Author Topic: November (2017)  (Read 427 times)

Vermin King

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Re: November (2017)
« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2017, 03:41:06 PM »
November 10, 1975 Edmund Fitzgerald Sinks



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The SS Edmund Fitzgerald sinks 17 miles from the entrance to Whitefish Bay on Lake Superior, taking all 29 crew members with her.

At the time of its launch in 1958, the 729-foot-long freighter was the largest and fastest ship on the Great Lakes. The Edmund Fitzgerald began its last journey on November 9, 1975, carrying 26,116 tons of iron-ore pellets. The next day, the ship and her crew met a storm with 60 mph winds and waves in excess of 15 feet. Captain Ernest McSorley steered the ship north, heading for the safety of Whitefish Bay, but the ship's radar failed, and the storm took out the power to Whitefish Point's radio beacon, leaving the Fitzgerald traveling blind. In the heavy seas, the vessel was also taking on a dangerous amount of water. Another ship, the Anderson, kept up radio contact with the Fitzgerald and tried to lead it to safety but to no avail.

Just after 7 p.m. on November 10, the Fitzgerald made its last radio transmission. Presumably, the ship, which was taking on water, was forced lower and lower into the water until its bow pitched down into the lake and the vessel was unable to recover. None of the 29 men aboard survived.

The Edmund Fitzgerald now lies under 530 feet of water, broken in two sections. On July 4, 1995, the ship's bell was recovered from the wreck, and a replica, engraved with the names of the crew members who perished in this tragedy, was left in its place. The original bell is on display at the Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum at Whitefish Point in Michigan.
... History.com

You can find Bryan Tan's model at http://rocketmantan.deviantart.com/art/Edmund-Fitzgerald-Paper-Model-375508622

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Vermin King

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Re: November (2017)
« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2017, 08:55:42 AM »
November 11, 1978 General Lee First Flight



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On this day in 1978, a stuntman on the Georgia set of “The Dukes of Hazzard” launches the show’s iconic automobile, a 1969 Dodge Charger named the General Lee, off a makeshift dirt ramp and over a police car. That jump, 16 feet high and 82 feet long (its landing totaled the car), made TV history. Although more than 300 different General Lees appeared in the series, which ran on CBS from 1979 until 1985, this first one was the only one to play a part in every episode: That jump over the squad car ran every week at the end of the show’s opening credits.

The General Lee was a neon-orange Charger with “01” painted on the doors, a Confederate flag on the roof, and a horn that played the first 12 notes of the song “Dixie.” It belonged to the Dukes of Hazzard themselves, the cousins Bo (played by actor John Schneider) and Luke Duke (actor Tom Wopat), who used it to get out of dangerous scrapes and away from the corrupt county commissioner Boss Hogg. Scenes featuring the General Lee are some of the show’s most memorable: Luke Duke sliding sideways across the car’s hood; the boys hopping feet-first through the windows (the Charger’s doors were welded shut, so the windows were the only way to get in and out); the General flying over ditches, half-open drawbridges and police cruisers.

Because practically every one of the General Lee’s stunts ended up wrecking the car, the show’s prop masters bought every 1969 Dodge Charger they could find (and there were plenty: the Chrysler Corporation sold about 85,000 in all). Then they outfitted each one for action, adding a roll cage to the inside, a protective push bar to the nose and heavy-duty shock absorbers and springs to the suspension. The prop masters also tampered with the brakes to make it easier to do the 180-degree “Bootleggers’ Turn” that so often helped the Duke boys evade Boss Hogg. Cars used for jumps also got trunks full of concrete or lead ballast to keep them from flipping over in midair.

While “The Dukes of Hazzard” was on the air, the General Lee got about 35,000 fan letters each month. Fans bought millions of remote-controlled and toy versions of the car, and some even modified their real cars to look like the Dukes’ Charger. Indianapolis DJ Travis Bell restored the original General Lee in 2006.
... History.com

You can get you own General Lee at http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/starcarz.html.  You know you want to do some pretend jumps with it humming the Dukes theme song and making engine and crash noises.  Have fun

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Vermin King

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Re: November (2017)
« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2017, 08:56:41 AM »
November 12, 1861 The Fingal Successfully Runs Union Blockade into Savannah

The merchant ship Fingal ran the blockade into Savannah, Georgia, with a large cargo of weapons and military supplies. This is the first successful blockade run purely for the benefit of the Confederate war effort.  After Union forces closed the exits from Savannah, preventing her further use as a blockade runner, Fingal was converted to a casemate ironclad and renamed Atlanta.



You can find the model at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-200-css-atlanta-ironclad-paper-model.html
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2017)
« Reply #14 on: November 13, 2017, 01:51:42 PM »
November 13, 1971 Mariner 9 Orbits Mars



Mariner 9 became the first spacecraft to orbit another planet.  It sent photos back to Earth for over a year before it was turned off.

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During her one-year mission, Mariner 9 took over seven thousand images, covering 100% of the Martian surface, and unveiling never-before-seen features on the red planet, including Olympus Mons (the largest volcano in the Solar System), and Valles Marineris, which was named after the Spacecraft in its honor.

Forty years after launch, Mariner 9 remains in Mars orbit, her fuel having long run out. She will continue to orbit the red planet until sometime after 2022, when she is expected to burn up in atmosphere or smash into the Martian surface.
... Bryan Tan
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2017)
« Reply #15 on: November 14, 2017, 12:03:45 PM »
November 14, 1994 1st Trains for Public Run in English Channel Tunnel

Tunnelling commenced in 1988, and the tunnel began operating in 1994.  A two-inch (50-mm) diameter pilot hole allowed the service tunnel to break through without ceremony on 30 October 1990.  Eurotunnel completed the tunnel on time, and the tunnel was officially opened one year later than originally planned by Queen Elizabeth II and the French president, François Mitterrand, in a ceremony held in Calais on 6 May 1994.



You can find the model of the Shuttle in original livery at http://www.currell.net/models/eurotunnel_loco.htm
Well, you can see a photo of the model in the original livery, but he changed the model to the le Shuttle livery.  Darn
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2017)
« Reply #16 on: November 15, 2017, 01:00:11 PM »
November 15, 1859 Final Installment of Tale of Two Cities



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On this day in 1859, Charles Dickens’ serialized novel, A Tale of Two Cities, comes to a close, as the final chapter is published in Dickens’ circular, All the Year Round.

Dickens was born in 1812 and attended school in Portsmouth. His father, a clerk in the navy pay office, was thrown in debtors’ prison in 1824, and 12-year-old Charles was sent to work in a factory. The miserable treatment of children and the institution of the debtors’ jail became topics of several of Dickens’ novels.

In his late teens, Dickens became a reporter and started publishing humorous short stories when he was 21. In 1836, a collection of his stories,  Sketches by Boz, was published. The same year, he married Catherine Hogarth, with whom he would have nine children.

The success of Dicken’s first work of fiction, Sketches by Boz, later known as The Pickwick Papers was soon reproduced with Oliver Twist (1838) and Nicholas Nickleby (1839). In 1841, Dickens published two more novels, then spent five months in the United States, where he was welcomed as a literary hero. Dickens never lost momentum as a writer, churning out major novels every year or two, often in serial form. Among his most important works are David Copperfield(1850), Great Expectations (1861), and A Tale of Two Cities (1859).

Beginning in 1850, he published his own weekly circular of fiction, poetry, and essays called  Household Words. He folded the circular in 1859 and launched another, All the Year Round, which included the first chapter of A Tale of Two Cities. In 1858, Dickens separated from his wife and began a long association with a young actress. He gave frequent readings, which became immensely popular. He died in 1870 at the age of 58, with his last novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, still unfinished.
...History.com

Spoilers!  For the model, let's go with Tektonten's guillotine, http://tektonten.blogspot.com/2009/10/barbie-scale-guillotine-papercraft.html

As if anyone out of 8th grade hasn't had to read the book...
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2017)
« Reply #17 on: November 16, 2017, 11:35:34 AM »
November 16, 1821 Becknell Opens Trade on Santa Fe Trail



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On this day, Missouri Indian trader William Becknell arrives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, sells his goods at an enormous profit, and makes plans to return the next year over the route that will become known as the Santa Fe Trail.

Pure luck made Becknell the first businessman to revive the American trade with Santa Fe. Fearing American domination of the region, the Spanish had closed their Southwest holdings to foreigners following the Pike expedition more than a decade earlier. They threw the few traders who violated the policy into prison and confiscated their goods. However, Becknell and other merchants continued to trade with the Indians on the American-controlled eastern slope of the southern Rockies. While on such an expedition in the fall of 1821, Becknell encountered a troop of Mexican soldiers. They informed Becknell that they had recently won their independence in a war with Spain, and the region was again open to American traders. Becknell immediately sped to Santa Fe, where he found a lucrative market for his goods, and his saddlebags were heavy with Mexican silver when he returned to his base in Franklin, Missouri.

The next summer Becknell traveled to Santa Fe again, this time with three wagonloads of goods. Instead of following the old route that passed over a dangerous high pass, however, Becknell blazed a shorter and easier cutoff across the Cimarron Desert. Thus, while much of the route he followed had been used by Mexican traders for decades, Becknell’s role in reopening the trail and laying out the short-cut earned him the title of “Father of the Santa Fe Trail.” It became one of the most important and lucrative of the Old West trading routes; merchants and other travelers continued to follow the trail blazed by Becknell until the arrival of trains in the late 1870s.
... History.com

For the model, I'm going with Fiddlers Green's Freight Wagon, http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/models/buildings/freight.html

I'm still ticked off at the city of Independence.  The Weston Wagon Shop & Blacksmith building was still standing on Kansas Avenue in the 1970's, but they tore it down to make a larger parking lot for the Farmer's Market.  The wagons would 'head out' down Kansas Avenue heading west.  That goes for all three trails:  Santa Fe, California and Oregon.  Various estimates have the Weston Shop supplying between 40% and 55% of the wagons used on the westward migration on the trails.  That's pretty significant historically.  Shoot, they could have turned it into restrooms or an office or something.  Since then, the Farmer's Market has been moved to a different location, and all that's left is a parking lot with a bronze plaque telling about the historic building they tore down
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2017)
« Reply #18 on: November 17, 2017, 10:55:43 AM »
November 17, 1558 Elizabethan Age Begins



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Queen Mary I, the monarch of England and Ireland since 1553, dies and is succeeded by her 25-year-old half-sister, Elizabeth.

The two half-sisters, both daughters of King Henry VIII, had a stormy relationship during Mary’s five-year reign. Mary, who was brought up as a Catholic, enacted pro-Catholic legislation and made efforts to restore the pope to supremacy in England. A Protestant rebellion ensued, and Queen Mary imprisoned Elizabeth, a Protestant, in the Tower of London on suspicion of complicity. After Mary’s death, Elizabeth survived several Catholic plots against her; though her ascension was greeted with approval by most of England’s lords, who were largely Protestant and hoped for greater religious tolerance under a Protestant queen. Under the early guidance of Secretary of State Sir William Cecil, Elizabeth repealed Mary’s pro-Catholic legislation, established a permanent Protestant Church of England, and encouraged the Calvinist reformers in Scotland.

In foreign affairs, Elizabeth practiced a policy of strengthening England’s Protestant allies and dividing her foes. Elizabeth was opposed by the pope, who refused to recognize her legitimacy, and by Spain, a Catholic nation that was at the height of its power. In 1588, English-Spanish rivalry led to an abortive Spanish invasion of England in which the Spanish Armada, the greatest naval force in the world at the time, was destroyed by storms and a determined English navy.

With increasing English domination at sea, Elizabeth encouraged voyages of discovery, such as Sir Francis Drake’s circumnavigation of the world and Sir Walter Raleigh’s expeditions to the North American coast.

The long reign of Elizabeth, who became known as the “Virgin Queen” for her reluctance to endanger her authority through marriage, coincided with the flowering of the English Renaissance, associated with such renowned authors as William Shakespeare. By her death in 1603, England had become a major world power in every respect, and Queen Elizabeth I passed into history as one of England’s greatest monarchs.
...History.com

For the model I'm going to use Canon's Tower of London, http://cp.c-ij.com/jp/contents/CNT-0011749/index.html.  Not only had she been imprisoned there, but she used it as the Royal Residence until just prior to her coronation.  As most of her residences no longer exist, and have not been guessed at by paper model designers, this is as close to her residence as possible, to my knowledge.

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On January 15, 1559, Elizabeth I was crowned Queen by Owen Oglethorpe, bishop of Carlisle at Westminster Abbey, a little less than two months after the death of Mary I. The total cost of the celebrations, excluding the coronation banquet was £16,741, which according to one calculation would equal about £3.5 million today. Like her predecessors, Elizabeth knew the importance of a good show, especially for a new monarch who needed to re-affirm her right to her crown.

Three days earlier, Elizabeth resided at the Tower of London and on the 14th made the procession to Westminster. Along the way were various displays and pageants for Elizabeth's entertainment. On the night of the 14th, she spent the night at the Palace of Westminster, which was just a short walking distance from the Westminster Abbey. The next day, the 15th, Elizabeth walked in procession to the Abbey for the coronation on the date chosen by Dr. John Dee, who besides being a mathematician and Greek scholar, was also an astrologer. For the procession, Elizabeth walked on a blue carpet that ran from the palace to the abbey, which was torn up by souvenir seekers after the Queen walked past. The ceremony of the coronation was much as it had been for Elizabeth’s predecessors, but with a few significant alterations to the religious aspects of the service. The coronation mass now included readings in English and Latin for the Epistle and Gospel and she retreated to a curtained area in St. Edward’s Chapel during the elevation of the host. After the coronation, Elizabeth walked from the Abbey to Westminster Hall for the traditional coronation banquet, a custom that ended with the coronation of George IV in 1821.
...TudorHistory.Org
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2017)
« Reply #19 on: November 18, 2017, 12:31:13 PM »
November 18, 1996 Bird Expert Sentenced for Smuggling Birds



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Tony Silva, a world-renowned expert and outspoken protector of exotic birds, is sentenced to seven years in prison without parole for leading an illegal parrot smuggling operation. Silva was only one of many to be arrested during "Operation Renegade," a three-year international probe into bird smuggling by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Division of Law Enforcement, although his case was by far the best known.

Silva's indictment and guilty plea shocked the international community of academic experts, conservationists, zoologists, and collectors interested in exotic birds, most of whom had known and respected him as a benevolent bird lover. Since his childhood, Silva had championed the cause of protecting wildlife. His parents, who had emigrated to the U.S. from Cuba when he was a boy, encouraged his love of birds, thinking it was a good way to keep their son out of trouble. Silva began breeding birds at a young age, and, by his 20s, he had already written hundreds of articles and two books on rare parrots and had been named curator of Loro Park, a wildlife sanctuary in the Canary Islands.

However, Silva's image greatly changed when he was accused of smuggling more than 100 hyacinth macaws, valued at almost $1.4 million, as well as hundreds of other exotic birds. Hyacinth macaws are extremely rare, having a wild population numbering between only 2,000 and 5,000. During smuggling operations, many of the birds die.

U.S. District Court Judge Elaine Bucklo, outraged at the inhumane treatement the birds had received at the hands of the smugglers, handed down a uniquely harsh sentence in the Silva case: an 82-month prison term, a $100,000 fine and an order to perform 200 hours of community service during a three-year supervised release program after his prison term. "The real victims of these crimes, " the judge said, "were the birds themselves and our children and future generations who may never have the opportunity to see any of these rare birds."

Silva later claimed that he was set up and had only been trying to protect the birds.  However, many disagree with Silva's interpretation of the events, citing the evidence from his trial, which included photographs of dead parrots, a book detailing his smuggling operations found at his home, and a taped conversation of Silva saying that he had 50 hyacinth macaws for sale.
... History.com

I think the more environmentally responsible way to do exotic birds is either, the parrots from Epson, http://www.epson.com.hk/files/minisite/papercraft/animal.htm, Konica Minolta, http://www.konicaminolta.jp/about/csr/environment/env_contents/paperkraft/index.html, or Yamaha, http://global.yamaha-motor.com/yamahastyle/entertainment/papercraft/animal-global/index.html.  The Yamaha one is actually a Hyacinth Macaw

Darn, the Epson site is down...
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Vermin King

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Re: November (2017)
« Reply #20 on: Today at 09:36:11 AM »
November 19, 1915 First Combat Search and Rescue by Aircraft

Richard Bell Davies was awarded the Victoria Cross on 1 January 1916 for an action at Ferrijik Junction, in Bulgaria near the border with Ottoman-controlled Europe, on 19 November 1915. He was 29 years old, and in command of No. 3 Squadron RNAS. His citation read:


The KING has been graciously pleased to approve of the grant of the Victoria Cross to Squadron-Commander Richard Bell Davies, D.S.O., R.N., and of the Distinguished Service Cross to Flight Sub-Lieutenant Gilbert Formby Smylie, R.N., in recognition of their behaviour in the following circumstances:—

On the 19th November these two officers carried out an air attack on Ferrijik Junction. Flight Sub-Lieutenant Smylie's machine was received by very heavy fire and brought down. The pilot planed down over the station, releasing all his bombs except one, which failed to drop, simultaneously at the station from a very low altitude. Thence he continued his descent into the marsh. On alighting he saw the one unexploded bomb, and set fire to his machine, knowing that the bomb would ensure its destruction. He then proceeded towards Turkish territory. At this moment he perceived Squadron-Commander Davies descending, and fearing that he would come down near the burning machine and thus risk destruction from the bomb, Flight Sub-Lieutenant Smylie ran back and from a short distance exploded the bomb by means of a pistol bullet. Squadron-Commander Davies descended at a safe distance from the burning machine, took up Sub-Lieutenant Smylie, in spite of the near approach of a party of the enemy, and returned to the aerodrome, a feat of airmanship that can seldom have been equalled for skill and gallantry.



Not quite the correct model, but the Nieuport 11 was developed as a single-seat variation of the Nieuport 10.
https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-16-nieuport-11-joseph-vuillemin.html

Still having a difficult time finding a proper livery

Have a great birthday, Dave
There are no strangers in this world ...
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