Author Topic: August (2017)  (Read 794 times)

Vermin King

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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #11 on: August 11, 2017, 11:21:07 AM »
August 11, 1942 Hedy Lamarr Issued Patent



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Actress Hedy Lamarr and composer George Antheil receive a patent for a Frequency-hopping spread spectrum communication system that later became the basis for modern technologies in wireless telephones and Wi-Fi.
...This Day in US Military History

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Lamarr's reputation as an inventor is based on her co-creation of a frequency-hopping system with George Antheil, an avant garde composer and neighbor of Lamarr in California. During World War II, Lamarr was inspired to contribute to the war effort, and focused her efforts on countering torpedoes. In her home, explains author Richard Rhodes during an interview on CBS, she devoted a room to drafting her designs for frequency-hopping.[17]

Lamarr and Antheil discussed the fact that radio-controlled torpedoes, while important in the naval war, could easily be jammed by broadcasting interference at the frequency of the control signal, causing the torpedo to go off course.[18] Lamarr had learned something about torpedoes during her marriage to Mandl. Lamarr and Antheil developed the idea of using frequency hopping to avoid jamming. This was achieved by using a piano roll to unpredictably change the signal sent between a control center and the torpedo at short bursts within a range of 88 frequencies in the radio-frequency spectrum (there are 88 black and white keys on a piano keyboard).

The specific code for the sequence of frequencies would be held identically by the controlling ship and in the torpedo. It would be practically impossible for the enemy to scan and jam all 88 frequencies, as computation this complex would require too much power. The frequency-hopping sequence was controlled by a player-piano mechanism, which Antheil had earlier used to score his Ballet Mécanique.[citation needed]

On 11 August 1942, U.S. Patent 2,292,387 was granted to Hedy Kiesler Markey, Lamarr's married name at the time, and George Antheil. This early version of frequency hopping, although novel, soon was met with opposition from the U.S. Navy and was not adopted. The idea was not implemented in the U.S. until 1962, when it was used by U.S. military ships during a blockade of Cuba after the patent had expired. Lamarr's work was honored in 1997, when the Electronic Frontier Foundation gave her a belated award for her contributions. In 1998, an Ottawa wireless technology developer, Wi-LAN Inc., acquired a 49% claim to the patent from Lamarr for an undisclosed amount of stock.

Lamarr's and Antheil's frequency-hopping idea served as a basis for modern spread-spectrum communication technology, such as Bluetooth, COFDM (used in Wi-Fi network connections), and CDMA (used in some cordless and wireless telephones). Blackwell, Martin, and Vernam's 1920 patent seems to lay the communications groundwork for Lamarr and Antheil's patent, which employed the techniques in the autonomous control of torpedoes.
... Wikipedia

Couldn't find a router, so I'll just post a cell phone, https://www.flickr.com/photos/76446879@N02/20457339570
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Vermin King

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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #12 on: August 11, 2017, 02:57:20 PM »
August 12, 1990 Sue the Tyrannosaur Discovered



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On this day in 1990, fossil hunter Susan Hendrickson discovers three huge bones jutting out of a cliff near Faith, South Dakota. They turn out to be part of the largest-ever Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton ever discovered, a 65 million-year-old specimen dubbed Sue, after its discoverer.

Amazingly, Sue’s skeleton was over 90 percent complete, and the bones were extremely well-preserved. Hendrickson’s employer, the Black Hills Institute of Geological Research, paid $5,000 to the land owner, Maurice Williams, for the right to excavate the dinosaur skeleton, which was cleaned and transported to the company headquarters in Hill City. The institute’s president, Peter Larson, announced plans to build a non-profit museum to display Sue along with other fossils of the Cretaceous period.

In 1992, a long legal battle began over Sue. The U.S. Attorney’s Office claimed Sue’s bones had been seized from federal land and were therefore government property. It was eventually found that Williams, a part-Native American and member of the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe, had traded his land to the tribe two decades earlier to avoid paying property taxes, and thus his sale of excavation rights to Black Hills had been invalid. In October 1997, Chicago’s Field Museum purchased Sue at public auction at Sotheby’s in New York City for $8.36 million, financed in part by the McDonald’s and Disney corporations.

Sue’s skeleton went on display at the Field Museum in May 2000. The tremendous T.rex skeleton–13 feet high at the hips and 42 feet long from head to toe–is displayed in one of the museum’s main halls. Another exhibit gives viewers a close-up view of Sue’s five foot-long, 2,000-pound skull with its 58 teeth, some as long as a human forearm.

Sue’s extraordinarily well-preserved bones have allowed scientists to determine many things about the life of T.rex. They have determined that the carnivorous dinosaur had an incredible sense of smell, as the olfactory bulbs were each bigger than the cerebrum, the thinking part of the brain. In addition, Sue was the first T.rex skeleton to be discovered with a wishbone, a crucial discovery that provided support for scientists’ theory that birds are a type of living dinosaur. One thing that remains unknown is Sue’s actual gender; to determine this, scientists would have to compare many more T.rex skeletons than the 22 that have been found so far.
... History.com

You can get your own Tyrannosaur skeleton at http://paperm.jp/template/template.asp?code=lv_dinosaur&ref=redirect
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Vermin King

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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #13 on: August 11, 2017, 02:58:46 PM »
August 13, 1899 Alfred Hitchcock Born



Because of the picture, I'm going to throw the Ravensblight Raven in for the model, http://ravensblight.com/Raven.html

If you are looking for more of a challenge, there is always the Bates House, http://www.haunteddimensions.raykeim.com/index660.html

It sure didn't seem like it was 1980 when he died.  Man, I'm getting old
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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #14 on: August 14, 2017, 01:39:30 PM »
August 14, 1985 Michael Jackson Takes Control of Beatles' Publishing Rights



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It was during their collaboration on 1983's "Say Say Say" that former Beatle Paul McCartney is said to have advised King of Pop Michael Jackson to invest some of his enormous wealth in music publishing. It was sound financial advice that McCartney may have come to regret giving on this day in 1985, when Michael Jackson purchased the publishing rights to the vast majority of the Beatles' catalog for $47 million, outbidding McCartney himself.
... History.com

I thought it was rather timely that this one came up just after Mauther did his Beatles vignette.
You can find it at http://papermau.blogspot.com/2014/08/the-beatles-cavern-club-diorama-paper.html



And I thought this was timely since Dave recently release the Magical Mystery Tour Bus, http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/specialz.html

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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #15 on: August 15, 2017, 12:41:09 PM »
August 15, 1914 Panama Canal Opens to Traffic



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The American-built waterway across the Isthmus of Panama, connecting the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, is inaugurated with the passage of the U.S. vessel Ancon, a cargo and passenger ship.
  ... History.com

Finally open.  It's a really interesting story of political sleeziness, empire building, a tremendous amount of dirt moved, and the fight against malaria.  If you haven't read up on it, I suggest you look it up.

In one history class in school I did a paper on Goethals, and another year I did one on the political machinations that resulted in the canal.  Yeah, I found it fascinating

It looks a lot different now than it did then.  You can find the Papercrafts.It model of the canal mules at http://www.paperdiorama.com/paper-models/trains/mitshubishi-panamas-mule-diorama/

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Vermin King

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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #16 on: August 16, 2017, 12:28:04 PM »
August 16, 1940 James Nicolson Earns Victoria Cross



Air Ministry, 15 November 1940.

The KING has been graciously pleased to confer the Victoria Cross on the undermentioned officer in recognition of most conspicuous bravery : —

Flight Lieutenant James Brindley NICOLSON (39329) — No. 249 Squadron.

During an engagement with the enemy near Southampton on 16th August 1940, Flight Lieutenant Nicolson’s aircraft was hit by four cannon shells, two of which wounded him whilst another set fire to the gravity tank. When about to abandon his aircraft owing to flames in the cockpit he sighted an enemy fighter. This he attacked and shot down, although as a result of staying in his burning aircraft he sustained serious burns to his hands, face, neck and legs. Flight Lieutenant Nicolson has always displayed great enthusiasm for air fighting and this incident shows that he possesses courage and determination of a high order. By continuing to engage the enemy after he had been wounded and his aircraft set on fire, he displayed exceptional gallantry and disregard for the safety of his own life.


This took place in the Battle of Britain.  For further information see http://www.thisdayinaviation.com/16-august-1940/



Though I could not find a model of his plane, this one is as close as I got.  https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-48-hawker-hurricane-mki-in-four-liveries-number-two.html
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Vermin King

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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #17 on: August 17, 2017, 10:22:08 AM »
August 17, 1943 Patton Reaches Messina



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U.S. General George S. Patton and his 7th Army arrive in Messina several hours before British Field Marshal Bernard L. Montgomery and his 8th Army, winning the unofficial “Race to Messina” and completing the Allied conquest of Sicily. Born in San Gabriel, California, in 1885, Patton’s family had a long history of military service. After studying at West Point, he served as a tank officer in World War I, and these experiences, along with his extensive military study, led him to become an advocate of the crucial importance of the tank in future warfare. After the American entrance into World War II, Patton was placed in command of an important U.S. tank division and played a key role in the Allied invasion of French North Africa in 1942. In 1943, Patton led the U.S. 7th Army in its assault on Sicily and won fame for out-commanding Montgomery during their pincer movement against Messina. Although Patton was one of the ablest American commanders in World War II, he was also one of the most controversial. He presented himself as a modern-day cavalryman, designed his own uniform, and was known to make eccentric claims of his direct descent from great military leaders of the past through reincarnation. During the Sicilian campaign, Patton generated considerable controversy when he accused a hospitalized U.S. soldier suffering from battle fatigue of cowardice and then personally struck him across the face. The famously profane general was forced to issue a public apology and was reprimanded by General Dwight Eisenhower. However, when it was time for the invasion of Western Europe, Eisenhower could find no general as formidable as Patton, and the general was again granted an important military post. In 1944, Patton commanded the U.S. 3rd Army in the invasion of France, and in December of that year his expertise in military movement and tank warfare helped crush the German counteroffensive in the Ardennes. During one of his many successful campaigns, General Patton was said to have declared, “Compared to war, all other forms of human endeavor shrink to insignificance.” On December 21, 1945, he died in a hospital in Germany from injuries sustained in an automobile accident near Mannheim.
... This Day in US Military History

To go along with his personally designed uniform, he carried his pearl-handled Colt, which Gary Pilsworth has uploaded at http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/vbdownloads.php?do=download&downloadid=272
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Vermin King

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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #18 on: August 18, 2017, 01:15:40 PM »
August 18, 1957 Denis Leary Born



No Olds 442, so we'll go with FDNY trucks, https://sites.google.com/site/usaffireprotection/home/fdny-models
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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #19 on: August 19, 2017, 01:08:05 PM »
August 19, 1871 Orville Wright Born
August 19, 1939 Aviation Day Proclaimed



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In 1939, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, President of the United States of America, proclaimed Orville Wright’s birthday, 19 August, as National Aviation Day. Congress, in Title 36 U.S. Code, Subtitle I, Part A, Chapter 1, Section 118, authorized the federal observance:

The President may issue each year a proclamation –

(1) designating August 19 as National Aviation Day;
 (2) calling on United States Government officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on National Aviation Day; and
 (3) inviting the people of the United States to observe National Aviation Day with appropriate exercises to further stimulate interest in aviation in the United States.

In recent years, the presidential proclamations have called this “Wright Brothers Day.”
... This Day in Aviation

For today's model, let's go with the Wright Flyer from FG, http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/aircraft/Wright-Flyer.html
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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #20 on: August 19, 2017, 01:11:56 PM »
August 20, 1975 Viking I Space Probe Launched



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The Viking 1 space probe was launched from Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida, aboard a Titan IIIE/Centaur rocket. For the next ten months it traveled to Mars, the fourth planet of the Solar System. Once there, it was placed in orbit and began sending telemetry data back to Earth. A Viking Lander descended to the planet’s surface, landing at Chryse Planitia.

This was the first time that a spacecraft had landed on another planet. The orbiter continued to operate over the course of 1,485 orbits. As it ran low on fuel, mission controllers boosted it into a higher orbit to prevent it falling to the planet. Orbiter operations were terminated 17 August 1980. The lander operated for 6 years, 116 days, before the mission was terminated by a faulty transmission which resulted in a loss of contact, 11 November 1982.
... This Day in Aviation

You can find the lander at Lower Hudson Valley, http://jleslie48.com/gallery_models_apollo.html

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Vermin King

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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #21 on: August 19, 2017, 01:22:57 PM »
August 21, 1920 Christopher Robin Born



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On this day, Daphne Milne, wife of writer A.A. Milne, gives birth to a son, who the couple name Christopher Robin Milne. Christopher Robin will be immortalized in A.A. Milne’s books Winnie-the-Pooh and The House at Pooh Corner.

A.A. Milne was born in London in 1882, the youngest of three sons. His parents were both schoolteachers; his father was headmaster at a school where H.G. Wells taught. His family claimed Milne taught himself to read at age two. He began writing humorous pieces as a schoolboy and continued at Cambridge, where he edited the undergraduate paper. In 1903, he left Cambridge and went to London to write. Although he was broke by the end of his first year, he persevered and supported himself until 1906 with his writing. That year, he joined humor magazine Punch as an editor and wrote humorous verse and essays for the magazine for eight years, until World War I broke out. While at Punch, he wrote his first book-for adults, not children.

In 1913, he married Daphne and two years later went to France to serve in World War I. While in the military, he wrote three plays, one of which, Mr. Pim Passes By, became a hit in 1919 and provided financial security for the family. In 1920, the couple’s only son, Christopher Robin, was born. In 1925, the family bought Cotchford Farm in Sussex; a nearby forest inspired the 100-Acre Wood where Winnie-the-Pooh’s adventures would be set.

Milne published two volumes of the verse he wrote for his son. When We Were Very Young was published in 1924, followed by Now We Are Six in 1927.

When Christopher Robin was about one, he received a stuffed bear as a present. The child soon accumulated a collection of similar animals, which inspired Milne to begin writing a series of whimsical stories about the toys. Winnie-the-Pooh was published in 1926 and The House at Pooh Corner in 1928. Ernest Shepard illustrated the books, using Christopher Robin and his animals as models.

A.A. Milne wrote numerous other books and plays, but is remembered almost solely for his beloved children’s work. He died in 1956.
... History.com

One of my favorite books as I was growing up, my mom's Aunt Carrie Anna gave it to me.  It was only while I was reading stories to my son that I realized this was a first edition.

For the model, let's use Julius's Disney Pooh from http://paper-replika.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=6445:winnie-the-pooh-paper-craft&catid=28:disney-movie&Itemid=207688



Since today is Total Eclipse Day, I thought about turning Dave's 3D glasses, http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/free_models.html, into solar eclipse glasses.  Printed on 110# cardstock, your eyes should be protected, but you won't see diddly.  Somebody would probably print on transparency, though ( never underestimate the power of stupidity) so I didn't
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