Author Topic: January (2018)  (Read 466 times)

Vermin King

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #33 on: January 25, 2018, 08:04:34 PM »
If you release it, it will be good.  If it isn't, you won't.

I don't remember the movies well enough.  So many styles of wheels and hubcaps, but I think the five-pointed black hub would be the most appropriate
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Vermin King

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #34 on: January 25, 2018, 08:06:07 PM »
Here is another one Dave, a little more detailed.

http://wongday.blogspot.com.es/2013/11/vw-herbie.html

Beard

That was the Wongday one I mentioned.  If you look up movie scenes, most don't have wheels like that.






And none of the models have the proper bumpers...
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Vermin King

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #35 on: January 26, 2018, 09:00:42 AM »
Haven't built it yet, but here's where I'm at on my version of Herbie

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Vermin King

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #36 on: January 26, 2018, 11:41:33 AM »
January 26, 1979 Dukes of Hazzard Premieres



Quote
On this day in 1979, “The Dukes of Hazzard,” a television comedy about two good-old-boy cousins in the rural South and their souped-up 1969 Dodge Charger known as the General Lee, debuts on CBS. The show, which originally aired for seven seasons, centered around cousins Bo Duke (John Schneider) and Luke Duke (Tom Wopat) and their ongoing efforts to elude their nemeses, the crooked county commissioner “Boss” Jefferson Davis Hogg (Sorrell Booke) and the bumbling Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane (James Best).

“The Dukes of Hazzard” was known for its car chases and stunts and the General Lee, which had an orange paint job, a Confederate flag across its roof and the numbers “01” on its welded-shut doors, became a star of the show. The General Lee also had a horn that played the first 12 notes of the song “Dixie.” Due to all the fast driving, jumps and crashes, it was common for several different General Lees to be used during the filming of each episode.

The General Lee also had a CB (Citizens Band) radio and Luke and Bo Duke’s CB nicknames or “handles” were Lost Sheep #1 and Lost Sheep #2, respectively. “The Dukes of Hazzard” (along with the 1977 trucking movie “Smokey and the Bandit”) helped promote the CB craze that swept America from the mid 1970s to the early 1980s.

Among the other cars featured on the show were Boss Hogg’s white Cadillac Deville convertible, Uncle Jesse Duke’s (Denver Pyle) Ford pickup truck and various tow trucks and vehicles belonging to Cooter Davenport (Ben Jones), the local mechanic. Bo and Luke’s short-shorts wearing cousin Daisy Duke (Catherine Bach) drove a yellow Plymouth Roadrunner with black stripes and later a Jeep with a golden eagle emblem on the hood and the word “Dixie” on the doors.

The final episode of “The Dukes of Hazzard” originally aired on August 16, 1985. The show spawned several TV specials and a 2005 movie starring Johnny Knoxville, Seann William Scott and Jessica Simpson.
  ...History.com

Yep, back when a TV show could just be fun.

You can get your General Lee and the Dixie Jeep at http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/starcarz.html
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Vermin King

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #37 on: January 27, 2018, 11:48:06 AM »
January 27, 1965 Shelby GT350 Debut



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On this day in 1965, the Shelby GT 350, a version of a Ford Mustang sports car developed by the American auto racer and car designer Carroll Shelby, is launched. The Shelby GT 350, which featured a 306 horsepower V-8 engine, remained in production through the end of the 1960s and today is a valuable collector’s item.

Carroll Shelby was born in Texas in 1923 and gained fame in the racing world in the 1950s. Among his accomplishments was a victory at the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1959, making him just the second American ever to win the iconic endurance race. By the early 1960s, Shelby had retired from racing for health reasons and was designing high-performance cars. He became known for his race cars, including the Cobra and the Ford GT40, as well as such muscle cars as the Shelby GT 350. According to The New York Times: “In the 60’s, at the apex of the Southern California car efflorescence, his name was synonymous with muscle cars, relatively small vehicles with big, beefy engines. It was an era that many car buffs consider Detroit’s golden age, and Mr. Shelby was arguably its prime mover.”

The Shelby GT 350 was an iteration of the first Ford Mustang, which was officially unveiled by Henry Ford II at the World’s Fair in Flushing Meadows, New York, on April 17, 1964. That same day, the new car also debuted in Ford showrooms across America and almost 22,000 Mustangs were immediately snapped up by buyers. Named for a World War II fighter plane, the Ford Mustang had a long hood and short rear deck. More than 400,000 Mustangs sold within its first year of production, far exceeding sales expectations. Over the ensuing decades, the Mustang has undergone numerous evolutions and remains in production today, with more than 9 million sold.

In addition to collaborating with Ford, Shelby partnered with other automakers, including Chrysler, for whom he designed the Dodge Viper sports car, which launched in 1992.

The Times in 2003 quoted comedian Jay Leno, an avid car collector who has owned several Shelby cars, as saying: “Carroll is sort of like the car world’s Mickey Mantle or Willie Mays… Unlike so many racers, he didn’t come from a rich family, so he signifies that everyman, common-sense ideal. When I was kid, American cars were big, clunky things, until Carroll used his ingenuity to make them compete with European cars. He was a populist, the kind of guy that other car buffs could emulate.”
...History.com

Actually, this just gives me a chance to point to one of my favorite models, http://web.archive.org/web/20120716171254/http://www.daytona-mag.com/papercraft/

I wish the Daytona-Mag series of models would have continued.  Each one I have built was very well done.  I haven't reduced any to 1/50, my normal scale, but I have done the Shelby GT350R and the El Camino at two pages per page and they came out well
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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #38 on: January 28, 2018, 02:08:32 PM »
January 28, 1986 Challenger Disaster



Quote
At 11:38 a.m. EST, on January 28, 1986, the space shuttle Challenger lifts off from Cape Canaveral, Florida, and Christa McAuliffe is on her way to becoming the first ordinary U.S. civilian to travel into space. McAuliffe, a 37-year-old high school social studies teacher from New Hampshire, won a competition that earned her a place among the seven-member crew of the Challenger. She underwent months of shuttle training but then, beginning January 23, was forced to wait six long days as the Challenger‘s launch countdown was repeatedly delayed because of weather and technical problems. Finally, on January 28, the shuttle lifted off.

Seventy-three seconds later, hundreds on the ground, including Christa’s family, stared in disbelief as the shuttle broke up in a forking plume of smoke and fire. Millions more watched the wrenching tragedy unfold on live television. There were no survivors.

In 1976, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) unveiled the world’s first reusable manned spacecraft, the Enterprise. Five years later, space flights of the shuttle began when Columbia traveled into space on a 54-hour mission. Launched by two solid-rocket boosters and an external tank, only the aircraft-like shuttle entered into orbit around Earth. When the mission was completed, the shuttle fired engines to reduce speed and, after descending through the atmosphere, landed like a glider. Early shuttles took satellite equipment into space and carried out various scientific experiments. The Challenger disaster was the first major shuttle accident.

In the aftermath of the disaster, President Ronald Reagan appointed a special commission to determine what went wrong with Challenger and to develop future corrective measures. The presidential commission was headed by former secretary of state William Rogers, and included former astronaut Neil Armstrong and former test pilot Chuck Yeager. The investigation determined that the disaster was caused by the failure of an “O-ring” seal in one of the two solid-fuel rockets. The elastic O-ring did not respond as expected because of the cold temperature at launch time, which began a chain of events that resulted in the massive loss. As a result, NASA did not send astronauts into space for more than two years as it redesigned a number of features of the space shuttle.

In September 1988, space shuttle flights resumed with the successful launching of the Discovery. Since then, the space shuttle has carried out numerous important missions, such as the repair and maintenance of the Hubble Space Telescope and the construction of the International Space Station.

On February 1, 2003, a second space-shuttle disaster rocked the United States when Columbia disintegrated upon reentry of the Earth’s atmosphere. All aboard were killed. Despite fears that the problems that downed Columbia had not been satisfactorily addressed, space-shuttle flights resumed on July 26, 2005, when Discovery was again put into orbit.
  ...History.com

You can get the AXM Challenger at http://www.axmpaperspacescalemodels.com/old/download1.html#.Wm4UXk3rtt8

I had thought that Delta7Studios had a model, but it is the Columbia Disaster tribute model
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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #39 on: January 29, 2018, 11:45:57 AM »
January 29, 1964  Dr. Strangelove



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Stanley Kubrick's black comic masterpiece, Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb opens in theaters to both critical and popular acclaim. The movie's popularity was evidence of changing attitudes toward atomic weapons and the concept of nuclear deterrence.

The movie focused on the actions of a rogue U.S. officer who believes that communists are threatening the "precious bodily fluids" of Americans. Without authorization, he issues orders to U.S. bombers to launch atomic attacks against the Soviet Union. When it becomes evident that some of the bombers may actually drop their atomic payloads, American President Merkin Muffley frantically calls his Soviet counterpart. The Russian leader informs Muffley that an atomic attack on the Soviet Union will automatically unleash the terrible "doomsday machine," which will snuff out all life on the planet. Muffley's chief foreign policy advisor, Dr. Strangelove, reassures the president and chief officials that all is not lost: they can, he posits, survive even the doomsday machine by retreating to deep mineshafts.

Close scrutiny of the Dr. Strangelove character indicated that he was probably a composite of three people: Henry Kissinger, a political scientist who had written about nuclear deterrence strategy; Edward Teller, a key scientist in the development of the hydrogen bomb; and Wernher von Braun, the German scientist who was a leading figure in missile technology.

Little scrutiny was needed, however, to grasp Kubrick's satirical attacks on the American and Russian policies of nuclear stockpiling and massive retaliation. The film's jabs at some of the sacred core beliefs of America's defense strategy struck a chord with the American people. Particularly after the frightening Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962--when nuclear annihilation seemed a very real possibility--the American public was increasingly willing to question the nation's reliance on nuclear weapons.
... History.com

And for the model, let's go with Strangelove on the rocket at Lower Hudson Valley, http://jleslie48.com/gallery_models_scifi.html

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Lighter

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #40 on: January 29, 2018, 12:37:31 PM »
Quote
And for the model, let's go with Strangelove on the rocket at Lower Hudson Valley, http://jleslie48.com/gallery_models_scifi.html



That's Slim Pickens as Major "King" Kong riding an atomic bomb.
Bristow, VA

Vermin King

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #41 on: January 30, 2018, 12:38:18 PM »
January 30, 1920 Mazda Founded

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On this day in 1920, Jujiro Matsuda (1875-1952) forms Toyo Cork Kogyo, a business that makes cork, in Hiroshima, Japan; just over a decade later the company produces its first automobile and eventually changes its name to Mazda. Today, Mazda is known for its affordable, quality-performance vehicles, including the Miata, the world’s best-selling two-seat roadster.

In 1931, the company launched the Mazda-Go, a three-wheeled vehicle that resembled a motorcycle with a cargo-carrier at the back. The company’s car development plans were halted during World War II and the bombing of Hiroshima. In the 1950s, Mazda began making small, four-wheel trucks. The company launched its first passenger car, the R360 Coupe, in 1960 in Japan. Seven years later, Mazda debuted the first rotary engine car, the Cosmo Sport 110S. Mazda entered the American market in 1970, with the R100 coupe, the first mass-produced, rotary-powered car in the U.S. In 1978, the Mazda RX-7, an affordable, “peak-performing” sports car debuted. The following year, the Ford Motor Company took a 25 percent stake in the company.

In 1989, at the Chicago Auto Show, Mazda unveiled the MX-5 Miata, a two-door sports car carrying a starting price tag of $13,800. According to Mazda, the concept for the car was: “affordable to buy and use, lightweight, Jinba Ittai (‘rider and horse as one’) handling, and classic roadster looks.” The 2000 “Guinness Book of World Records” named the Miata the best-selling two-seat convertible in history.

In 1991, in another milestone for the company, a Mazda 787 B won the 24 Hours of Le Mans race, becoming the first rotary-powered car as well as the first Japanese-made auto to do so. However, Mazda was impacted by the economic slump in Japan in the 1990s and in 1996, Ford took a controlling stake in the automaker and rescued it from potential bankruptcy. The two companies shared manufacturing facilities in several countries along with vehicle platforms and other resources. In 2008, Ford, which had been hurt by the global economic crisis and slumping auto sales, relinquished control of Mazda by selling 20 percent of its controlling stake for around $540 million. (Also that year, General Motors sold its stake in Japan-based Suzuki Motor.)

In 2009, Mazda celebrated the 20th anniversary of the MX-5 Miata, whose sales by then had topped nearly 900,000 and which had won almost 180 major automotive awards.
  ...History.com



Mazda has a number of their cars available at their website, http://www.mazda.com/en/csr/social/report/2016papercraft/, including the MX-5 Miata, the Cosmo and the R360
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Vermin King

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Re: January (2018)
« Reply #42 on: January 31, 2018, 12:41:13 PM »
January 31, 2007 Cars.com Lists Top Ten TV Cars

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On this day in 2007, Cars.com names its top 10 most memorable TV cars; a 1982 Pontiac Trans Am named KITT from the show “Knight Rider” tops the list.

Pontiac, a division of General Motors (GM), began making fast, sporty muscle cars in the 1960s, including the GTO, which launched in 1964, the Firebird, introduced in 1967 and the Trans Am, which debuted in 1969. The Trans Am got its first big dose of Hollywood stardom when it was featured in the 1977 Burt Reynolds movie “Smokey and the Bandit.” Continued fame for the car followed with the TV show “Knight Rider,” which originally aired from 1982 to 1986 and starred David Hasselhoff as a man named Michael Knight who traveled around America fighting crime with his indestructible automotive sidekick KITT (Knight Industries Two Thousand), a talking, two-door coupe equipped with artificial intelligence.

Pontiac discontinued the Trans Am in 2002. On April 27, 2009, a financially troubled GM announced it would phase out the entire Pontiac brand by 2010.

The second-place vehicle on the Cars.com list was the the General Lee, a souped-up 1969 Dodge Charger featured on “The Dukes of Hazzard.” The show, which originally aired from 1979 to 1985, centered around two good-old-boy cousins, Bo Duke (John Schneider) and Luke Duke (Tom Wopat), who lived in the rural South and were on a continual quest to elude their nemeses, the crooked county commissioner “Boss” Jefferson Davis Hogg (Sorrell Booke) and the bumbling Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane (James Best). “The Dukes of Hazzard” was known for its car chases and stunts and the General Lee, which had an orange paint job, a horn that played the first 12 notes of the song “Dixie,” a Confederate flag across its roof and the numbers “01” on its welded-shut doors, became a star of the show. Due to all the fast driving, jumps and crashes, it was common for several different General Lees to be used during the filming of each episode. Chrysler introduced the Dodge Charger for the model year 1966 and the car remained in production through 1987. After a hiatus of nearly two decades, Chrysler relaunched the Charger in 2006.

Third place on the Cars.com list went to the mythical Mystery Machine, a multicolored van from the cartoon “Scooby-Doo.” Coming in fourth was the Ferrari 308 GTS from “Magnum, P.I.” Fifth on the list was the Batmobile, a modified 1955 Lincoln Futura concept car that was featured on the show “Batman.” Rounding out the second half of the list were the 1975 Ford Gran Torino from “Starsky and Hutch,” the 1973 Chevrolet El Camino from “My Name is Earl,” the 1983 GMC G-Series from “The A-Team,” the Mach 5 from the animated show “Speed Racer” and the 2005 Maserati Quattroporte seen on “Entourage.”
...History.com

Not exactly my list (Frankly, I've never seen 'My Name is Earl' or 'Entourage'), but not a bad list.

Heather's KITT is still available at https://projectkitt.deviantart.com/art/82-84-Pontiac-Firebird-Paper-Models-348195013
Many of the others can be found in Dave's Star Cars, http://davesdesigns.ca/cutandfold/html/starcarz.html
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