Author Topic: September (2017)  (Read 818 times)

Vermin King

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Re: September (2017)
« Reply #22 on: September 23, 2017, 11:58:23 AM »
September 23, 1962 ABC's First Color Series--The Jetsons



Yeah, I know I did this one last year, too, with Rosie being the model, but with Dave's recently released Jetsons Flying Car, I had to do it again.



You can find this little gem here:  http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/cartoonz.html
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Vermin King

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Re: September (2017)
« Reply #23 on: September 24, 2017, 12:39:17 PM »
September 24, 1966 Monkees Hit Billboard Top 40



Quote
When producers Bert Schneider and Bob Rafelson conceived a situation comedy called The Monkees in 1965, they hoped to create a ratings success by blurring the line between pop music and television. Instead, they succeeded in obliterating that line entirely when the pop group that began as a wholly fictional creation went on to rival, however briefly, the success of its real-life inspiration, the Beatles. On this day in 1966, the made-for-television Monkees knocked down the fourth wall decisively when their first single, “Last Train To Clarksville” entered the Billboard Top 40.

“Last Train To Clarksville” was written by the team that was also responsible for the theme song of The Monkees, songwriters Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart. Though Boyce and Hart had been working together in Los Angeles for several years before being asked to write and record the soundtrack for Schneider and Rafelson’s A Hard Day’s Night-inspired pilot, their biggest success to date had been in writing minor hits for Chubby Checker and Paul Revere and the Raiders and in being commissioned to write the theme song for Days Of Our Lives. Their association with The Monkees would end up launching Boyce and Hart on a moderately successful career as performers in the late 1960s and early 1970s. By far their best-known hits, however, were the ones they wrote for the Monkees, including “(I’m Not Your) Steppin’ Stone” and “Last Train To Clarksville.”

Just as producers Schneider and Rafelson had reached out to a pair of industry professionals to create the music for the pilot episode of The Monkees, they engaged numerous others to create the other memorable songs in the Monkees’ catalog. Under the musical direction of Don Kirshner, The Monkees featured hits by some of the era’s greatest songwriters, including Neil Diamond, who wrote “I’m A Believer” and “A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You” (both 1967) and the great husband-and-wife team of Gerry Goffin and Carole King, who wrote “Daydream Believer” (1967). Numerous other Monkees songs were written by such songwriting luminaries as Cynthia Mann and Barry Weill, Harry Nilsson and Carole Bayer Sager and Neil Sedaka.

By the time their third album was released, the real-life Monkees—Davy Jones, Michael Nesmith, Mickey Dolenz and Peter Tork—had taken over creative control of their musical output, including taking on much of the songwriting. Although they would release seven more studio albums, none would contain hits as successful or memorable as the one that gave the group its breakthrough on September 24, 1966.
... History.com

Okay, I really liked the quirkiness of The Monkees, and all the wheels that were turning to try to create an American Beatles.

For the model, we are going to go with Dave's Monkeemobile, http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/starcarz.html
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Vermin King

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Re: September (2017)
« Reply #24 on: September 25, 2017, 11:06:59 AM »
September 25, 1960  John Davis Sets FAI Record Over Closed Course



Quote
At Edwards Air Force Base, California, Commander John F. Davis, United States Navy, flew a McDonnell F4H-1 Phantom II to a Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) World Record for Speed Over a Closed Circuit of 100 Kilometers Without Payload, averaging 2,237.37 kilometers per hour (1390.24 miles per hour). Commander Davis flew the 62-mile circular course at an altitude of 45,000 feet (13,716 meters).

FAI Record File Num #8898 [Direct Link]
 Status: ratified – retired by changes of the sporting code
 Region: World
 Class: C (Powered Aeroplanes)
 Sub-Class: C-1 (Landplanes)
 Category: Not applicable
 Group: 3 : turbo-jet
 Type of record: Speed over a closed circuit of 100 km without payload
 Performance: 2 237.37 km/h
 Date: 1960-09-25
 Course/Location: Edwards AFB, CA (USA)
 Claimant John F. Davis (USA)
 Aeroplane: McDonnell Douglas F-4H-1
 Engines: 2 G E J79
...This Day in Aviation

Bruno has a lot of F-4's, though I don't see this one, https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/catalogsearch/result/?q=f-4
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Vermin King

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Re: September (2017)
« Reply #25 on: September 26, 2017, 12:00:44 PM »
September 26, 2008  Paul Newman Dies



Definitely remembered for many of his roles and those famous blue eyes.  Between acting, racing, philanthropy, he was not a typical Hollywood type.  So I had to do a search to see what models may be out there.  I was hoping to find anything from Newman Freeman Racing, but no luck there.  His most recognizable roles don't really lend themselves to paper models so much.  His last narration for a film was on The Meerkats, and there are meerkat models out there, but you don't think Newman when you see a meerkat.  Next to last was in Dale, about Dale Earnhart, but Dale's car doesn't say 'Newman'.  So it comes down to his military career where he was the gunner in an Avenger Torpedo Plane in the Pacific or Doc Hudson.

Eh, let's do both.

You can get Nobi's Avenger at http://thaipaperwork.wix.com/onlinestore
You can get a simple Doc Hudson (which actually builds up pretty well) at http://www.brusino.com/papercraft-pixar-cars/
Or if you want to get TheWebdude's Doc Hudson, go to https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0By3a5MPIUqbOczZzVmF4SFlIQm8&usp=sharing&tid=0By3a5MPIUqbOejhGUHc0dkdOMUk

Re-posted from last year, but with one MAJOR change.  Dave now has Newman's Porsche 935!  http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/racerz.html
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Vermin King

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Re: September (2017)
« Reply #26 on: September 27, 2017, 12:49:36 PM »
September 27, 2012 Curiosity Rover Discovers Streambed on Mars



Quote
NASA's Curiosity rover mission has found evidence a stream once ran vigorously across the area on Mars where the rover is driving. There is earlier evidence for the presence of water on Mars, but this evidence -- images of rocks containing ancient streambed gravels -- is the first of its kind.

"From the size of gravels it carried, we can interpret the water was moving about 3 feet per second, with a depth somewhere between ankle and hip deep," said Curiosity science co-investigator William Dietrich of the University of California, Berkeley. "Plenty of papers have been written about channels on Mars with many different hypotheses about the flows in them. This is the first time we're actually seeing water-transported gravel on Mars. This is a transition from speculation about the size of streambed material to direct observation of it."
... NASA.gov

You can get your own Curiosity Rover at http://paper-replika.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=6762:mars-rover-curiosity-paper-model&catid=139:space&Itemid=204670
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Vermin King

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Re: September (2017)
« Reply #27 on: September 28, 2017, 10:16:16 AM »
September 28, 1942 General Arnold Fights for Transatlantic Bombers



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On this day in 1942, Gen. Henry "Hap" Arnold gives highest priority to the development of two exceptional aircraft--the B-35 Flying Wing and the B-36 Peacemaker--intended for bombing runs from bases in the United States to targets in Europe.

General Arnold was a man of distinction from the beginning of his career: Not only was he one of the first pilots in the U.S. Signal Corps, he was taught to fly by none other than one of the Wright brothers. During World War I, Arnold was director of aviation training for the Army. Between the wars, he embraced a controversial military philosophy that emphasized strategic bombing, eliminating the need for the use of ground forces altogether.

At the time of the United States' entry into the Second World War, the Army Air Forces had become an increasingly distinct military service. Arnold was made its first chief. Along with this honor came the opportunity of a seat with the Joint Chiefs of Staff; initially intended to boost his status to that of his counterpart in Britain, it also increased the stature and independence of the Army Air Forces. Arnold was able to form alliances with British RAF allies who also favored the use of strategic bombing in lieu of ground-force operations.

In 1942, Arnold gave the highest priority to the development of two extra long-distance transatlantic planes that would prove most useful to his strategic bombing game plan: the B-35 and the B-36 transatlantic bombers. The B-35 had been first proposed in early 1941, intended for use in defending an invaded Britain. But the design was so radical (it was tailless), the plane was put on the back burner. It was finally revived because of advantages the plane afforded over the B-36--bombing range in relation to gross weight, for example. Fifteen B-35 planes were ordered for construction--but the first did not take flight until 1946. Designs for the B-36 were also developed early in 1941, on the assumption that the United States would inevitably be drawn into the war and it would need a bomber that could reach Europe from bases in America. It was to be a massive plane--162 feet long with a 230-foot wingspan. But its construction lagged, and it was not completed until after the war.

Although Hap's "high priority" could not cut through the military bureaucracy, 1947 would see the Nation Defense Act establish an autonomous Air Force--a dream for which he had worked. The B-35 would become the prototype for the B-2 Stealth bomber built in 1989. And the B-36 was used extensively by U.S. Strategic Air Command until 1959, but never dropped a bomb.
... History.com

I cannot find a B-35, though FG has a page for the 'NA' model, but they do have the B-36.  http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/Aircraft/Convair-B36.html

Annie certainly looks proud
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Vermin King

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Re: September (2017)
« Reply #28 on: September 29, 2017, 10:28:05 AM »
September 29, 1758 Lord Nelson Born



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Horatio Nelson, Britain's most celebrated naval hero, is born in Burnham Thorpe, England. In the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic wars, he won a series of crucial victories and saved England from possible invasion by France.

The son of the village rector, he entered the British navy as a midshipman at the age of 12. He traveled the world's oceans and at age 20 was made a captain. After Spain joined France in its alliance with the rebellious American colonies, he raided Spanish holdings in Central America and the West Indies. In the years after the American Revolution, his zealous enforcement of the Navigation Acts, which restricted England's carrying trade to English ships, made him unpopular. Between 1787 and 1792, he received no new naval commission. In 1793, however, war broke out with Revolutionary France, and he was immediately given command of the 64-gun Agamemnon.

He served in the Mediterranean, fighting at the port of Toulon and helping to capture Corsica. While ashore on Corsica assisting in the siege of Calvi, he lost the sight in his right eye after being injured by debris from a French shot. Four years later, on February 14, 1797, he acted boldly and without orders and single-handedly took on an entire squadron of Spanish ships that were about to surprise a British fleet off Portugal's Cape St. Vincent. For his heroic contribution to British victory at the Battle of Cape St. Vincent, Nelson was knighted and made a rear admiral. Later that year, he led the unsuccessful British assault on Santa Cruz de Tenerife in the Canary Islands and was shot in the right arm, forcing its amputation.

After his recovery, he pursued a French expeditionary force to Egypt and succeeded in destroying the French fleet at the Battle of the Nile in August 1798, thereby stranding French General Napoleon Bonaparte and his army in Egypt. Nelson was hailed as a great hero and went with his squadron to Naples, where he began an affair with the wife of a British minister. Nelson had a wife in England. He aided Ferdinand, king of Naples, in his struggles against republican revolutionaries but later was recalled to England after he refused an order to take his ships to Minorca. Due to his overwhelming public popularity, however, Nelson was made a vice admiral instead of being punished when he returned to England.

In April 1801, Nelson engaged Danish naval forces at the Battle of Copenhagen. Ordered to withdraw by his superior officer during the fiercely contested battle, Nelson put his telescope to his blind eye and said, "I really do not see the signal." An hour later, victory was his. He was made an admiral and viscount and instructed to return to England to protect the Channel against an expected French invasion. In 1802, a brief interlude of peace with the French began, and Nelson lived with the minister's wife in the countryside.

Upon the renewal of war in 1803, he was given command of the Mediterranean fleet, and he blockaded the French port of Toulon, trapping a French fleet for nearly two years. Meanwhile, French Emperor Napoleon planned an invasion of Britain. He induced Spain to declare war against England and in 1805 ordered the French and Spanish fleets to break out of the British blockades and then converge as a single enormous fleet in the West Indies. The Franco-Spanish fleet, Napoleon hoped, would then win control of the English Channel, and an invasion force of 350,000 could cross to the British isle.

In March 1805, French Admiral Pierre de Villeneuve's fleet broke through Nelson's blockade at Toulon under cover of bad weather. Nelson set off in pursuit, chasing the French to the West Indies, where Villeneuve found himself alone at the appointed meeting place in the Antilles. Not daring to attack Nelson, he recrossed the Atlantic and retreated to the Spanish port of Cadiz, where a Spanish fleet lay. Napoleon called off his English invasion for the time being, and the British blockaded Cadiz.

In October, Napoleon ordered Villeneuve to run the blockade and sail to Italy to assist a French campaign. On October 19, Villeneuve slipped out of Cadiz with a Franco-Spanish force of 33 ships, but Nelson caught him off Cape Trafalgar on October 21. Nelson divided his 27 ships into two divisions and signaled a famous message from the flagship Victory: "England expects that every man will do his duty." In five hours of fighting, the British devastated the enemy fleet, destroying 19 enemy ships and capturing Villeneuve. No British ships were lost, but 1,500 British seamen were killed or wounded in the heavy fighting. The battle raged at its fiercest around the Victory, and a French sniper shot Nelson in the shoulder and chest. The admiral was taken below and died about 30 minutes before the end of the battle. Nelson's last words, after being informed that victory was imminent, were "Now I am satisfied. Thank God I have done my duty."

Victory at the Battle of Trafalgar ensured that Napoleon would never invade Britain. Nelson, hailed as the savior of his nation, was given a magnificent funeral in St. Paul's Cathedral in London. A column was erected to his memory in the newly named Trafalgar Square, and numerous streets were renamed in his honor. The HMS Victory, where Nelson won his most spectacular victory and drew his last breath, sits preserved in dry-dock at Portsmouth.
... History.com

Shipyard offers an amazing model (definitely above my pay-grade) at http://model-shipyard.com/gb/sailing-ships/33-mk002-hms-victory-no-41.html?search_query=victory&results=5



There is also a Micromodel version, but I was only able to find it at pirate sites
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Vermin King

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Re: September (2017)
« Reply #29 on: September 29, 2017, 04:50:09 PM »
September 30, 1949 Berlin Airlift Ended



Quote
The Berlin Airlift officially ended on 30 September 1949, after fifteen months. In total the United States Air Force, Royal Air Force and Royal Australian Air Force delivered 2,334,374 tons, nearly two-thirds of which was coal, on 280,290 flights to Berlin. At the height of the Airlift, one plane reached West Berlin every thirty seconds.

101 airmen lost their lives.
... This Day in Aviation

You can go to Bob's Card Models, http://www.bobscardmodels.altervista.org/page2.htm, to pick up your own Douglas C-54 Skymaster.  It almost looks like it can be the same plane as above.

There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet