Author Topic: January (2018)  (Read 467 times)

Vermin King

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #22 on: January 19, 2018, 01:13:05 PM »
January 19, 1809  Edgar Allan Poe Born



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On this day in 1809, poet, author and literary critic Edgar Allan Poe is born in Boston, Massachusetts.

By the time he was three years old, both of Poe’s parents had died, leaving him in the care of his godfather, John Allan, a wealthy tobacco merchant. After attending school in England, Poe entered the University of Virginia (UVA) in 1826. After fighting with Allan over his heavy gambling debts, he was forced to leave UVA after only eight months. Poe then served two years in the U.S. Army and won an appointment to West Point. After another falling-out, Allan cut him off completely and he got himself dismissed from the academy for rules infractions.

Dark, handsome and brooding, Poe had published three works of poetry by that time, none of which had received much attention. In 1836, while working as an editor at the Southern Literary Messenger in Richmond, Virginia, Poe married his 13-year-old cousin, Virginia Clemm. He also completed his first full-length work of fiction, Arthur Gordon Pym, published in 1838. Poe lost his job at the Messenger due to his heavy drinking, and the couple moved to Philadelphia, where Poe worked as an editor at Burton’s Gentleman’s Magazine and Graham’s Magazine. He became known for his direct and incisive criticism, as well as for dark horror stories like “The Fall of the House of Usher” and “The Tell-Tale Heart.” Also around this time, Poe began writing mystery stories, including “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” and “The Purloined Letter”–works that would earn him a reputation as the father of the modern detective story.

In 1844, the Poes moved to New York City. He scored a spectacular success the following year with his poem “The Raven.” While Poe was working to launch The Broadway Journal–which soon failed–his wife Virginia fell ill and died of tuberculosis in early 1847. His wife’s death drove Poe even deeper into alcoholism and drug abuse. After becoming involved with several women, Poe returned to Richmond in 1849 and got engaged to an old flame. Before the wedding, however, Poe died suddenly. Though circumstances are somewhat unclear, it appeared he began drinking at a party in Baltimore and disappeared, only to be found incoherent in a gutter three days later. Taken to the hospital, he died on October 7, 1849, at age 40.
  ...History.com

Maybe.  No one will know.  Many biographers suggest that Poe is a victim of having his obituary written by an arch enemy/former friend.  The drinking, opium addiction, and severe depression that he is known for is based mostly on the obituary and interviews with the writer.  Just weeks prior to his death, he was awarded a very lucrative position as managing editor of an established publication.  Engaged to his childhood sweetheart.  He could have been on a bender, or he could have overdosed, or he could have been a victim of foul play, or he could have had a medical condition.  We'll never know.

For the model, I'm going with the Ravensblight Raven, http://ravensblight.com/Raven.html
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Vermin King

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #23 on: January 20, 2018, 03:21:33 AM »
January 20, 1930 Buzz Aldrin Born



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Colonel Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., Sc.D., United States Air Force (Retired), was born at Glen Ridge, New Jersey.

After high school, he turned down a full scholarship to attend the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.) and instead went to the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, graduating in 1951. He accepted a commission in the U.S. Air Force and after pilot training he served as a fighter pilot during the Korean War. Aldrin flew the North American Aviation F-86 Sabre with the 51st Fighter Interceptor Wing. He shot down two enemy MiG 15 fighters for which he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

After returning to the United States, Buzz Aldrin was a flight instructor at Bryan AFB, Texas, and then a gunnery instructor at Nellis AFB, Nevada. Aldrin served at the U.S. Air Force Academy before joining the 22nd Fighter Squadron at Bitberg Air Base, Germany, flying the North American Aviation F-100 Super Sabre.

Edwin E. Aldrin earned his Doctorate in Science in Astronautics (Sc.D.) from M.I.T. by devising orbital navigation techniques. His thesis on Manned Orbital Rendezvous, earned Buzz Aldrin another nickname: “Dr. Rendezvous.” He was accepted by NASA as an astronaut for the Gemini Program,and with Jim Lovell, orbited the Earth for four days aboard Gemini 12. Aldrin performed the first successful “space walk.” He then went on to the Apollo Program.

Along with Neil Alden Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin landed on the Moon, 20 July 1969.
...This Day in Aviation

For the model, let's go with Ken West's at http://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-4-apollo-astronauts-on-the-moon-paper-model.html

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Vermin King

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #24 on: January 20, 2018, 03:22:33 AM »
January 21, 1855 John Browning Born



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John Moses Browning, sometimes referred to as the "father of modern firearms," is born in Ogden, Utah. Many of the guns manufactured by companies whose names evoke the history of the American West-Winchester, Colt, Remington, and Savage-were actually based on John Browning's designs.

The son of a talented gunsmith, John Browning began experimenting with his own gun designs as a young man. When he was 24 years old, he received his first patent, for a rifle that Winchester manufactured as its Single Shot Model 1885. Impressed by the young man's inventiveness, Winchester asked Browning if he could design a lever-action-repeating shotgun. Browning could and did, but his efforts convinced him that a pump-action mechanism would work better, and he patented his first pump model shotgun in 1888.

Fundamentally, all of Browning's manually-operated repeating rifle and shotgun designs were aimed at improving one thing: the speed and reliability with which gun users could fire multiple rounds-whether shooting at game birds or other people. Lever and pump actions allowed the operator to fire a round, operate the lever or pump to quickly eject the spent shell, insert a new cartridge, and then fire again in seconds.

By the late 1880s, Browning had perfected the manual repeating weapon; to make guns that fired any faster, he would somehow have to eliminate the need for slow human beings to actually work the mechanisms. But what force could replace that of the operator moving a lever or pump? Browning discovered the answer during a local shooting competition when he noticed that reeds between a man firing and his target were violently blown aside by gases escaping from the gun muzzle. He decided to try using the force of that escaping gas to automatically work the repeating mechanism.

Browning began experimenting with his idea in 1889. Three years later, he received a patent for the first crude fully automatic weapon that captured the gases at the muzzle and used them to power a mechanism that automatically reloaded the next bullet. In subsequent years, Browning refined his automatic weapon design. When U.S. soldiers went to Europe during WWI, many of them carried Browning Automatic Rifles, as well as Browning's deadly machine guns.

During a career spanning more than five decades, Browning's guns went from being the classic weapons of the American West to deadly tools of world war carnage. Amazingly, since Browning's death in 1926, there have been no further fundamental changes in the modern firearm industry.
... History.com

For more history on Mr. Browning, go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Browning, where there is also a listing of many of his designs.

For the model today, let's go with Trent Henry's M1911, https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-1-colt-1911-45-acp.html

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Vermin King

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #25 on: January 22, 2018, 02:40:50 PM »
January 22, 1940  John Hurt Born



Holy Smokes, I knew he did a lot of work, but I had no idea he had well over 200 credits.  I certainly didn't remember all the TV credits.

Even though he played John Merrick in the Elephant Man, and the War Doctor, and even King Lear and Caligula, I think he will be most remembered for the scene in Alien.



So, even though we could post Harry's wand from Harry Potter, or the Tardis from Doctor Who, I'm going with the chestbuster from Alien, https://noturnosukhoi.blogspot.com/2012/01/alien-chestburster16.html
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Vermin King

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #26 on: January 23, 2018, 12:43:30 PM »
January 23, 1983 A-Team Debuts



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In the pilot episode of the NBC television series The A-Team, which airs on this day in 1983, the go-getting newspaper reporter Amy Allen (Melinda Culea) seeks the help of a mysterious group of Vietnam-veterans-turned-soldiers-for-hire to find her missing colleague in Mexico. An elite commando unit in Vietnam, the so-called A-Team was wrongly imprisoned by the Army. They escaped and began working as mercenaries, doing whatever needed to be done for their various clients while consistently eluding the fanatic Army officers sent to catch them. The A-Team went on to become a huge hit and make a star of the-then little known actor Mr. T.

Produced by Stephen Cannell and first envisioned by Brandon Tartikoff, NBC’s president, as a volatile combination between films such as The Dirty Dozen, The Magnificent Seven and The Road Warrior and TV programs such as Hill Street Blues, The A-Team became a bona fide phenomenon during its five-year run. Despite its late entry to the 1982-83 ratings season, The A-Team was on its way to a No. 1 ranking by season’s end. It also topped a list of the most violent shows on TV, compiled that year by the National Coalition on Television Violence.

George Peppard, who memorably starred opposite Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961), played the A-Team’s leader, John “Hannibal” Smith; he called his A-Team role “probably the best part I’ve had in my career.” The show also featured Dirk Benedict as Templeton “Faceman” Peck and Dwight Schultz as H.M. (Howling Mad) Murdock, but its breakout star was the mohawked, gold-bedecked Mr. T. Born Laurence Tureaud in a tough Chicago neighborhood, Mr. T got into show business after winning a contest as the “World’s Toughest Bouncer.” He was spotted by Sylvester Stallone, who cast him as a boxer in Rocky III (1982). As the surly A-Team mechanic B.A. (Bad Attitude) Baracus, Mr. T uttered some of the show’s most memorable catchphrases, including “You better watch out, sucker” and “Pity the fool.”

Campy and outrageously violent, The A-Team was particularly popular among children and teenagers, and with male audiences. Over the years, the show’s producers experimented with adding a woman to the mix–including Culea’s Amy Allen, Marla Heasley as Tawnia Baker and Tia Carrere (who later starred in Wayne’s World) as a Vietnam war orphan meant to provide a link to the soldiers’ past–but these stints were relatively short-lived, and the team’s testosterone-heavy vibe remained intact. By its fourth season, the show’s popularity was waning, due partially to its formulaic nature and partially to the growing trend towards family-friendly comedy that was being driven by the success of The Cosby Show. In the spring of 1986, Cosby-inspired shows such as Who’s the Boss? and Growing Pains on ABC were beating The A-Team handily in the ratings each week.

A-Team producers tried different tricks to win audiences over, including one episode centered on the popular game show Wheel of Fortune and various guest appearances by such prominent personalities as the pop star Boy George, the professional wrestler Hulk Hogan and the Chicago Bears defensive lineman William “Refrigerator” Perry. The show hung on into a fifth season, but aired only 13 episodes, ending unceremoniously in March 1987.
  ...History.com

For the model, I'll go with Mike Daws's van, https://mikedaws.deviantart.com/art/A-Team-Van-175448363
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Vermin King

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #27 on: January 24, 2018, 12:47:57 PM »
January 24, 1871 Albert Erskine Born



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On this day in 1871, Albert Russell Erskine, who headed up the pioneering American automaker Studebaker before it went bankrupt during the Great Depression, is born in Huntsville, Alabama.

During the late 1800s and early 1900s, Erskine worked for such companies as American Cotton and Underwood Typewriter, before joining South Bend, Indiana-based Studebaker in 1911. The origins of the Studebaker Corporation date back to 1852, when brothers Henry and Clement Studebaker opened a blacksmith shop in South Bend. Studebaker eventually became a leading manufacturer of horse-drawn wagons and supplied wagons to the U.S. Army during the Civil War. Around the turn of the century, the company entered America’s burgeoning auto industry, launching an electric car in 1902 and a gas-powered vehicle two years later that was marketed under the name Studebaker-Garford. After partnering with other automakers, Studebaker began selling gas-powered cars under its own name in 1913, while continuing to make wagons until 1920.

Albert Erskine became the president of Studebaker in 1915. Under his leadership, the company acquired luxury automaker Pierce-Arrow in the late 1920s and launched the affordably priced but short-lived Erskine and Rockne lines, the latter of which was named for the famous University of Notre Dame football coach Knute Rockne (1888-1931). During the early 1930s, Studebaker was hit hard by the Great Depression and Erskine was accused of financial mismanagement. In March 1933, the company was forced into bankruptcy. Erskine, who was saddled with personal debt and health problems, killed himself on July 1, 1933, at the age of 62.

New management got the company back on track, dropping the Rockne brand in July 1933 and selling Pierce-Arrow, among other consolidation moves. In January 1935, the new Studebaker Corporation was incorporated. In the late 1930s, the French-born industrial designer Raymond Loewy began working for Studebaker and would be credited with popular models including the bullet-nosed 1953 Starliner and Starlight coupes and the 1963 Avanti sports coupe.

By the mid-1950s, Studebaker, which didn’t have the resources of its Big Three competitors, had merged with automaker Packard and was again facing financial troubles. By the late 1950s, the Packard brand was dropped. In December 1963, Studebaker shuttered its South Bend plant, ending the production of its cars and trucks in America. The company’s Hamilton, Ontario, facilities remained in operation until March 1966, when Studebaker shut its doors for the final time after 114 years in business.

In April 2009, Chrysler became the first major American automaker since Studebaker to declare bankruptcy.
...History.com

Why bring this up?  Since I was little, I thought the Avanti (which was after Erskine's time) was one of the most beautiful cars ever.  Then I saw this
, but it is unavailable

But there is a Studebaker available, and the original of this vehicle was one of the last wagons from the Studebaker Wagon Works.



You can find Dave's Studebaker at http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/specialz.html
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Vermin King

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #28 on: January 25, 2018, 01:41:17 PM »
January 25, 1931 Dean Jones Born



Okay, not very iconic, but when I was sorting through so many items that either didn't interest me today, or saw things that interested me, but had no models, I saw this one.  And I thought, 'Dave, isn't it about time you made at least one VW?', and why not do the most iconic VW.

I tried to find the original template of this (which is all over the internet), I gave up and decided to use one off of Pinterest (size and clarity).  I'm not going to link to any of the hundreds of Pinterest sites, but link directly to one of their uploads.  I don't usually do that, but like I said, I couldn't find a link that would  have been the original.

So, here's Herbie, https://i.pinimg.com/originals/52/fc/25/52fc25ecddf2244ab045022f429a2cb3.jpg

I thought about using a different one with an undercarriage part and a different way of doing the fenders, but I'm still sticking with this one
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Dave Winfield

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #29 on: January 25, 2018, 03:35:02 PM »
Who is the author of this VW model?
Do you have photos of the built model?

Quite some time ago, I started work on a Koolwheelz Herbie model.
My pattern is weirdly similar to this one.
I took a similar approach to the shape of the center body strip and attachment of the fenders.
I struggled with aligning things though, and stopped working on it.

I'd like to build this one and see how it goes togther...
If it works better than mine, then I'll look at redesigning my idea...and copy this basic template.
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Vermin King

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #30 on: January 25, 2018, 05:00:58 PM »
I tried doing an image search on Bing and Google, and couldn't come up with any links that looked like original.

A few years back, Tektonten did a series of builds of VW bugs, and if you go to his blog, he does a review of seven different models he found.  That was before Wongday's Herbie came out. https://tektonten.blogspot.com/search/label/VW%20Beetle.  His fifth one he built is also from a non-original source, but he talks about how part fit and ease of build is excellent.  I kinda thought I might do that model, but with the textures from the German Disney magazine's textures.

If you are looking at doing one, though, I might just wait
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Dave Winfield

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #31 on: January 25, 2018, 07:21:04 PM »
lol I never realized there were so many Beetle models already out there.
And so many herbie models.
I rarely go looking for models when I start a new project.
lol I guess I should start.
I usually just hunt for photos of the real thing for reference
and then wait for that brainstorm design idea.

I'm going to add Herbie to my list, but theres no way of saying how long it will take.
Or whether it will be any good.
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Burning Beard

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #32 on: January 25, 2018, 08:04:07 PM »
Here is another one Dave, a little more detailed.

http://wongday.blogspot.com.es/2013/11/vw-herbie.html

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