Author Topic: August (2017)  (Read 795 times)

Dave Winfield

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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #22 on: August 19, 2017, 02:53:26 PM »
lol do I need to put a disclaimer on the model sheet?
or a "don't do that, stupid!" notice?


...okay, I added a note to the file download button!
DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!

Vermin King

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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #23 on: August 19, 2017, 04:32:03 PM »
Can't you just see some moron wanting to watch it in 3d?  Unfortunately, I can ... LOL
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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #24 on: August 22, 2017, 01:08:24 PM »
August 22, 565 St. Columba Reports Seeing Monster in Loch Ness



Going whimsical again.  It was either that or another X-15 post for the highest flight record (which stood for 67 years).

Quote
Loch Ness Monster is similar to other supposed lake monsters in Scotland and elsewhere, though its description varies from one account to the next. Popular interest and belief in the animal’s existence has varied since it was first brought to the world’s attention in 1933. Evidence of its existence is anecdotal, with minimal and much-disputed photographic material and sonar readings.

The most common speculation among believers is that the creature represents a line of long-surviving plesiosaurs. The scientific community regards the Loch Ness Monster as a modern-day myth, and explains sightings as including misidentifications of more mundane objects, outright hoaxes, and wishful thinking. Despite this, it remains one of the most famous examples of cryptozoology.
  ... PapercraftSquare

You can find your own Nessie at http://www.avenue.co.jp/~pdfland/10nessie.html

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Vermin King

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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #25 on: August 23, 2017, 11:44:14 AM »
August 23, 1931 Barbara Eden Born



Saying 'Barbara Eden was the Jessica Rabbit of my age', is probably a stretch, but she was definitely iconic.

For the model, let's go with Gary Pilsworth's Jeannie Bottle, http://www.tamasoft.co.jp/pepakura-en/gallery/gallerydetails.php?id=310
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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #26 on: August 24, 2017, 12:45:32 PM »
August 24, 79  Vesuvius Eruption Buries Pompeii and Herculaneum



Quote
After centuries of dormancy, Mount Vesuvius erupts in southern Italy, devastating the prosperous Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum and killing thousands. The cities, buried under a thick layer of volcanic material and mud, were never rebuilt and largely forgotten in the course of history. In the 18th century, Pompeii and Herculaneum were rediscovered and excavated, providing an unprecedented archaeological record of the everyday life of an ancient civilization, startlingly preserved in sudden death.
... History.com



Mauther's diorama of the Villa Ara Massima can be found at http://papermau.blogspot.com/2013/09/pompeii-diorama-paper-model-by-papermau_26.html



Our thoughts and prayers go out to those affected by the latest earthquake in Italy
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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #27 on: August 25, 2017, 12:39:54 PM »
August 25, 1944 Liberation of Paris



Actually that photo was from the parade on the 26th.  But here's the abbreviated version of Paris being liberated:

Quote
On this day in 1944, French General Jacques Leclerc enters the free French capital triumphantly. Pockets of German intransigence remained, but Paris was free from German control.

Two days earlier, a French armored division had begun advancing on the capital. Members of the Resistance, now called the French Forces of the Interior, proceeded to free all French civilian prisoners in Paris. The Germans were still counterattacking, setting fire to the Grand Palais, which had been taken over by the Resistance, and killing small groups of Resistance fighters as they encountered them in the city. On August 24, another French armored division entered Paris from the south, receiving an effusion of gratitude from French civilians who poured into the streets to greet their heroes—but still, the Germans continued to fire on French fighters from behind barricades, often catching civilians in the crossfire.

But on August 25, after Gen. Dwight Eisenhower was assured by Gen. Charles de Gaulle, leader of the French Resistant forces, that Allied troops could now virtually sweep into Paris unopposed, Ike ordered Gen. Jacques Philippe Leclerc (a pseudonym he assumed to protect his family while under German occupation; his given name was Philippe-Marie, Vicomte De Hauteclocque) to enter the capital with his 2nd Armored Division. The remnants of German snipers were rendered impotent, and many German soldiers were led off as captives. In fact, the animus toward the Germans was so great that even those who had surrendered were attacked, some even machine-gunned, as they were being led off to captivity.

More than 500 Resistance fighters died in the struggle for Paris, as well as 127 civilians. Once the city was free from German rule, French collaborators were often killed upon capture, without trial.
... History.com

It is really quite interesting with all the various sub-stories on this.  Between preventing black soldiers from taking part, that a large portion of this French Division was actually Spanish, how de Gaulle orchestrated things to keep the mostly-communist French Resistance from taking over, even Eisenhower having the French Division move in first so that it was the French liberating their capitol.

As far as models, the only armor (armour) that I could identify was Sherman tanks in French livery.  Good luck finding one of those.



So, since the victory parade went from the Arc de Triomphe to Notre Dame cathedral, you can pick up both of these at the Canon site, http://cp.c-ij.com/en/contents/CNT-0010158/index.html
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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #28 on: August 25, 2017, 02:29:07 PM »
August 26, 1959 BMC Introduces the Mini



Quote
On this day in 1959, the British Motor Corporation (BMC) launches its newest car, the small, affordable–at a price tag of less than $800–Mark I Mini. The diminutive Mini went on to become one of the best-selling British cars in history.

The story behind the Mini began in August 1956, when President Gamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt nationalized the Suez Canal in response to the American and British decision to withdraw funding for a new dam's construction due to Egypt's Communist ties. The international crisis that followed led to fuel shortages and gasoline rationing across Europe. Sir Leonard Lord, head of BMC--formed by the merger of automakers Austin and Morris in 1952--wanted to produce a British alternative to the tiny, fuel-efficient German cars that were cornering the market after the Suez Crisis. He turned to Alec Issigonis, a Turkish immigrant who as chief engineer at Morris Motors had produced the Morris Minor, a teapot-shaped cult favorite that had nonetheless never seriously competed with the Volkswagen "Beetle" or Fiat's 500 or Cinquecento.


Mini development began in 1957 and took place under a veil of secrecy; the project was known only as ADO (for Austin Drawing Office) 15. After about two and a half years–a relatively short design period–the new car was ready for the approval of Lord, who immediately signed off on its production.

Launched on August 26, 1959, the new front-wheel-drive car was priced at around $800 and marketed under two names: Austin Seven and Morris Mini-Minor. The two vehicles were the same except for each had a different radiator grille, and by 1962 both were known simply as the Mini. Issigonis' design, including an engine mounted sideways to take up less space, had created a surprising amount of space for a small-bodied car: At only 10 feet long, the Mini could sit four adults, and had a trunk big enough for a reasonable amount of luggage. With a starting price of around $800, the Mini was truly a "people's car," but its popularity transcended class, and it was also used by affluent Londoners as a second car to easily maneuver in city traffic.

By the time production was halted in 2000, 5.3 million Minis had been produced. Around that same time, a panel of 130 international journalists voted the Mini "European Car of the Century." A high-performance version of the Mini engineered by the race car builder John Cooper had first been released in 1961; known as the Mini Cooper, it became one of the favorites of Mini enthusiasts worldwide. In 2003, the Mini Cooper was updated for a new generation of buyers by the German automaker BMW.
... History.com

Ichiyama offers several mini's at http://www5b.biglobe.ne.jp/~kamaboko/1_30model/index.html

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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #29 on: August 25, 2017, 02:30:08 PM »
August 27, 1990  Stevie Ray Vaughan Dies in Helicopter Crash



Celebrity deaths...  I have to admit, this one hit me hard at the time.  Seems like I was always a Stevie Ray Vaughan fan, and he got his life back together after his fight with drug addictions, puts out the best album of his career, and I was really looking forward to seeing him at the Cuyahoga Civic Center.  'Tickets go on sale at the box office on August 28th.  Get there early because it is sure to sell out.'  So I was on my way to get tickets, when I heard the announcement that the concert was cancelled because he died the evening before following a music festival in Wisconsin.  I just pulled over to the shoulder of the interstate and sat there while they played three in a row.

Quote
Four Bell JetRanger helicopters arrived at a golf course near Elkhorn, Wisconsin, to pick up various musical artists after a concert and to return them to Chicago. They departed at 0040 hours, CDT. The number three helicopter, BH206B-3 serial number 2338, FAA registration N16933, was piloted by Jeffrey W. Brown. A last minute addition to the passenger complement was electric blues guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan. Another person switched places with him and boarded a different aircraft. It was very dark, with thick patchy fog. The temperature/dew point spread was such that the pilots had to continually wipe heavy condensation from the windshields. Brown, who was not familiar with the area, took off and after about 300 yards banked sharply and disappeared into the fog. The helicopter impacted a 150-foot hill (45 meters), 0.6 miles away (1 kilometer). All aboard were killed. Although the weather was such that the pilot could have reasonably expected to encounter instrument meteorological conditions, he did not have an Instrument-Helicopter rating and the Bell 206-series helicopters were not certified for instrument flight.

Below is the accident summary from the National Transportation Safety Board:

NTSB Identification: CHI90MA244 .

The docket is stored on NTSB microfiche number 43569.
 Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
 Accident occurred Monday, August 27, 1990 in ELKHORN, WI
 Probable Cause Approval Date: 9/11/1992
 Aircraft: BELL 206B, registration: N16933
 Injuries: 5 Fatal.

FOUR HELICOPTERS WERE BEING USED AT NIGHT TO TRANSPORT A CONCERT GROUP FROM A GOLF COURSE AREA NEAR ELKHORN, WI, TO CHICAGO, IL. AS THE THIRD HELICOPTER (N16933) WAS DEPARTING, IT REMAINED AT A LOWER ALTITUDE THAN THE OTHERS, AND THE PILOT TURNED SOUTHEASTERLY TOWARD RISING TERRAIN. SUBSEQUENTLY, THE HELICOPTER CRASHED ON HILLY TERRAIN ABOUT 3/5 MI FROM THE TAKEOFF POINT. ELEVATION OF THE CRASH SITE WAS ABOUT 100 FT ABOVE THE GOLF COURSE AND 50 FT BELOW THE SUMMIT OF THE HILL. NO PREIMPACT PART FAILURE OR MALFUNCTION WAS FOUND DURING THE INVESTIGATION. PILOTS OF THE OTHER HELICOPTERS REPORTED VFR FLIGHT CONDITIONS WITH SOME FOG. A GROUND WITNESS NEAR THE CRASH SITE REPORTED HAZE AND GROUND FOG OF VARYING INTENSITY WITH PATCHES OF LOW CLOUDS, BUT SAID STARS COULD BE SEEN THROUGH THE FOG.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

IMPROPER PLANNING/DECISION BY THE PILOT, AND HIS FAILURE TO ATTAIN ADEQUATE ALTITUDE BEFORE FLYING OVER RISING TERRAIN AT NIGHT. FACTORS RELATED TO THE ACCIDENT WERE: DARKNESS, FOG, HAZE, RISING TERRAIN, AND THE LACK OF VISUAL CUES THAT WERE AVAILABLE TO THE PILOT.
...ThisDayinAviation

You can get your 1/33 scale Bell 206B at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-33-bell-206b-jet-ranger-paper-model.html
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wag

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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #30 on: August 25, 2017, 05:40:27 PM »
I remember hearing the report on the radio- but initially it was reported that Eric Clapton had died. It was the next day that I found out that Stevie Ray Vaughn had been aboard that helicopter. Odd how I can remember things like that almost thirty years later.
Wayne

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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #31 on: August 25, 2017, 07:27:45 PM »
I know what you mean
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Re: August (2017)
« Reply #32 on: August 28, 2017, 10:34:31 AM »
August 28, 1972  First Ace Since Korean War



Quote
Captain Richard Stephen “Steve” Ritchie, United States Air Force, and Weapons System Officer Captain Charles B. DeBellevue, leading Buick flight with their McDonnell F-4D Phantom II, shot down a North Vietnamese MiG 21 interceptor. This was Ritchie’s fifth aerial combat victory, earning him the title of “ace.”
... This Day in Aviation

You can find the MD Phantom Collection at http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/aircraft/McDonnell-Phantom-Collection.html
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