Author Topic: January (2018)  (Read 284 times)

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2531
  • Kudos 29
January (2018)
« on: January 01, 2018, 12:50:22 PM »
January 1, 1942 United Nations Formed



Quote
On this day, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill issue a declaration, signed by representatives of 26 countries, called the “United Nations.” The signatories of the declaration vowed to create an international postwar peacekeeping organization.

On December 22, 1941, Churchill arrived in Washington, D.C., for the Arcadia Conference, a discussion with President Roosevelt about a unified Anglo-American war strategy and a future peace. The attack on Pearl Harbor meant that the U.S. was involved in the war, and it was important for Great Britain and America to create and project a unified front against Axis powers. Toward that end, Churchill and Roosevelt created a combined general staff to coordinate military strategy against both Germany and Japan and to draft a plan for a future joint invasion of the Continent.

Among the most far-reaching achievements of the Arcadia Conference was the United Nations agreement. Led by the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union, the signatories agreed to use all available resources to defeat the Axis powers. It was agreed that no single country would sue for a separate peace with Germany, Italy, or Japan-they would act in concert. Perhaps most important, the signatories promised to pursue the creation of a future international peacekeeping organization dedicated to ensuring “life, liberty, independence, and religious freedom, and to preserve the rights of man and justice.”
  ...History.com

Two models today.  The UN building and the VAB
http://www.buildyourownnewyork.com/about.html
http://myhobbycraft.blogspot.com/2011/03/vab-indonesian-un-peacekeepers-135.html
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2531
  • Kudos 29
Re: January (2018)
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2018, 12:53:50 PM »
January 2, 1974, Nixon Signs National Speed Limit into Law

Quote
On this day in 1974, President Richard M. Nixon signs the Emergency Highway Energy Conservation Act, setting a new national maximum speed limit.

Prior to 1974, individual states set speed limits within their boundaries and highway speed limits across the country ranged from 40 mph to 80 mph. The U.S. and other industrialized nations enjoyed easy access to cheap Middle Eastern oil from 1950 to 1972, but the Arab-Israeli conflict changed that dramatically in 1973. Arab members of the Organization for Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) protested the West’s support of Israel in the Yom Kippur War by stopping oil shipments to the United States, Japan and Western Europe. OPEC also flexed its new-found economic muscle by quadrupling oil prices, placing a choke-hold on America’s oil-hungry consumers and industries. The embargo had a global impact, sending the U.S. and European economies into recession. As part of his response to the embargo, President Nixon signed a federal law lowering all national highway speed limits to 55 mph. The act was intended to force Americans to drive at speeds deemed more fuel-efficient, thereby curbing the U.S. appetite for foreign oil. With it, Nixon ushered in a policy of fuel conservation and rationing not seen since World War II.


The act also prohibited the Department of Transportation from approving or funding any projects within states that did not comply with the new speed limit. Most states quietly adjusted their speed limits, though Western states, home to the country’s longest, straightest and most monotonous rural highways, only grudgingly complied. Even after OPEC lifted the embargo in March 1974, drivers continued to face high gas prices and attempted to conserve fuel by buying revolutionary Japanese economy cars. For many, a desire for fuel-efficient automobiles became the standard until the trend toward gas-guzzling sport-utility vehicles (SUVs) emerged in the 1990s. In 1987, Congress authorized states to reset speed limits within their borders, but proponents of the national maximum speed limit law claimed it lowered automobile-related fatalities, prompting Congress to keep it on the books until finally repealing it on November 28, 1995.


Today speed limits across the country vary between 35 and 40 mph in congested urban areas and 75 mph on long stretches of rural highway. U.S. drivers now drive almost as fast as their European counterparts, who average between 75 and 80 mph on the highway. On some roads in Italy, it is legal to drive as fast as 95 mph.
  ...History.com

Welcome the Dark Ages of the U.S. auto industry.



OMG!  U.S. car companies had no clue about how to do fuel-efficient, low emissions vehicles.  So, we get the Gremlin, Pacer, Pinto, Chevette, Vega, Omni, Aries, Reliant, etc., etc.

So the movies took us on high speed races across the country in muscle cars, and on TV we see Ricardo Montalban pushing K-cars.  Movies also took us into space with more Sci Fi films.  Folks didn't want to see a future where all driving was in under-powered, ugly cars.  They dreamed bigger.

But movies don't fully allow you to escape the reality of daily life.  Enter Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan where we see Ricardo Montalban toodling around in a Reliant, not Plymouth, but the USS variety.

For today's model (since there are few models of the awful cars)  we are going with the USS Reliant, http://www7a.biglobe.ne.jp/~sf-papercraft/sf/reliant.html, from SFPapercraft

There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2531
  • Kudos 29
Re: January (2018)
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2018, 01:42:17 PM »
January 3, 1521 Luther Excommunicated



Quote
On January 3, 1521, Pope Leo X issues the papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem, which excommunicates Martin Luther from the Catholic Church.

Martin Luther, the chief catalyst of Protestantism, was a professor of biblical interpretation at the University of Wittenberg in Germany when he drew up his 95 theses condemning the Catholic Church for its corrupt practice of selling indulgences, or the forgiveness of sins. He followed up the revolutionary work with equally controversial and groundbreaking theological works, and his fiery words set off religious reformers all across Europe.

In January 1521, Pope Leo X excommunicated Luther. Three months later, Luther was called to defend his beliefs before Holy Roman Emperor Charles V at the Diet of Worms, where he was famously defiant. For his refusal to recant his writings, the emperor declared him an outlaw and a heretic. Luther was protected by powerful German princes, however, and by his death in 1546, the course of Western civilization had been significantly altered.
  ...History.com

I saw this and immediately thought of Luther's church that Chris Stahl built, designed by his dad



You can find the build thread at http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/architectural-models/39072-martin-luther-s-church-wittenberg-germany.html?highlight=luther

Chris says that by PM'ing him with your email, he will send you the file
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2531
  • Kudos 29
Re: January (2018)
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2018, 10:45:54 AM »
January 4, 1999 The Euro Debuts

Quote
On this day in 1999, for the first time since Charlemagne’s reign in the ninth century, Europe is united with a common currency when the “euro” debuts as a financial unit in corporate and investment markets. Eleven European Union (EU) nations (Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain), representing some 290 million people, launched the currency in the hopes of increasing European integration and economic growth. Closing at a robust 1.17 U.S. dollars on its first day, the euro promised to give the dollar a run for its money in the new global economy. Euro cash, decorated with architectural images, symbols of European unity and member-state motifs, went into circulation on January 1, 2002, replacing the Austrian schilling, Belgian franc, Finnish markka, French franc, German mark, Italian lira, Irish punt, Luxembourg franc, Netherlands guilder, Portugal escudo and Spanish peseta. A number of territories and non-EU nations including Monaco and Vatican City also adopted the euro.

Conversion to the euro wasn’t without controversy. Despite the practical benefits of a common currency that would make it easier to do business and travel throughout Europe, there were concerns that the changeover process would be costly and chaotic, encourage counterfeiting, lead to inflation and cause individual nations to loose control over their economic policies. Great Britain, Sweden and Demark opted not to use the euro. Greece, after initially being excluded for failing to meet all the required conditions, adopted the euro in January 2001, becoming the 12th member of the so-called eurozone.

The euro was established by the 1992 Maastricht Treaty on European Union, which spelled out specific economic requirements, including high degree of price stability and low inflation, which countries must meet before they can begin using the new money. The euro consists of 8 coins and 7 paper bills. The Frankfurt-based European Central Bank (ECB) manages the euro and sets interest rates and other monetary policies. In 2004, 10 more countries joined the EU—-Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia. Several of these countries plan to start using the euro in 2007, with the rest to follow in coming years.
... History.com

For the model, I only know of the Paper Replika Euro Piles, http://paper-replika.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=570:100-euro-piles-papercraft&catid=88&Itemid=207362

There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2531
  • Kudos 29
Re: January (2018)
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2018, 12:57:58 PM »
January 5, 1939 Earhart Declared Dead



Quote
5 January 1939: After she had been missing for 18 months, Judge Clarence Elliot Craig of the Superior Court of the County of Los Angeles County declared Amelia Mary Earhart legally dead in absentia,¹ at the request of her husband, George Palmer Putnam II. She and navigator Fred Noonan disappeared while enroute from Lae, Territory of New Guinea, to Howland Island in the Central Pacific, 2 July 1937.

George Palmer Putnam and Amelia Earhart had met in 1928 while he was interviewing prospects for a transatlantic flight to be sponsored by Mrs. Amy Phipps Guest. She was selected to make the flight and became the first woman to fly the Atlantic Ocean, aboard Donald Woodward’s Fokker F.VIIb/3m, Friendship, which was flown by Wilmer Stutz and Louis Gordon. (See This Day in Aviation, 17–18 June 1928) They were married 7 February 1931 at his parents’ home in Noank, Connecticut.

Judge Craig appointed Mr. Putnam as the executor of Earhart’s estate, which contemporary news reports said was “estimated at more than $10,000.”

Less than five months later, on 21 May 1939, Mr. Putnam married Mrs. Jean-Marie Cosigny James, an author, at Boulder City, Nevada. This was Putnam’s third marriage. It would end in divorce in 1945.
...This Day in Aviation

For the model, it is in the downloads at PM.com, http://www.papermodelers.com/forum/vbdownloads.php?do=download&downloadid=2044
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2531
  • Kudos 29
Re: January (2018)
« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2018, 03:50:22 PM »
January 6-8, 1928  Quilali, Nicaragua



The above photo shows 1st Lieutenant Christian Frank Schilt, United States Marine Corps, receiving the Medal of Honor from Calvin Coolidge on June 9, 1928 for his actions in Nicaragua

Quote
The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in present the Medal of Honor to

FIRST LIEUTENANT CHRISTIAN F. SCHILT

UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS

for service as set forth in the following

CITATION:

For extraordinary heroism while serving with Marine Observation Squadron 7/M (VO-7M) in action during the progress of an insurrection at Quilali, Nicaragua, 6, 7, and 8 January 1928, Lieutenant Schilt, then a member of a Marine Expedition which had suffered severe losses in killed and wounded, volunteered under almost impossible conditions to evacuate the wounded by air, and transport a relief commanding officer to assume charge of a very serious situation. First Lieutenant Schilt bravely undertook this dangerous and important task and, by taking off a total of 10 times in the rough, rolling street of a partially burning village, under hostile infantry fire on each occasion, succeeded in accomplishing his mission, thereby actually saving three lives and bringing supplies and aid to others in desperate need.

Quote
In 1926, civil war broke out in Nicaragua. United States Marines were sent in to establish a protected sector for American citizens who were in the country (this is known as the Second Nicaraguan Campaign). First Lieutenant Schilt, a Naval Aviator since 1919, was assigned to an observation squadron at Managua in November 1927. On 6 January 1928, rebel soldiers ambushed to U.S. Marine patrols at the village of Quilali. The Marines were cut off, unable to be re-supplied or to have the wounded men evacuated. Lieutenant Schilt volunteered to fly into the village and land on a road, carrying supplies and flying the wounded men out. Conditions were difficult, with low clouds, surrounding mountains and hostile gunfire on landing and takeoff.

Over three days, Schilt made ten flights, bringing out 18 wounded Marines and flying in a replacement commander and badly-needed medical supplies. To make a landing strip on the village’s rough, rolling, main street, the Marines on the ground had to burn and level part of the town, and since the plane had no brakes they had to stop it by dragging from its wings as soon as it touched down.

The Chance Vought O2U-1 Corsair was a two-seat, single-engine biplane used for reconnaissance. It was 24 feet, 8 inches (7.519 meters) long with a wingspan of 34 feet, 6 inches (10.516 meters) and height of 10 feet, ½ inch (3.060 meters). It had an empty weight of 2,342 pounds (1,062.3 kilograms) and gross weight of 3,635 pounds (1,648.8 kilograms).

The 02U-1 was powered by an air-cooled, supercharged, 1,343.804-cubic-inch-displacement (22.021 liter) Pratt & Whitney Wasp C (R-1340-88) 9-cylinder radial engine with a compression ratio of 5.25:1. This was a direct drive engine, rated at 450 horsepower at 2,100 r.p.m, at Sea Level.

The O2U-1 had a maximum speed of 151 miles per hour (243 kilometers per hour) at Sea Level. Its service ceiling was 22,500 feet (6,858 meters) and the maximum range was 880 miles (1,416 kilometers) at cruise speed.

Armament consisted of two fixed .30-caliber Browning machine guns, and one or two .30-caliber Lewis machine guns on a flexible mount in the aft cockpit.

Vought produced 291 O2U Corsairs between 1926 and 1930.
...ThisDayinAviation

For the model, I'll go with Bruno's Vought O2U, https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-100-vought-o2u-corsair-usmc-nr-14-s-4-paper-model.html

This is one of those days when one is almost thankful that pirate sites archive models that are no longer available.  Almost.  It's Norman's (Daryl Dixon's) birthday.  All of those Daryl Dixon paper models are gone, and some of the old sites open you up to malicious software if you attempt to do an end-around to get at them.  Luckily, I got that nonsense thwarted.  But it seems the only way to safely get those models is to hit the pirate sites.  A real shame.

I think I might be a bit gun-shy on trying to get at unavailable models for a while.  I had another issue trying to get at an amulet from Supernatural that I just happened to see.  And another issue trying to get at a model from the Norman Conquest.  Be careful out there and make sure you keep your anti-virus up to date
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2531
  • Kudos 29
Re: January (2018)
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2018, 03:01:18 PM »
January 7, 1947 Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer Hits #1



Quote
You know Dasher and Dancer and Prancer and Vixen because of the 1824 poem “A Visit From St. Nicholas” (aka “‘Twas the Night Before Christmas”), but your knowledge of Rudolph—the most famous reindeer of all—comes courtesy of a department store copywriter named Robert L. May, May’s songwriter brother-in-law who set his words to music and the singing cowboy who made a household name of May’s creation.

The story of “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” begins in 1939 at Montgomery Ward, the Chicago-based retail and catalog giant. Seeking a cheaper holiday giveaway than the children’s coloring books they had purchased and distributed in years past, Montgomery Ward asked its own marketing department to create a new and original Christmas storybook from scratch. The task fell to May, a family man with a four-year-old daughter. The story that May wrote was given away to more than 2 million Montgomery Ward customers in 1939. It was not until May’s brother-in-law adapted the story into song almost 10 years later, however, that “Rudolph” truly entered the national consciousness.

May’s brother-in-law was a professional songwriter named Johnny Marks, best known for works like “Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree” (1958) and “A Holly Jolly Christmas” (1962) in addition to “Rudolph.” In 1949, Marks’ song found its way to radio legend Gene Autry, the original Singing Cowboy, whose recording of “Rudolph” sold more than 2 million units in its first year alone on its way to becoming the second-most successful Christmas record in history (after “White Christmas”).

It is at this point in the story of “Rudolph” when those with a nose for legal issues begin to wonder who owned the rights to the beloved Christmas story and money-making juggernaut. In fact, as a paid employee of Montgomery Ward, author Robert L. May had no legal claim whatsoever to an ownership stake in “Rudolph.” Furthermore, May was a widowed single father by 1947, facing enormous debts as a result of his wife’s terminal illness. Yet in a twist that will boggle the minds and warm the hearts of those hardened to the ways of modern American capitalism, the president of Montgomery Ward, one Sewell Avery, signed over to Robert L. May 100 percent of the “Rudolph” copyright in January 1947. May lived comfortably on the royalties from “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” until his death in 1976.
  ...History.com

Since the paperclans.it Rudolph can't be picked up through Wayback Machine, I will go with this one, http://bocchinokamiasobi.web.fc2.com/details5001098.html

There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2531
  • Kudos 29
Re: January (2018)
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2018, 12:53:44 PM »
January 8, 1642 Galileo Dies

Quote
Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei dies in Italy at age 77. Born February 15, 1564, Galileo has been referred to as the “father of modern astronomy,” the “father of modern physics” and the “father of science” due to his revolutionary discoveries. The first person to use a telescope to observe the skies, Galileo discovered the moons of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, sunspots and the solar rotation.

After Galileo published his confirmation that the Earth orbits the Sun, in favor of the Copernican system, he was charged with heresies (ideas that ran counter to teaching of the church) by the Inquisition—the legal body of the Catholic church. He was found guilty in 1633 and sentenced to life imprisonment but due to his age and poor health he was allowed to serve out his sentence under house arrest.
...History.com

At one time there was a model of Galileo's telescope, which may or may not have been a decent replica.  Not sure.  But since I can no longer access it through Wayback Machine, it doesn't matter.

So, let's go with Dave's Galileo shuttle, http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/specialz.html

There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2531
  • Kudos 29
Re: January (2018)
« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2018, 01:21:02 PM »
January 9, 1965  Goldfinger Opens



Quote
On this day in 1965, the James Bond movie “Goldfinger,” which features the suave British super-spy driving an Aston Martin Silver Birch DB5 sports car, opens in theaters across the U.S. Aston Martins would go on to appear in a number of other Bond films.

Aston Martin’s roots date back to 1913, when Robert Bamford and Lionel Martin formed a company in London to sell Singer cars. The following year, the men changed the name of their business to Aston Martin (in honor of Lionel Martin’s successful performances at hill climb races at Aston Clinton in Buckinghamshire, England) and eventually began producing their own high-quality sports cars. By the 1920s, Aston Martin cars were racing in international competitions, including the French Grand Prix and the 24 Hours of Le Mans. In 1947, British industrialist David Brown bought Aston Martin and the next year launched the DB1 (the name comes from his initials). In 1959, an Aston Martin DBR1 took first place at the 24 Hours of Le Mans; the company also won the World Sports Car Championship that year. (Afterward, the company took a lengthy hiatus from racing, returning again in 2004.

In 1987, Ford Motor Company took a 75 percent stake in Aston Martin, which by then had gone through several owners; Ford assumed full ownership in 1994. In 2007, Ford sold Aston Martin to a group of investors for a reported $925 million. At the time, Aston Martin made around 5,000 cars per year, each carrying a price tag of more than $100,000.

The DB5 went into production in 1963 and the elegant coupe was featured in “Goldfinger,” which debuted in Great Britain in 1964. The DB5 also appeared in such movies as “Thunderball” and “GoldenEye.” “Die Another Day,” which premiered in 2002 and starred Pierce Brosnan, featured an Aston Martin V12 Vanquish. In 2006, “Casino Royale,” starring Daniel Craig, featured an Aston Martin DBS.

James Bond was the creation of British author Ian Fleming (1908-1964), whose first Bond book, “Casino Royale,” was published in 1953. Fleming, who came from a well-to-do family in London, worked as a foreign correspondent, stockbroker and personal assistant to Britain’s director of naval intelligence during World War II, experiences that would provide fodder for his best-selling Bond books. The first Bond film, “Dr. No,” was released in 1962 and starred Sean Connery, who also played Bond in “Goldfinger” (as well as five other movies). Since that time, five more actors–George Lazenby, Roger Moore, Timothy Dalton, Pierce Brosnan and Daniel Craig–have portrayed the world’s most famous fictional spy in what has become one of the most lucrative movie franchises in history. Fast cars and high-tech gadgetry have played a central role in all Bond films.
...History.com

You can get Dave's DB5 at http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/starcarz.html


There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Vermin King

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2531
  • Kudos 29
Re: January (2018)
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2018, 12:19:32 PM »
January 10, 1944  William Sanderson Born



Yup, J.F. Sebastian from Blade Runner.

Yes, this is just another excuse to feature Blade Runner models.  On the other hand, he is an interesting character with more credits than I realized.  He is also a lawyer. 

But onto the models, Dave has quite a collection at http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/starcarz.html
There are no strangers in this world ...
Only people I haven't embarrassed ... yet

Dave Winfield

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 2648
  • Kudos 51
    • Dave's Card Creations
Re: January (2018)
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2018, 04:53:16 PM »
Three in a row! wow!

Honest folks, he posts whatever he wants.
I have nothing to do with this! LOL
DAVE WINFIELD - GO TO WWW.CUTANDFOLD.INFO FOR MY DESIGNS AND LOTSA FREE STUFF!