Author Topic: July (2017)  (Read 576 times)

Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #22 on: July 21, 2017, 11:14:25 AM »
July 21, 2011 End of Final Shuttle Mission



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On this day in 2011, NASA’s space shuttle program completes its final, and 135th, mission, when the shuttle Atlantis lands at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. During the program’s 30-year history, its five orbiters—Columbia, Challenger, Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour—carried more than 350 people into space and flew more than 500 million miles, and shuttle crews conducted important research, serviced the Hubble Space Telescope and helped in the construction of the International Space Station, among other activities. NASA retired the shuttles to focus on a deep-space exploration program that could one day send astronauts to asteroids and Mars.

In January 1972, two-and-a-half years after America put the first man on the moon in July 1969, President Richard Nixon publicly announced that NASA would develop a space transportation system featuring a space vehicle capable of shuttling “repeatedly from Earth to orbit and back.” Nine years later, on April 12, 1981, at Kennedy Space Center, the first shuttle, Columbia, lifted off on its inaugural mission. Over the course of the next 54 hours, the two astronauts aboard NASA’s first reusable spacecraft successfully tested all its systems and orbited the Earth 37 times before landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California.

In 1983, a second shuttle, Challenger, was put into service. It flew nine missions before breaking apart shortly after the launch of its 10th mission, on January 28, 1986. All seven crew members were killed, including high school teacher Christa McAuliffe, who had won a national contest to be the first U.S. civilian to fly aboard the space shuttle. In the aftermath of the disaster, the shuttle program was grounded until 1988.

The program’s third shuttle, Discovery, made its first flight in 1984. Atlantis entered the fleet in 1985, and was followed by Endeavour in 1992. The shuttle program experienced its second major disaster on February 1, 2003, when just minutes before Columbia was scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center and conclude its 28th mission, it broke apart while re-entering the atmosphere over Texas. All seven astronauts on board perished.

Afterward, the shuttle fleet was grounded until July 2005, when Discovery was launched on the program’s 114th mission. By the time Discovery completed its 39th and final mission (the most of any shuttle) in March 2011, it had flown 148 million miles, made 5,830 orbits of Earth and spent 365 days in space. Endeavour completed its 25th and final mission in June 2011. That mission was commanded by Capt. Mark Kelly, husband of former U.S. congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords.

On July 8, 2011, Atlantis was launched on its 33rd mission. With four crew members aboard, Atlantis flew thousands of pounds of supplies and extra parts to the International Space Station; it was the 37th shuttle flight to make the trip. Thirteen days later, on July 21, Atlantis touched down at Kennedy Space Center at 5:57 a.m., after a journey of more than 5 million miles, during which it orbited the Earth 200 times. Upon landing, the flight’s commander, Capt. Christopher J. Ferguson, said, “Mission complete, Houston. After serving the world for over 30 years, the space shuttle has earned its place in history, and it’s come to a final stop.” During its 26 years in service, Atlantis flew almost 126 million miles, circled Earth 4,848 times and spent 307 days in space. The estimated price tag for the entire space shuttle program, from development to retirement, was $209 billion.

After completing their final missions, the orbiters were sent to museums around the country: Discovery went to the National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Virginia, Endeavour to California Science Center in Los Angeles and Atlantis to Kennedy Space Center. A space shuttle prototype, the Enterprise, is now housed at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum in New York.
... History.com

You can find the shuttle, external fuel tank, solid rocket boosters and payload at http://www.axmpaperspacescalemodels.com/old/download5.html#.WXIaE03rtBo
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #23 on: July 22, 2017, 08:41:51 AM »
July 22, 1933 Wiley Post Finishes World Solo Flight

This is actually the biggest thing that I saw today that had a corresponding model.  I might go back later and see if any of the blogs have updated with something else.

But for now, I will just refer back to my post from last week...

July 15, 1933 Wiley Post Starts Around-the-World Solo Flight



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Wiley Hardeman Post took off from Floyd Bennett Field, Long Island, New York, on a solo around-the-world flight. His airplane was a single-engine high wing monoplane, a Lockheed Model 5C Vega, NR105W, which he previously flown around the world with navigator Harold Gatty. On this flight, he flew approximately the same route around the Northern Hemisphere, making 11 stops over a 15,596 mile (25,099.3 kilometer) flight. He returned to Floyd Bennett Field on 22 July 1933, after 7 days, 18 hours, 49 minutes. This was the first solo around-the-world flight.

The Winnie Mae was built by Lockheed Aircraft Company at Burbank, California in 1930. It had been purchased by an Oklahoma oilman, F.C Hall, and named after his daughter, Winnie Mae of Oklahoma. Wiley Post flew the Winnie Mae for Hall, and later purchased the airplane. He used it to set several speed records and to compete in the National Air Races. NR105W was sold to the Smithsonian Institution by Mrs. Post in 1936, following Wiley Post’s death.
... This Day in Aviation

You can get your own Winnie Mae at http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/aircraft/Lockheed-Vega.html

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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #24 on: July 23, 2017, 01:33:02 PM »
July 23, 1953 Maj. Glenn Shoots Down Third MiG During Korean War



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Major John H. Glenn, Jr., United States Marine Corps, shot down his third and final MiG-15 fighter during the Korean War.

Major Glenn had previously flown a Grumman F9F Panther with VMF-311, but was assigned to the U.S. Air Force 25th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, 51st Fighter Interceptor Group, at K13, Suwon, Korea.

While on temporary duty with the Air Force squadron, Glenn flew the North American Aviation F-86F Sabre air superiority fighter. He shot down all three MiG fighters with F-86F-30-NA, serial number 52-4584. His previous victories were on 12 July and 19 July, 1953, also against MiG-15 fighters.

Major Glenn had painted the names of his wife and two daughters on the nose of his airplane, but after being heard complaining that there “weren’t enough MiGs”, he came out one morning to find MIG MAD MARINE painted on the Sabre’s side.
... This Day in Aviation

You can get your own MiG Mad Marine at http://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-48-f-86f-sabre-two-liveries-the-huff-and-mig-mad-marine.html

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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #25 on: July 24, 2017, 11:25:12 AM »
July 24, 1981 Summer Glau Born



Okay, I'm a Serenity/Firefly fan.  I admit it.  I wish it had a longer run on TV and I wouldn't mind seeing a second movie.  Only, it would be hard to picture a chubby middle-aged Castle playing Mal, but I'm sure I'd get over it quickly if the movie was done.

In history, I am always intrigued by the War of Secession and even though my relatives all fought for the North, I can see why the Confederate States felt they had to leave these United States.  This series has such a feel of post-civil war sentiments, with similar situations of 'rebels' needing to find a place and building one.  And it's in space, and there are Reavers, and ...

For the model today, it's the re-post of Jim Bowen's Serenity ship, http://newobmij.tumblr.com/tagged/Serenity
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #26 on: July 25, 2017, 11:51:12 AM »
July 25, 1909 English Channel First Flight



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At 4:41 a.m., Louis Charles Joseph Blériot took of from Calais in his own Type XI single-engine monoplane, and flew across the English Channel to Dover. He landed at Northfield Meadow near Dover Castle. Blériot flew at about 250 feet (76 meters) above the water, at approximately 45 miles per hour (72 kilometers per hour).

The airplane did not have a compass, so Blériot used a French destroyer heading toward Dover as a visual reference.  After passing the ship, visibility deteriorated and he was only able to see the water below him. He flew on and after about ten minutes was able to see the coastline ahead.

He realized that the wind had blown him to the east of his intended course so he flew along the shoreline until he recognized a signal marking the landing point. The wind was gusty near the cliffs and he landed harder than intended, slightly damaging his airplane.

This was the first time an airplane had been flown across the English Channel, and brought Blériot international acclaim. Very quickly, orders for his Type XI were coming in.

The Blériot Type XI was a single-seat, single-engine monoplane. It was 24 feet, 11 inches (7.595 meters) long with a wingspan of 27 feet, 11 inches (8.509 meters) and overall height of 8 feet, 10 inches (2.692 meters).

In its original configuration, the airplane was powered by a 35 horsepower (26 kW) 7-cylinder R.E.P. engine (designed by Robert Albert Charles Esnault-Pelterie) driving a four-bladed paddle type propeller. This engine was unreliable and was soon changed for an air-cooled Alessandro Anzani & Co., three-cylinder “fan”-type radial engine (or W-3) and a highly-efficient Chauvière Intégrale two-bladed propeller.

The Blériot XI had an empty weight of 507 pounds (230 kilograms). Maximum speed was 47 miles per hour (76 kilometers per hour) and the service ceiling was (3,280 feet) 1,000 meters.
... This Day in Aviation



You can get your Bleriot XI at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-48-bleriot-xi.html.  I imagine that it would take longer to build than the 36.5 minutes that the flight lasted

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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #27 on: July 26, 2017, 12:42:26 PM »
July 26, 1971, Apollo XV Launch



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At 13:34:06 UTC, the Apollo 15/Saturn V (AS-510) was launched from Launch Complex 39A, Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The three-man flight crew were David R. Scott, Mission Commander, on his third space flight; Alfred M. Worden, Command Module Pilot, on his first mission; and James B. Irwin, Lunar Module Pilot, also on his first space mission. This was the fifth manned lunar landing mission (though Apollo 13 did not land). The destination was the Hadley Rille.

On this flight, NASA was sending a powered wheeled transport vehicle, the Lunar Roving Vehicle, or LRV. This would allow the astronauts on the moon’s surface to travel farther from the landing point, spend less time getting where they were going, and with less physical exertion. They would also be able to return to their space craft with more geologic samples. The emphasis on this flight was to conduct a meaningful scientific examination of the surface. The astronauts had received extensive training in this regard.
...This Day in Aviation

Well, I don't think Ken L. West's model is done yet, and I don't know how to get hold of the Richard Vyskovsky version from ABC (unless you use one of the Chinese pirate sites), so we'll go with the next iteration, Dave's Lunar Cup version at http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/specialz.html

By the way, this is one of the few models that I've built that had lots of people wanting it, but I haven't parted with it.  It's just too stinking cool
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #28 on: July 27, 2017, 01:52:43 PM »
July 27, 1940 Bugs Bunny Debut 'Wild Hare'



After going down a few 'Rabbit Trails', came back to this one ...

http://thepaperwonderland.blogspot.com/2010/07/bugs-bunny-papercraft.html
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #29 on: July 28, 2017, 12:25:04 PM »
July 28, 1978 Animal House Released



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On this day in 1978, National Lampoon’s Animal House, a movie spoof about 1960s college fraternities starring John Belushi, opens in U.S. theaters. Produced with an estimated budget of $3 million, Animal House became a huge, multi-million-dollar box-office hit, spawned a slew of cinematic imitations and became part of pop-culture history with such memorable lines as “Fat, drunk and stupid is no way to go through life, son.”

Set at the fictional Faber College (the University of Oregon served as a stand-in during filming), Animal House centered around the disreputable Delta House fraternity, whose members enjoyed beer-soaked toga parties and crude pranks such as putting a horse in the dean’s office. Animal House was the first big hit for director John Landis, who went on to helm The Blues Brothers (1980), Trading Places (1983) and Coming to America (1988). The film’s cast included a then-unknown Kevin Bacon (Footloose, Mystic River), Karen Allen (Raiders of the Lost Ark) and Tom Hulce (Amadeus), all of whom were then just beginning their movie careers.

Animal House was co-written by Doug Kenney, Harold Ramis and Chris Miller, whose days at Dartmouth College in the early 1960s served as an inspiration for the film. Animal House marked the first film produced in affiliation with National Lampoon, a college magazine that was first published in 1970 and known for its dark humor. Other National Lampoon movies included Vacation (1983), which was written by John Hughes, directed by Ramis and starred SNL alum Chevy Chase.

At the time Animal House was released, John Belushi, who played party animal Bluto Blutarsky, was starring on the TV sketch comedy show Saturday Night Live (SNL). Belushi, who was born January 24, 1949, appeared on SNL from 1975 to 1979 and co-starred in the hit movie Blues Brothers with his SNL castmate Dan Akroyd. Belushi died of a drug overdose at age 33 on March 5, 1982, at the Chateau Marmont hotel in West Hollywood, California.
... History.com

I am so grateful to Webdude for making his models available on Google Drive, where you can find the Deathmobile, with the parade float disguise.  You can get it at https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0By3a5MPIUqbOMkRuSWFMNEtTOW8&usp=sharing&tid=0By3a5MPIUqbOejhGUHc0dkdOMUk



Man, I feel old today.  Hard to believe that movie is that old.  Belushi gone.  Webdude gone.  And by Monday I'll be a grandpa
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #30 on: July 29, 2017, 08:47:05 AM »
July 29, 1954 Fellowship of the Ring Published



Publication of "Fellowship of the Ring" 1st volume of "Lord of the Rings" by J. R. R. Tolkien by George Allen and Unwin in London

Rather than going 'movie model', let's go with Olli's Hobbit Home, http://cutandfold.info/cutandfoldforum/index.php?topic=525.0



I hope Olli is doing well
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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #31 on: July 29, 2017, 08:48:23 AM »
July 30, 1947 Arnold Schwarzenegger Born



I've always been a fan of JOssorio's 'thick flats' for displays, so for the model, we'll use his Terminator, http://librosgratispapercraftymas.blogspot.com.es/2012/12/the-terminator.html

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Vermin King

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Re: July (2017)
« Reply #32 on: July 30, 2017, 11:11:36 PM »
July 31, 1965 J.K. Rowling Born



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On this day in 1965, Joanne Rowling, better known the world over as J.K. Rowling, the author and creator of the celebrated Harry Potter book series, is born near Bristol, England. Beginning in the late 1990s, Rowling’s seven Harry Potter novels became international blockbusters, selling over 400 million copies and being translated into more than 60 languages. The books also spawned a series of movies, video games and other merchandise that made Rowling one of the wealthiest people in the entertainment industry.

Rowling attended England’s University of Exeter, where she studied French, and later worked for human-rights organization Amnesty International in London and as a language instructor in Portugal. The idea for Harry Potter came to Rowling when she was riding a train from Manchester, England, to London in 1990. She began writing the first book that night. Rowling finished the book while living in Edinburgh, Scotland, where she struggled financially as a single mother and battled depression. Her completed manuscript was turned down by a number of publishers before she got a book deal with Bloomsbury Publishing in August 1996.

The first Harry Potter book debuted in Great Britain in 1997 under the title Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. The book was released in the United States the following year and renamed Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. Children and adults alike were captivated by the story of the bespectacled boy wizard Harry, his friends Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger, their adventures at the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry and Harry’s struggles against his enemy, the evil Lord Voldemort.

On November 16, 2001, the first Harry Potter film, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, opened in America and was a huge box-office success. It was directed by Chris Columbus (Home Alone, Mrs. Doubtfire) and starred British child actor Daniel Radcliffe as Harry Potter, Rupert Grint as Ron and Emma Watson in the role of Hermione. A roster of celebrated actors took supporting roles in the film and its various sequels, including Ralph Fiennes, Maggie Smith, Alan Rickman, Emma Thompson, Richard Harris and Gary Oldman.

The seventh and final (according to Rowling’s predetermined plan) Harry Potter novel, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, debuted in U.S. bookstores on July 21, 2007. Like all the previous Harry Potter books, it is slated to become a movie, to be released in 2010. To date, the Harry Potter films are the most financially successful series in history, having surpassed both the Star Wars and James Bond franchises.
... History.com

For the model, I'm going with Harry's wand, which didn't make it through the entire series, but it was the one that chose him, http://paperinside.com/harry-potter/wand/

There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet