Author Topic: December (2017)  (Read 550 times)

Vermin King

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December (2017)
« on: December 01, 2017, 10:43:49 AM »
December 1, 1830 First Draft of The Hunchback of Notre Dame Due



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According to an agreement with his publisher, French novelist Victor Hugo is due to turn in a draft of his book Notre Dame de Paris (The Hunchback of Notre Dame) on this day in 1830. However, Hugo applies himself to other projects, extends the deadline several times, and the book is not published until 1831.

Hugo, who had decided to be a writer during his early teens, published his first collection of poetry in 1822, for which he won a pension from Louis XVIII. Also in 1822, Hugo married his childhood sweetheart, Adele Foucher, with whom he would have numerous children.

The following year, Hugo published his first novel, Han d’Islande. His 1827 play Cromwell embraced the tenets of Romanticism, which he laid out in the play’s preface. The following year, despite his contract to write Notre Dame de Paris, he set to work on two plays. The first, Marion de Lorme (1829), was censored for its candid portrayal of a courtesan. The second, Hernani, became the touchstone for a bitter and protracted debate between French Classicists and Romantics. He finally finished Notre Dame de Paris, which pled for tolerance of the imperfect and the grotesque in 1831. The book also had a simpler agenda: to increase appreciation of old Gothic structures, which had become the object of vandalism and neglect.

In the 1830s, Hugo wrote numerous plays, many of them vehicles for his mistress, the actress Juliette Drouet. In 1841, Hugo was elected to the prestigious Acadamie Francaise. Two years later, he lost his beloved daughter and her husband when they were drowned in an accident. He expressed his profound grief in a poetry collection called Les Contemplations (1856).

When Napoleon III came to power, Hugo was forced to flee France and did not return for 20 years. While still in exile, he completed Les Miserables (1862), which became a hit in France and abroad. He returned to Paris during the Franco-Prussian War and was hailed a national hero. Hugo’s writing career spanned more than six decades. He was buried in the Pantheon after his death in 1885.
...History.com

Hmmm, they totally left out his political activism which was the reason he was hailed a national hero.  Not sure why.

For the model, let's go with Canon's Notre Dame cathedral, http://cp.c-ij.com/jp/contents/CNT-0010518/index.html
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2017)
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2017, 01:26:21 PM »
December 2, 1917 Ezra Stone Born

Ezra Who?



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An an actor, producer, director, writer, teacher and lecturer who covered all of the important mediums in one way or another during his lifetime, Ezra Stone will still be forever known for introducing quintessential late 30s and 40s teen Henry Aldrich to both radio and the stage. Stone's pitchy, cracking voice would become a familiar sound in living rooms for well over a decade.

He was born Ezra Chaim Feinstone on December 2, 1917, in New Bedford, Massachusetts. The son of Solomon Feinstone, a chemist, teacher and philanthropist, and the former Rose Meadow, Stone made his debut at age 6 in a play entitled "Phosphorus and Suppressed Desires" for the YMHA players in Philadelphia. He later went on to tour with the National Junior Theatre of Washington, DC, in 1931-1932 before graduating from the Oak Lane Country Day School of Temple University in 1934.

Stone studied for the stage at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts and made his New York debut playing seven roles in the musical revue "Parade" in 1935. Although the ebullient teen built up his young marquee name with such popular comedies as "Room Service," "Three Men on a Horse" and "Brother Rat," he found his pot of gold winning the stage role of Henry Aldrich in "What a Life" in 1938. More riches came his way on Broadway with the role of Dromio in "The Boys from Syracuse" and as Arthur Lee in "See My Lawyer."

Twenty years old at the time he started playing the teenage Henry on radio, Stone enjoyed a healthy 13 years (1939-1953) as the disaster-prone youth who was summoned into millions of homes to the eternal lament of his long-suffering mother: "Hen-reeee! Henry Aldrich!" -- which was invariably followed by Henry's anguished reply: "Coming Mother!" By 1941 "The Aldrich Family" was rated among the "top ten" programs alongside Jack Benny and Bob Hope's popular shows.

As for films, Stone never got it into gear. He can only be witnessed in a support role in the "B" movie Those Were the Days! (1940) as Allie Bang. He also played a cameo as himself, Sgt. Ezra Stone, in This Is the Army (1943), the feature film version of the hit Broadway play he appeared in the year before.

WWII intervened in 1942 but Stone managed to incorporate his life's passion into his military duties by directing and appearing in a number of US Army Special Services productions. On October 5, 1942, Ezra married actress/director/teacher Sara Seegar. They went on to have two children, Josef and Francine.

Following the war Stone focused on writing and directing. During TV's "Golden Age" he not only wrote sketches for the sitcom The Aldrich Family (1949), which ran for four seasons, but also for shows that starred some of TV's funniest: Danny Thomas, Milton Berle, Fred Allen and Martha Raye. At around the same time he directed a number of Broadway productions including "Me and Molly," the farcical "At War with the Army," which also featured wife Sara, and "Wake Up, Darling." In the 1960s Stone started directed TV sitcoms and adventures, making the rounds on such sets as Petticoat Junction (1963), The Munsters (1964), Lost in Space (1965) and The Flying Nun (1967).

Ezra and Sara were married for 48 years until her death in 1990. Four years later, the icon of "old-time" radio was fatally injured in a one-vehicle road accident in New Jersey at age 76.
... IMDb Mini Biography By:  Gary Brumburgh / gr-home@pacbell.net

Let's go with Dave's Munsters collection
Munster House - http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/extraz.html
Munster Coach and Drag-U-La are available at http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/starcarz.html

And the LIS Chariot!
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Dave Winfield

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Re: December (2017)
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2017, 10:43:36 AM »
wow...I learn new things every day!
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2017)
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2017, 12:08:50 PM »
December 3, 1839 Lincoln Admitted to Circuit Court for Practicing Law



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On this day in 1839, future President Abraham Lincoln advances to another stage in his legal career when he is admitted to practice law in the U.S. Circuit Court. It was during his years practicing law that Lincoln honed his now famous oratorical skills.

Lincoln made the first step toward becoming a lawyer in 1836 when the state of Illinois certified him as being “a person of good moral character.” (He did not attend law school but studied on his own while working as a clerk in a law office.) In 1838, he delivered closing arguments in the Jacob Early murder case, persuading the jury that his client, the defendant, had acted in self defense. In 1840, Lincoln was re-elected to the Illinois State Assembly—his third term since 1834—and by 1846 earned a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. By that time, Lincoln had begun to use his debate and speaking skills to help fellow Whigs campaign for state and national offices and, in 1848, he delivered a blistering attack on President James Polk for what Lincoln believed was an ill-advised war against Mexico. He called Polk “a bewildered, confounded, and miserably perplexed man” for waging a war that ended up costing the nation 13,780 lives and a whopping $100 million.

After losing his House seat in the election of 1848, Lincoln returned to practicing law in the state of Illinois, where he helped to establish the new Republican Party. His oratorical skills came in handy while speaking out against the Kansas-Nebraska Act (1854) and the Dred Scott decision (1857), which both served to perpetuate the practice of slavery, an institution Lincoln saw as immoral. In his 1858 campaign for a seat in the U.S. Senate, as secessionist sentiment brewed among the southern states, Lincoln warned in a campaign speech that “a house divided against itself cannot stand.” Although he did not win a Senate seat that year, he earned national recognition as a strong political force. In 1860, Lincoln was elected to the presidency.

Lincoln’s skill with words helped soothe an anxious populace throughout the Civil War. His most famous speech is the Gettysburg Address, which he delivered in the aftermath of the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. In that speech, Lincoln resolved that those killed in the battle “shall not have died in vain; that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom; and that this government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.” Though less than 300 words, the Gettysburg Address is now considered a defining vision of American democracy.
...History.com

Lincoln is another one of my favorite topics.  For the model, we'll go with the Tinsley Building, where he had his first law office.

http://www.illinois.gov/ihpa/Preserve/Pages/construct_tinsley.aspx

When I used to live in Mt. Vernon, Illinois, there is another law office next to the courthouse that Lincoln used occasionally.  I wish it were available
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Dave Winfield

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Re: December (2017)
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2017, 05:36:56 PM »
Why does Lincoln always look like he has a fake face?
Like hes covered in putty or something?
No disrespect intended, but its something I have always noticed.
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2017)
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2017, 06:25:34 PM »
They think he had a condition that mimics premature aging.  I saw one article that postulated that he probably wouldn't have lived another ten years if he hadn't be assassinated.

If he lived today he'd have never been voted President.  He grew the beard at the suggestion of a child in a letter to hide the condition.  He moved awkwardly according to quite a few sources.  He also had a squeaky voice.  I don't know if it is an urban myth, but supposedly the other keynote speaker at the dedication of the Gettysburg national cemetery complained that he was overshadowed by a walking corpse

I shouldn't say 'never', the collective U.S. mentality has given us more than one odd President
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2017)
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2017, 10:35:02 AM »
December 4, 1993 We Lost a Great One



I think I have more Zappa CD's than I have for any other artist.  At 52, he was too soon gone.

I've done my part, though.  My son is almost as big a fan as I am.  Another generation will know who he was.

You can remember Frank with the State of Shock papercraft at http://stateofshockstudios.com/zappa_paper_toy.html
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2017)
« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2017, 10:49:43 AM »
December 5, 1945 Flight 19



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At 2:10 p.m., five U.S. Navy Avenger torpedo-bombers comprising Flight 19 take off from the Ft. Lauderdale Naval Air Station in Florida on a routine three-hour training mission. Flight 19 was scheduled to take them due east for 120 miles, north for 73 miles, and then back over a final 120-mile leg that would return them to the naval base. They never returned.

Two hours after the flight began, the leader of the squadron, who had been flying in the area for more than six months, reported that his compass and back-up compass had failed and that his position was unknown. The other planes experienced similar instrument malfunctions. Radio facilities on land were contacted to find the location of the lost squadron, but none were successful. After two more hours of confused messages from the fliers, a distorted radio transmission from the squadron leader was heard at 6:20 p.m., apparently calling for his men to prepare to ditch their aircraft simultaneously because of lack of fuel.

By this time, several land radar stations finally determined that Flight 19 was somewhere north of the Bahamas and east of the Florida coast, and at 7:27 p.m. a search and rescue Mariner aircraft took off with a 13-man crew. Three minutes later, the Mariner aircraft radioed to its home base that its mission was underway. The Mariner was never heard from again. Later, there was a report from a tanker cruising off the coast of Florida of a visible explosion seen at 7:50 p.m.

The disappearance of the 14 men of Flight 19 and the 13 men of the Mariner led to one of the largest air and seas searches to that date, and hundreds of ships and aircraft combed thousands of square miles of the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and remote locations within the interior of Florida. No trace of the bodies or aircraft was ever found.

Although naval officials maintained that the remains of the six aircraft and 27 men were not found because stormy weather destroyed the evidence, the story of the "Lost Squadron" helped cement the legend of the Bermuda Triangle, an area of the Atlantic Ocean where ships and aircraft are said to disappear without a trace. The Bermuda Triangle is said to stretch from the southern U.S. coast across to Bermuda and down to the Atlantic coast of Cuba and Santo Domingo.
... History.com

You can get your own TBF Avengers of Flight 19 at Nobi's website, http://thaipaperwork.wix.com/onlinestore#!1100-grumman-tbf-1c-avenger-flight-19/c7vs
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Vermin King

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Re: December (2017)
« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2017, 11:50:54 AM »
December 6, 1975 Noel Clarke Born



Yes, it's Mickey the Idiot saving the world with a big yellow truck.

I wonder if any of Volker's 2016 Advent Wreckers could be modified into this ...

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Dave Winfield

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Re: December (2017)
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2017, 12:45:50 PM »
lol he will not be happy until he gets a model of this truck!!!
DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!

Vermin King

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Re: December (2017)
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2017, 01:15:19 PM »
There's a difference between happy and satisfied.  I don't think any of us are ever satisfied.

It was a defining moment for the character.  How many times later did he say, 'I'm the guy who saved the world with a big yellow truck'?  Quite a few.

And I think it would appeal to folks that aren't Doctor Who fans, as well.

Eventually, I will probably have a go at it, but I'm not sure when
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet