Author Topic: February (2018)  (Read 363 times)

Vermin King

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Re: February (2018)
« Reply #22 on: February 14, 2018, 12:12:46 PM »
February 14, 1968  Lara Croft's Birthday

I'm sticking with the same thing as last year.  My son and I are fans of the franchise, and yet I've never made a Tomb Raider model.  I'll have to fix that



Fictional character's birthday?  Why not?  This has definitely been a very popular game franchise, and the movies didn't do bad.

There are all kinds of Tomb Raider paper models out there, but probably the largest collection is Ninjatoes'.

You can find them here:  http://ninjatoes.wordpress.com/category/tomb-raider/
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Vermin King

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Re: February (2018)
« Reply #23 on: February 15, 2018, 01:32:23 PM »
February 15, 1950 Cinderella Opens



Quote
On this day in 1950, Walt Disney’s animated feature Cinderella opens in theaters across the United States.

The Chicago-born Disney began his career as an advertising cartoonist in Kansas City. After arriving in Hollywood in 1923, he and his older brother Roy set up shop in the back of a real-estate office and began making a series of animated short films called Alice in Cartoonland, featuring various animated characters. In 1928, he introduced the now-immortal character of Mickey Mouse in two silent movies. That November, Mickey debuted on the big screen in Steamboat Willie, the first fully synchronized sound cartoon ever made. Walt Disney provided Mickey’s squeaky voice himself. The company went on to produce a series of sound cartoons, such as the “Silly Symphony” series, which included The Three Little Pigs (1933) and introduced characters like Donald Duck and Goofy.

Disney made a risky bet in 1937 when he championed–and put $1.5 million of his own money into–Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, the first-ever full-length animated feature film. The risk paid off in spades after the film grossed $8 million at the box office, an incredible sum during the Great Depression. Four more animated hits followed in the growing Disney canon–Pinocchio (1940), Fantasia (1940), Dumbo (1941) and Bambi (1942)–before full-scale production was stalled by wartime economic problems. By the end of the decade, audiences were eagerly awaiting the next great Disney offering, having had to satisfy themselves with so-called “package films” like Make Mine Music (1946) and Melody Time (1948).

Cinderella, based on another Brothers Grimm fairy tale, was chosen for its similarity to the Snow White story. The film’s immediate source was Charles Perrault’s French version of the fairy tale, which tells the story of a young girl whose father dies, leaving her at the mercy of her oppressive stepmother and two unsympathetic stepsisters. As in Snow White, Cinderella gets the help of a few friends–in this case singing mice and birds as well as a Fairy Godmother–to escape the prison of her servitude and win the heart of Prince Charming. Along the way to its happy ending–a Disney trademark–the film featured lively animation sequences and enduring songs like “A Dream is a Wish Your Heart Makes” and the Oscar-nominated “Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo.”

Six years in the making, Cinderella became one of Disney’s best-loved films and one of the highest-grossing features of 1950. As with Snow White and other classic animated features, the studio held periodic re-releases of Cinderella in 1957, 1965, 1973, 1981 and 1987, keeping its popularity alive among new generations of moviegoers.
...History.com

For the model, I'm going with the Cinderella's Castle at Seite 42, http://www.seite42.de/78_46e.htm
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Vermin King

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Re: February (2018)
« Reply #24 on: February 16, 2018, 01:10:12 PM »
February 16, 1878 Silver Dollars Made Legal

... Coinflation.com

Quote
The Bland-Allison Act of 1878 called for a return to the minting of silver coins, in what was considered a controversial move for the day. During the late 19th century there was no federal reserve and money was backed by tangible deposits of gold and silver, known as the “bimetallic standard.”

Five years prior to the 1878 legislation, Congress decided to follow the lead of many European nations that had ended buying and minting silver coins since silver was a scarce resource.

The Coinage Act of 1873 acknowledged the gold standard over silver. The price of gold was much more stable than silver; the price of silver to gold declined from 16-to-1 in 1873 to nearly 30-to-1 by 1893. The reason why this become such a contentious issue was because an influx of silver hit the market between 1860 and 1871.

There was a large scale backlash among western farmers who had relied on using silver as a means to pay off debts—they called it the “Crime of ’73.” From then on, the push to a bimetallic standard began. It was backed by western congressmen and miners.

On January 14, 1875 the Specie Payment Resumption Act became a law in the United States and restored the nation to the gold standard. This was achieved through the redemption of previously-unbacked U.S. Notes and reversed inflationary policies that took effect after the Civil War.

Missouri Congressman Richard Bland, whose name was placed on the act, recognized the struggle of his constituents and helped push the Bland-Allison Act forward. Americans could once again use silver as a form of legal tender, although it was not allowed to be used in unlimited fashion like the old policy permitted. At the sadness of the individuals involved in the free-silver movement, who advocated for the unlimited coinage of silver, they would argue that it didn’t reach far enough.

The act required the U.S. Treasury to purchase between $2 and $4 million worth of silver bullion each month at market prices. President Hayes and others attempted to weaken the act’s effect by purchasing only a minimum amount of bullion.

The struggle between gold and hard money would not die with the Bland-Allison Act. It remained a fiercely debated issue during the 1880 presidential election, especially in reference to the Resumption Act. Bland-Allison remained law until it was replaced by the Sherman Silver Purchase Act of 1890.
...Inticweb.com

No model today, but I did give you two faces so you can do your own
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Vermin King

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Re: February (2018)
« Reply #25 on: February 17, 2018, 11:37:34 AM »
February 17, 1864 Confederate Sub Hunley Sinks Union Housatonic



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On February 17, 1864, Hunley attacked and sank the 1240-short ton (1124 metric tons) screw sloop USS Housatonic on Union blockade duty in Charleston's outer harbor. Soon after, Hunley sank, killing all eight of her third crew. This time, the innovative ship was lost.  The previous two times it sank, it had been recovered.

Finally located in 1995, Hunley was recovered in 2000 and is on display in Charleston. Examination in 2012 of recovered Hunley artifacts suggests that the submarine was as close as 20 feet to her target, Housatonic, when her deployed torpedo exploded, which eventually caused the sub's own demise.

  ...Wikipedia

You can find the Hunley at https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-48-css-hunley-1864-paper-model.html
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Vermin King

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Re: February (2018)
« Reply #26 on: February 18, 2018, 02:17:08 PM »
February 18, 2001 The Intimidator Dies at Daytona



Quote
On this day in 2001, Dale Earnhardt Sr., considered one of the greatest drivers in National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) history, dies at the age of 49 in a last-lap crash at the 43rd Daytona 500 in Daytona Beach, Florida. Earnhardt was driving his famous black No. 3 Chevrolet and vying for third place when he collided with another car, then crashed into a wall. After being cut from his car, Earnhardt, whose tough, aggressive driving style earned him the nickname "The Intimidator," was taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead of head injuries.

Earnhardt had been involved in another crash at the Daytona 500 in 1997, when his car flipped upside down on the backstretch. He managed to escape serious injury and went on to win Daytona in 1998, his first and only victory in that race after 20 years of trying. The 200-lap, 500-mile Daytona 500, which was first run in 1959 at the newly opened Daytona International Speedway, is one of NASCAR's premiere events as well as its season opener.

Earnhardt, whose father was a race car driver, was born on April 29, 1951, in Kannapolis, North Carolina, and dropped out of high school to pursue his own racing career. He went on to become one of NASCAR's most successful and respected competitors, winning 76 Winston Cup (now known as the Sprint Cup) races in his career and taking home a record seven Cup championships, a feat achieved by just one other driver in his sport, Richard Petty. In addition to his legendary accomplishments as a driver, Earnhardt was also a successful businessman and NASCAR team owner. The 2001 Daytona race which cost Earnhardt his life was won by Michael Waltrip, who drove for Dale Earnhardt Inc. (DEI). Earnhardt's son, Dale Jr., also a DEI driver (until 2008, when he began driving for the Hendrick Motorsports team), took second place in the race.

Dale Earnhardt Sr.'s death in 2001 made him the fourth NASCAR driver to die within a nine-month period and eventually prompted NASCAR officials to implement a series of more stringent safety regulations, including the use of head-and-neck restraints.
... History.com

I thought that Cami used to have a model of #3, but I cannot seem to find it now.  So we'll have to go with the papertoys.com version, http://www.papertoys.com/nascar.htm.  If you can find a link to Cami's 2008-issued version, let us know
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Vermin King

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Re: February (2018)
« Reply #27 on: February 19, 2018, 02:12:36 PM »
For a day off, this one has been pretty busy ...

Februry 19, 1986 Mir Core Module Launched



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The core module of the Mir space station (DOS-7) (Dolgovremennaya Orbitalnaya Stanziya) was launched from Site 200 of the Baikonur Cosmodrome aboard a Proton 8K82K rocket. This was the first section of the space station. It consisted of living quarters and environmental systems, engines, and four air locks to which additional modules would be attached.

The Mir was unmanned when it was placed in low Earth orbit. The first two-man crew arrived 15 March 1986 and began bringing the space station systems online. The first expedition stayed aboard for 51 days.
... This Day in Aviation



You can get your own Mir Space Station at http://www.axmpaperspacescalemodels.com/old/Historicalspacestations.html#.WKhdRk3rvjo
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Vermin King

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Re: February (2018)
« Reply #28 on: February 20, 2018, 01:11:02 PM »
February 20, 1942 Butch O'Hare Becomes U.S. First WWII Flying Ace



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On this day, Lt. Edward O’Hare takes off from the aircraft carrier Lexington in a raid against the Japanese position at Rabaul-and minutes later becomes America’s first flying ace.

In mid-February 1942, the Lexington sailed into the Coral Sea. Rabaul, a town at the very tip of New Britain, one of the islands that comprised the Bismarck Archipelago, had been invaded in January by the Japanese and transformed into a stronghold–in fact, one huge airbase. The Japanese were now in prime striking position for the Solomon Islands, next on the agenda for expanding their ever-growing Pacific empire. The Lexington‘s mission was to destabilize the Japanese position on Rabaul with a bombing raid.

Aboard the Lexington was U.S. Navy fighter pilot Lt. Edward O’Hare, attached to Fighting Squadron 3 when the United States entered the war. As the Lexington left Bougainville, the largest of the Solomon Islands in the South Pacific (and still free from Japanese control), for Rabaul, ship radar picked up Japanese bombers headed straight for the carrier. O’Hare and his team went into action, piloting F4F Wildcats. In a mere four minutes, O’Hare shot down five Japanese G4M1 Betty bombers–bringing a swift end to the Japanese attack and earning O’Hare the designation “ace” (given to any pilot who had five or more downed enemy planes to his credit).

Although the Lexington blew back the Japanese bombers, the element of surprise was gone, and the attempt to raid Rabaul was aborted for the time being. O’Hare was awarded the Medal of Honor for his bravery–and excellent aim.
  ...History.com

He also has a busy airport in Chicago named after him

You can get O'Hare's plane and two other versions in this kit, https://www.ecardmodels.com/index.php/1-48-grumman-f-4f-wildcat.html
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Vermin King

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Re: February (2018)
« Reply #29 on: February 21, 2018, 12:30:48 PM »
February 21, 1972 Nixon Visits China

Old Klingon proverb -- Only Nixon could go to China (I forget which Star Trek movie that was from)

... Britannica

Quote
In an amazing turn of events, President Richard Nixon takes a dramatic first step toward normalizing relations with the communist People’s Republic of China (PRC) by traveling to Beijing for a week of talks. Nixon’s historic visit began the slow process of the re-establishing diplomatic relations between the United States and communist China.

Still mired in the unpopular and frustrating Vietnam War in 1971, Nixon surprised the American people by announcing a planned trip to the PRC in 1972. The United States had never stopped formally recognizing the PRC after Mao Zedong’s successful communist revolution of 1949. In fact, the two nations had been bitter enemies. PRC and U.S. troops fought in Korea during the early-1950s, and Chinese aid and advisors supported North Vietnam in its war against the United States.

Nixon seemed an unlikely candidate to thaw those chilly relations. During the 1940s and 1950s, he had been a vocal cold warrior and had condemned the Democratic administration of Harry S. Truman for “losing” China to the communists in 1949. The situation had changed dramatically since that time, though. In Vietnam, the Soviets, not the Chinese, had become the most significant supporters of the North Vietnamese regime. And the war in Vietnam was not going well. The American people were impatient for an end to the conflict, and it was becoming increasingly apparent that the United States might not be able to save its ally, South Vietnam, from its communist aggressors. The American fear of a monolithic communist bloc had been modified, as a war of words—and occasional border conflicts—erupted between the Soviet Union and the PRC in the 1960s. Nixon, and National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger saw a unique opportunity in these circumstances—diplomatic overtures to the PRC might make the Soviet Union more malleable to U.S. policy requests (such as pressuring the North Vietnamese to sign a peace treaty acceptable to the United States). In fact, Nixon was scheduled to travel to meet Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev shortly after completing his visit to China.

Nixon’s trip to China, therefore, was a move calculated to drive an even deeper wedge between the two most significant communist powers. The United States could use closer diplomatic relations with China as leverage in dealing with the Soviets, particularly on the issue of Vietnam. In addition, the United States might be able to make use of the Chinese as a counterweight to North Vietnam. Despite their claims of socialist solidarity, the PRC and North Vietnam were, at best, strongly suspicious allies. As historian Walter LaFeber said, “Instead of using Vietnam to contain China, Nixon concluded that he had better use China to contain Vietnam.” For its part, the PRC was desirous of another ally in its increasingly tense relationship with the Soviet Union and certainly welcomed the possibility of increased U.S.-China trade.
  ...History.com

For the model, let's go with the Great Wall from Canon, http://cp.c-ij.com/en/contents/CNT-0011892/index.html
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Vermin King

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Re: February (2018)
« Reply #30 on: February 22, 2018, 01:00:16 PM »
February 22, 2011 Christchurch Earthquake



Quote
An earthquake occurred in Christchurch on 22 February 2011 at 12:51 p.m. local time (23:51 21 February UTC) and registered 6.3 on the Richter scale. The earthquake struck the Canterbury Region in New Zealand's South Island and was centred 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) west of the port town of Lyttelton, and 10 kilometres (6 mi) south-east of the centre of Christchurch, at the time New Zealand's second-most populous city. The earthquake caused widespread damage across Christchurch, killing 185 people in the nation's fifth-deadliest disaster.

Christchurch's central city and eastern suburbs were badly affected, with damage to buildings and infrastructure already weakened by the magnitude 7.1 Canterbury earthquake of 4 September 2010 and its aftershocks. Significant liquefaction affected the eastern suburbs, producing around 400,000 tonnes of silt. The earthquake was felt across the South Island and parts of the lower and central North Island. While the initial quake only lasted for approximately 10 seconds, the damage was severe because of the location and shallowness of the earthquake's focus in relation to Christchurch as well as previous quake damage. Subsequent population loss saw the Christchurch main urban area fall behind the Wellington equivalent to decrease from second to third most populous area in New Zealand.

185 people from more than 20 countries died in the earthquake. Over half of the deaths occurred in the six-storey Canterbury Television (CTV) Building, which collapsed and caught fire in the earthquake. A state of local emergency was initially declared by the Mayor of Christchurch, which was superseded when the government declared a state of national emergency, which stayed in force until 30 April 2011
...Wikipedia

You can find a model of pre-earthquake Christchurch Cathedral at http://cp.c-ij.com/en/contents/CNT-0010365/index.html

There are no strangers in this world ...
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