or wounded.

Launay’s men were able to hold the mob back, but more and more Parisians were converging on the Bastille. Around 3 p.m., a company of deserters from the French army arrived. The soldiers, hidden by smoke from fires set by the mob, dragged five cannons into the courtyard and aimed them at the Bastille. Launay raised a white flag of surrender over the fortress. Launay and his men were taken into custody, the gunpowder and cannons were seized, and the seven prisoners of the Bastille were freed. Upon arriving at the Hotel de Ville, where Launay was to be arrested by a revolutionary council, the governor was pulled away from his escort by a mob and murdered.

The capture of the Bastille symbolized the end of the ancien regime and provided the French revolutionary cause with an irresistible momentum. Joined by four-fifths of the French army, the revolutionaries seized control of Paris and then the French countryside, forcing King Louis XVI to accept a constitutional government. In 1792, the monarchy was abolished and Louis and his wife Marie-Antoinette were sent to the guillotine for treason in 1793.

By order of the new revolutionary government, the Bastille was torn down. On February 6, 1790, the last stone of the hated prison-fortress was presented to the National Assembly. Today, July 14–Bastille Day–is celebrated as a national holiday in France.
...History.com

You can find Patricia's vintage model of the Bastille at http://bibigreycat.blogspot.com/2010/07/le-chateau-de-la-bastille-en-1789-merci.html
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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #16 on: July 14, 2017, 07:54:06 PM »
July 15, 1933 Wiley Post Starts Around-the-World Solo Flight



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Wiley Hardeman Post took off from Floyd Bennett Field, Long Island, New York, on a solo around-the-world flight. His airplane was a single-engine high wing monoplane, a Lockheed Model 5C Vega, NR105W, which he previously flown around the world with navigator Harold Gatty. On this flight, he flew approximately the same route around the Northern Hemisphere, making 11 stops over a 15,596 mile (25,099.3 kilometer) flight. He returned to Floyd Bennett Field on 22 July 1933, after 7 days, 18 hours, 49 minutes. This was the first solo around-the-world flight.

The Winnie Mae was built by Lockheed Aircraft Company at Burbank, California in 1930. It had been purchased by an Oklahoma oilman, F.C Hall, and named after his daughter, Winnie Mae of Oklahoma. Wiley Post flew the Winnie Mae for Hall, and later purchased the airplane. He used it to set several speed records and to compete in the National Air Races. NR105W was sold to the Smithsonian Institution by Mrs. Post in 1936, following Wiley Post’s death.
... This Day in Aviation

You can get your own Winnie Mae at http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/aircraft/Lockheed-Vega.html
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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #17 on: July 14, 2017, 08:05:04 PM »
July 16, 1969 Translunar Injection

Say what???



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At 16:16:16 UTC, T+02:44:16.2, the Apollo 11 S-IVB third stage engine reignited for the Trans Lunar Injection maneuver.

One of the necessary features of the Rocketdyne J-2 engine was its ability to restart a second time. The third stage was first used to place the Apollo 11 spacecraft into Earth orbit and was then shutdown. When the mission was ready to proceed toward the Moon, the J-2 was re-started. Using liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen for propellant, Apollo 11′s S-IVB burned for 5 minutes, 41.01 seconds, with the spacecraft reaching a maximum 1.45 Gs just before engine cut off. The engine was shut down at T+02:50:03.03. Trans Lunar Injection was at 16:22:13 UTC.
... This Day in Aviation

Well, I didn't remember that the Saturn Rocket had engines that stopped and restarted.  So today the model is the Saturn V.  There are a couple versions and a blueprint poster available at http://jleslie48.com/gallery_models_apollo.html
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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #18 on: July 17, 2017, 01:03:42 PM »
July 17, 1955 Disneyland Opens



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Disneyland, Walt Disney’s metropolis of nostalgia, fantasy, and futurism, opens on July 17, 1955. The $17 million theme park was built on 160 acres of former orange groves in Anaheim, California, and soon brought in staggering profits. Today, Disneyland hosts more than 14 million visitors a year, who spend close to $3 billion.

Walt Disney, born in Chicago in 1901, worked as a commercial artist before setting up a small studio in Los Angeles to produce animated cartoons. In 1928, his short film Steamboat Willy, starring the character “Mickey Mouse,” was a national sensation. It was the first animated film to use sound, and Disney provided the voice for Mickey. From there on, Disney cartoons were in heavy demand, but the company struggled financially because of Disney’s insistence on ever-improving artistic and technical quality. His first feature-length cartoon, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1938), took three years to complete and was a great commercial success.

Snow White was followed by other feature-length classics for children, such as Pinocchio (1940), Dumbo (1941), and Bambi (1942). Fantasia (1940), which coordinated animated segments with famous classical music pieces, was an artistic and technical achievement. In Song of the South (1946), Disney combined live actors with animated figures, and beginning with Treasure Island in 1950 the company added live-action movies to its repertoire. Disney was also one of the first movie studios to produce film directly for television, and its Zorro and Davy Crockett series were very popular with children.

In the early 1950s, Walt Disney began designing a huge amusement park to be built near Los Angeles. He intended Disneyland to have educational as well as amusement value and to entertain adults and their children. Land was bought in the farming community of Anaheim, about 25 miles southeast of Los Angeles, and construction began in 1954. In the summer of 1955, special invitations were sent out for the opening of Disneyland on July 17. Unfortunately, the pass was counterfeited and thousands of uninvited people were admitted into Disneyland on opening day. The park was not ready for the public: food and drink ran out, a women’s high-heel shoe got stuck in the wet asphalt of Main Street USA, and the Mark Twain Steamboat nearly capsized from too many passengers.

Disneyland soon recovered, however, and attractions such as the Castle, Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride, Snow White’s Adventures, Space Station X-1, Jungle Cruise, and Stage Coach drew countless children and their parents. Special events and the continual building of new state-of-the-art attractions encouraged them to visit again. In 1965, work began on an even bigger Disney theme park and resort near Orlando, Florida. Walt Disney died in 1966, and Walt Disney World was opened in his honor on October 1, 1971. Epcot Center, Disney-MGM Studios, and Animal Kingdom were later added to Walt Disney World, and it remains Florida’s premier tourist attraction. In 1983, Disneyland Tokyo opened in Japan, and in 1992 Disneyland Paris–or “EuroDisney”–opened to a mixed reaction in Marne-la-Vallee. The newest Disneyland, in Hong Kong, opened its doors in September 2005.
... History.com

You can find Cinderella's Castle at http://www.seite42.de/78_46e.htm

As an aside, the second Disney Park was supposed to be in St. Louis, south of the Arch, along the Mississippi.  Mainstreet, USA was actually going to be a multi-level amusement park, too, which would have been interesting.  However, no alcohol was to be served, so Uncle Auggie (Augustus Busch) led a spirited campaign to stonewall the project, hoping to pressure Disney ( a Missourian by birth) to allow Anheuser-Busch products to be sold not only at Mainstreet, USA, but also at Disneyland.  The first Haunted Mansion was designed for this park.  Instead, Disney purchased land in Florida.
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #19 on: July 18, 2017, 12:23:45 PM »
July 18, 1942 First Pure Jet Flight of Me 262



The first test flights of the Me 262 began on 18 April 1941, with the Me 262 V1 example, bearing its Stammkennzeichen radio code letters of PC+UA, but since its intended BMW 003 turbojets were not ready for fitting, a conventional Junkers Jumo 210 engine was mounted in the V1 prototype's nose, driving a propeller, to test the Me 262 V1 airframe. When the BMW 003 engines were installed, the Jumo was retained for safety, which proved wise as both 003s failed during the first flight and the pilot had to land using the nose-mounted engine alone.[1] The V1 through V4 prototype airframes all possessed what would become an uncharacteristic feature for most later jet aircraft designs, a fully retracting conventional gear setup with a retracting tailwheel — indeed, the very first prospective German "jet fighter" airframe design ever flown, the Heinkel He 280, used a retractable tricycle landing gear from its beginnings, and flying on jet power alone as early as the end of March 1941.

The V3 third prototype airframe, with the code PC+UC, became a true jet when it flew on 18 July 1942 in Leipheim near Günzburg, Germany, piloted by Fritz Wendel. This was almost nine months ahead of the British Gloster Meteor's first flight on 5 March 1943. Its retracting conventional gear, a feature shared with the first four Me 262 V-series airframes, caused its jet exhaust to deflect off the runway, with the wing's turbulence negating the effects of the elevators, and the first takeoff attempt was cut short.[29]

On the second attempt, Wendel solved the problem by tapping the aircraft's brakes at takeoff speed, lifting the horizontal tail out of the wing's turbulence. The aforementioned initial four prototypes (V1-V4) were built with the conventional gear configuration. Changing to a tricycle arrangement — a permanently fixed undercarriage on the fifth prototype (V5), with the definitive fully retractable nosewheel gear on the V6 (with Stammkennzeichen code VI+AA) and subsequent aircraft corrected this problem.

You can find Nobi's Me 262 at http://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-48-me262a-1a-schwalbe.html

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #20 on: July 19, 2017, 12:47:47 PM »
July 19, 1963...X-15 flies to a record altitude of 347,800 feet

1963: Joe Walker flies a North American X-15 to a record altitude of 347,800 feet on X-15 Flight 90.
Exceeding an altitude of 100 kilometers, this flight qualifies as a human spaceflight under international convention,
making Walker the first American civilian to make any spaceflight.



You can get a beautiful 1/32 scale X-15 paper model (by Ken West) at ecardmodels.com
https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-32-x-15.html

Note -- This was originally posted by Dave in 2015
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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #21 on: July 20, 2017, 12:56:51 PM »
July 20, 1969 Eagle Has Landed



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102:45:25 Aldrin: “Four forward. Four forward. Drifting to the right a little. Twenty feet, down a half.”

102:45:31 Duke: “Thirty seconds” (until the ‘Bingo’ call).

102:45:32 Aldrin: “Drifting forward just a little bit; that’s good.” (Pause)

102:45:40 Aldrin: “Contact Light.”

102:45:43 Armstrong: “Shutdown”.

102:45:44 Aldrin: “Okay. Engine Stop.”

102:45:45 Aldrin: “ACA out of Detent.”

102:45:46 Armstrong: “Out of Detent. Auto.”

102:45:47 Aldrin: “Mode Control, both Auto. Descent Engine Command Override, Off. Engine Arm, Off. Four-thirteen is in.”

102:45:57 Duke: “We copy you down, Eagle.”

102:45:58 Armstrong: “Engine arm is off. (Pause) Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.”
  This Day in Aviation

There are two LEMs at Lower Hudson Valley.  http://jleslie48.com/gallery_models_apollo.html

There are no strangers in this world ...
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